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View Full Version : Steinbrenner passes away at 80



OldRightHander
07-13-2010, 09:26 AM
Hearing on the radio right now.

http://www.myfoxny.com/dpp/news/local_news/nyc/george-steinbrenner-heart-attack-20100713

WVRed
07-13-2010, 09:50 AM
Just saw on Fox News just now scrolling across the screen that he has passed away.

Thoughts and prayers go out to his family and Yankee Nation. This has been a pretty traumatic week losing Bob Sheppard and now George.

bucksfan2
07-13-2010, 09:55 AM
Yea the WSJ is reporting he has died as well.

westofyou
07-13-2010, 09:57 AM
Wow, there goes one of the biggest personalities the game ever had.

Bet you didn't know.. when George bought the Yankees from CBS in the early 70's he told TSN that he would be a "background" owner, as he didn't know too much about baseball and felt he'd let the pros handle it before he got involved.

nate
07-13-2010, 09:57 AM
Wow!

NJReds
07-13-2010, 10:01 AM
Just saw on Fox News just now scrolling across the screen that he has passed away.

Thoughts and prayers go out to his family and Yankee Nation. This has been a pretty traumatic week losing Bob Sheppard and now George.

I grew up in the suburbs of NY in the late 70s, and even though I became a Reds fan, the Yankees were a big part of my baseball memories. George, Phil Rizzuto on TV, Billy Martin ... all gone.

Bob Sheppard was also the voice of the NY Giants from 1956-2006, I believe.


I expect Friday night to be a very emotional night at Yankees Stadium.

Reds Fanatic
07-13-2010, 10:04 AM
RIP George. He passed away at the ago of 80.

He bought the Yankees in 1973 at a cost of $10 million and the franchise is now worth billions. Since he bought the team the Yankees won 7 World Series titles and 11 AL pennants.

savafan
07-13-2010, 10:05 AM
He tried to buy the Indians before buying the Yankees. Imagine an alternate reality where that had happened.

RIP George.

Jpup
07-13-2010, 10:06 AM
He tried to buy the Indians before buying the Yankees. Imagine an alternate reality where that had happened.

RIP George.

He would not have had New York. George was good at what he did, for the most part, but New York is what the Yankees are all about.

Ghosts of 1990
07-13-2010, 10:17 AM
RIP George.

A legend forever. Ironic that he passes just two days after Bob Sheppard. And on the day of the All-Star Game

NJReds
07-13-2010, 10:22 AM
RIP George.

A legend forever. Ironic that he passes just two days after Bob Sheppard. And on the day of the All-Star Game

He always did like to grab the back page headlines in the Post and the Daily News. RIP.

reds1869
07-13-2010, 10:23 AM
I'll always have fond memories of a great Ohioan. The Yankees may be the Evil Empire but the game won't be the same without George.

Johnny Footstool
07-13-2010, 10:33 AM
RIP George.

A legend forever. Ironic that he passes just two days after Bob Sheppard. And on the day of the All-Star Game

It's not ironic, but it is an interesting coincidence.

redsmetz
07-13-2010, 10:34 AM
Here's the NY Times obit:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/14/sports/baseball/14steinbrenner.html?_r=1&hp

westofyou
07-13-2010, 10:34 AM
Here's the NY Times obit:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/14/sports/baseball/14steinbrenner.html?_r=1&hp

Evidently sitting on file in wait mode

HeatherC1212
07-13-2010, 10:39 AM
Wow, that's sad news to read right before the All Star game. My thoughts and prayers go out to his family and friends, the Yankees, and all the Yankee fans who have been through a rough last few days. RIP George. :(

OnBaseMachine
07-13-2010, 11:31 AM
Wow, that's sad news. RIP George.

George Anderson
07-13-2010, 11:32 AM
The book "The Bronx Zoo" by Sparky Lyle is a pretty good read and gave good insight to George.

cumberlandreds
07-13-2010, 11:42 AM
First Bob Sheppard,then Steinbrenner. They come in three's, you know.

R.I.P George Steinbrenner. You were entertaining and a winner.

westofyou
07-13-2010, 11:42 AM
The book "The Bronx Zoo" by Sparky Lyle is a pretty good read and gave good insight to George.

As is "Balls" and "#1"

Mario-Rijo
07-13-2010, 11:49 AM
RIP George, the man demanded a winner hard to hate that as a fan of the game.

vic715
07-13-2010, 12:05 PM
George and Billy together again.

westofyou
07-13-2010, 12:13 PM
November 22, 1980
SPORTS OF THE TIMES
The Food on a Table at the Execution

By DAVE ANDERSON
NEAR the door of George Steinbrenner's office in Yankee Stadium yesterday, there were two trays of bite-sized roast beef, turkey and ham sandwiches, each with a toothpick in it. As soon as 14 invited newsmen entered his office for the execution of Dick Howser as manager and the transfer of Gene Michael from general manager to dugout manager, Steinbrenner, the Yankees' principal owner looked around. ''Anybody want any sandwiches?'' he asked. ''We've got a lot of sandwiches here.'' Gene Michael had piled four little roast beef sandwiches on a small plastic plate and he had a cup of coffee. But as he sat against he far wall, under a huge Yankee top-hat insignia and several enlarged photos of memorable Yankee Stadium moments, he was the only one eating when Dick Howser suddenly appeared and walked quickly to a chair in front of the table with the sandwiches.

''Nobody wants a sandwich?'' George Steinbrenner asked. ''Nobody wants a drink?'' One of the newsmen ordered a glass of white wine from the bartender, but that was all. Then there was a momentary silence as George Steinbrenner, husky in a soft-blue shirt with a navy blue and green striped tie, sat at a big tan vinyl chair behind his shiny round desk. On the desk was a gold numeral one, maybe several inches high, and a small sign announcing, ''Lead, Follow or Get the Hell Out of the Way,'' and a miniature brass ship's telegraph.

"During the season it's always pointed to full speed ahead,'' he would explain later. ''But in the offseason it's on standby.'' To the owner's right, about 10 feet away, Dick Howser sat stiffly. His legs crossed, he was wearing a beige shirt, a brown tie, brown pants and brown cowboy boots. He was staring out away from George Steinbrenner, staring blankly at the white draperies that had been drawn across the huge window that overlooks the grassy geometry of the ball field where Dick Howser no longer would work. Most of the time he had his left index finger up against his left cheek, as if to keep from having to look at the Yankee owner who now was discussing the managerial situation that had been simmering for several weeks.

"Dick has decided," George Steinbrenner began, ''that he will not be returning to the Yankees next year. I should say, not returning to the Yankees as manager.''

Dick has decided. That would be the premise of George Steinbrenner's explanation. Dick has decided. Ostensibly he suddenly decided to go into real estate development in Tallahassee, Fla., and be the supervisor of Yankee scouts in the Southeast after having been the manager for the Yankee team that won 103 games last season, after having been in baseball virtually all his life as a major league infielder, major league coach, college coach and major league manager of baseball's most famous franchise.

But baseball's most famous franchise also has baseball's most demanding owner. When the Yankees were swept in three games by the Kansas City Royals in the American League championship series, George Steinbrenner steamed. And now Dick Howser is in real estate and is a Yankee scouting supervisor.

''At no time,'' George Steinbrenner said yesterday, ''did I lay down rules or commandments that Dick would have to live by if he returned as manager. The door was open for him to return, but he chose to accept this business opportunity. It took so long because he wanted to make sure he was doing the right thing.''

All the while Dick Howser stared at the drawn draperies. ''But could Dick,'' somebody asked George Steinbrenner, ''still be the manager if he wanted to be?'' ''Yes.'' ''Dick, why don't you want to be?'' ''I have to be cautious here,'' Dick Howser said staring straight ahead. ''But the other thing popped up.'' ''Were you satisfied that you could have returned without conditions?'' ''I'd rather not comment on that,'' Dick Howser said. ''If you had won the World Series instead of being eliminated in the playoffs,'' he was asked, ''would you have taken this real estate opportunity?''

''That's hard to say.'' ''Were you fired, Dick?'' ''I'm not going to comment on that,'' the former manager said. ''I didn't fire the man,'' the owner said.

Maybe not, but it is reasonable to believe that George Steinbrenner suggested that Dick Howser look for employment elsewhere. That way George Steinbrenner could put Gene Michael, whom he considers a more combative manager, in the dugout. Perhaps to soothe his conscience, he disclosed yesterday that Dick Howser would be paid his reported $100,000 salary for each of the remaining two years on this three-year contract.

''I feel morally and contractually obligated to Dick and his wife, Nancy,'' the owner said. ''I took him out of Florida State, where he was the baseball coach and where he could have stayed for life. If it hasn't worked out, maybe it's my fault.''

If it hasn't worked out. Until then it had been, '"Dick had decided''. But perhaps on a slip of the tongue it was, ''if it hasn't worked out''. Anybody who knew George Steinbrenner knew that all along. And anybody who knew Dick Howser knew that, if given a choice, he would not decide to go into real estate development rathe r than bethe Yankees' manager.

But still George Steinbrenner persisted. ''I think it's safe to say,'' he said at one point yesterday, ''that Dick Howser wants to be a Florida resident year-round, right, Dick?''

Dick Howser didn't even answer that one. Say this for Dick Howser - instead of going along with George Steinbrenner's party line yesterday, he declined to comment. By not answering questions, he answered them. Anybody could see that. And anybody could see through George Steinbrenner's scheme.

''What advice,'' Dick Howser was being asked now, ''would you give Gene Michael?'' ''To have a strong stomach,'' Dick Howser replied, smiling thinly, ''and a nice contract.'' Minutes later, the execution was over. Dick Howser got up quickly and walked out of the room without a smile. Behind his round desk, George Steinbrenner looked around.

''Nobody ate any sandwiches,'' the Yankee owner said.

Tom Servo
07-13-2010, 02:36 PM
http://cache-04.gawkerassets.com/assets/images/11/2010/07/500x_custom_1279033874987_steinbrenneryesnetwork.j pg

MrCinatit
07-13-2010, 02:48 PM
Sad to see, but The Boss had been pretty sick the last few years. The last time I saw him, he clearly was not the same man.

RFS62
07-13-2010, 04:11 PM
That was a fantastic piece of writing.

Thanks, WOY

NJReds
07-13-2010, 04:21 PM
http://assets.nydailynews.com/img/2010/07/14/amd_cover_steinbrenner.jpg

Reds4Life
07-13-2010, 06:39 PM
Although many didn't like the way he "bought" championships, you have to respect him, he put his money where his mouth was. Many owners talk the talk, but don't walk the walk. George did.

Rest well, Mr. Steinbrenner.

_Sir_Charles_
07-13-2010, 06:41 PM
He was a man you loved to hate, but you can't fault the man's drive for success. He was one of the most fiery personalities in baseball...ever. RIP George.

redsmetz
07-14-2010, 06:10 AM
A humorous anecdote about Steinbrenner and the recurring role on Seinfeld. Did the Steinbrenner character ever try to require George Costanza to change his name? That would have been funny.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/14/opinion/14dowd.html?_r=1&ref=opinion

NJReds
07-14-2010, 10:17 AM
Although many didn't like the way he "bought" championships, you have to respect him, he put his money where his mouth was. Many owners talk the talk, but don't walk the walk. George did.

Rest well, Mr. Steinbrenner.

The sports talk radio over the past two days here in NY has been outstanding. The stories about Steinbrenner range from terrible, to benevolent, to outstanding. Just about anyone who has had anything to do with baseball over the past 40 or so years has been on the air.

westofyou
07-14-2010, 03:12 PM
http://bats.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/07/13/the-parking-pass-interview/#more-30831



In early 1992, during his second forced exile from Major League Baseball, I went to Tampa to visit with him and got a room in the hotel he owned there. That evening I was seated at the hotel bar when one of the waitresses ran over to the bartender and said, “O.K., relax, he’s gone.”

“George?” I asked.

“Yeah,” the bartender said. “He keeps everyone on alert.”

We compared notes on some of the crazy things we had seen this famous man do. We both laughed. Then the bartender turned to me and said: “I’ve got another story. My husband needed heart surgery last year, but his health insurance wouldn’t pay for it. I didn’t go to Mr. Steinbrenner, but someone told him. He came to me and told me he would pay for it and he got my husband the best heart surgeon in Tampa.”

The waitress had come over toward the end of the story.

“My son was a bellboy here and he happened to tell Mr. Steinbrenner that he was going to night school to become a teacher,” she said. “Mr. Steinbrenner told my son that if he got A’s in all his courses for a year, he would pay his tuition for the next year.

“And he did. And Mr. Steinbrenner paid for the next year, too. He’s a teacher now.”

The two women looked at each other.

“He really is a generous man who wants to help,” one said.

“Definitely,” added the other. “A nice man, really. But I’m glad he went home.”

paulrichjr
07-14-2010, 11:56 PM
Haven't seen this menioned anywhere and it might seem a little strange to talk about to some, but the Steinbrenner family and the Yankees are certainly set up to be even wealthier going forward (that much easier to buy a championship). This year and only this year the unified credit for estate taxes went to unlimited which means in everyday language...no estate taxes for the Steinbrenner family. This will mean at least $500 million in tax savings for the family....probably more. I would assume that if the Yankees had a good estate planner, George probably did several things to avoid and or pay for these taxes including buying life insurance to fund the estate taxes. Now this is brought into the family without it being needed. This could easily translate into millions of more dollars. The Yanks just got much much richer.

bucksfan2
07-15-2010, 08:26 AM
Nice post WOY. I have heard of several stories like that involving Steinbrenner.

I still believe that George is responsible for the elimination of the competitive balance in baseball. He is the reason why teams that don't play in a large market are behind the 8 ball from the start. However George I don't really blame George he had a pretty weaselly accomplice, Bud Selig. George did what every fan would want him to do, baseball just needed to step in and Bud refused to do so.

UKFlounder
07-15-2010, 08:32 AM
Sad news, but I do have a question

Does he belong in the baseball Hall of Fame for the multiple championships as an owner? Or does he not belong because he was "just" an owner that used the system? Or might he be a legit candidate, but one who should be disqualified due to his suspensions from running the franchise? Should someone who basically tried to blackmail Dave Winfield even be eligible for this discussion?

Is that even a fair discussion to have?

Sea Ray
07-15-2010, 09:30 AM
Haven't seen this menioned anywhere and it might seem a little strange to talk about to some, but the Steinbrenner family and the Yankees are certainly set up to be even wealthier going forward (that much easier to buy a championship). This year and only this year the unified credit for estate taxes went to unlimited which means in everyday language...no estate taxes for the Steinbrenner family. This will mean at least $500 million in tax savings for the family....probably more. I would assume that if the Yankees had a good estate planner, George probably did several things to avoid and or pay for these taxes including buying life insurance to fund the estate taxes. Now this is brought into the family without it being needed. This could easily translate into millions of more dollars. The Yanks just got much much richer.

I hadn't thought of that but you may be right, however I'm sure he didn't have life insurance for estate taxes. You can't buy $500,000,000 policies for 80 yr olds. It's a shame that this has to be such an unusual year in that the gov't can't get its grimy little hands on people's estates

Sea Ray
07-15-2010, 09:33 AM
Sad news, but I do have a question

Does he belong in the baseball Hall of Fame for the multiple championships as an owner? Or does he not belong because he was "just" an owner that used the system? Or might he be a legit candidate, but one who should be disqualified due to his suspensions from running the franchise? Should someone who basically tried to blackmail Dave Winfield even be eligible for this discussion?

Is that even a fair discussion to have?

You bring up a great question and my thinking is he will make the Hall and probably very soon however I disagree. He was suspended twice by the Commissioner and how many owners can say that?

Steinbrenner lucked into a great situation in NY. The advent of free agency and cable TV really played to what NY had to offer and that left George in the catbird's seat.

George Anderson
07-15-2010, 09:44 AM
Sad news, but I do have a question

Does he belong in the baseball Hall of Fame for the multiple championships as an owner? Or does he not belong because he was "just" an owner that used the system? Or might he be a legit candidate, but one who should be disqualified due to his suspensions from running the franchise? Should someone who basically tried to blackmail Dave Winfield even be eligible for this discussion?

?

I would say he does not belong based on below.

http://baseballhall.org/hall-famers/rules-election/bbwaa

5. Voting: Voting shall be based upon the player's record, playing ability, integrity, sportsmanship, character, and contributions to the team(s) on which the player played.



Twice being kicked out of baseball, being a convicted felon and the associating with gamblers with the whole Dave Winfield incident rules him out IMO.

westofyou
07-15-2010, 10:08 AM
Nice post WOY. I have heard of several stories like that involving Steinbrenner.

I still believe that George is responsible for the elimination of the competitive balance in baseball. He is the reason why teams that don't play in a large market are behind the 8 ball from the start. However George I don't really blame George he had a pretty weaselly accomplice, Bud Selig. George did what every fan would want him to do, baseball just needed to step in and Bud refused to do so.

How does Bud get blamed for George working the system years prior to Bud becoming a figurehead?

George was doing everything he did in the 90's back in the 70's, when Bud was nothing but a minority owner of a team that had once been bankrupt.

bucksfan2
07-15-2010, 10:24 AM
How does Bud get blamed for George working the system years prior to Bud becoming a figurehead?

George was doing everything he did in the 90's back in the 70's, when Bud was nothing but a minority owner of a team that had once been bankrupt.

Salaries skyrocketed shortly after the 1994 baseball strike. Prior to the strike not only were teams like the Reds and Royals competitive, but they also were able to keep their payrolls in the top 3rd of MLB. After that the Yankees began spending money that no other team could. Over the last few season the Yankees payroll is $40M-80M more than the second place team.

I don't necessarily fault George because he did what the system allowed. I do fault Bud for being asleep at the wheel over the past decade plus for allowing the competitive balance to all but disappear.

cumberlandreds
07-15-2010, 01:19 PM
Salaries skyrocketed shortly after the 1994 baseball strike. Prior to the strike not only were teams like the Reds and Royals competitive, but they also were able to keep their payrolls in the top 3rd of MLB. After that the Yankees began spending money that no other team could. Over the last few season the Yankees payroll is $40M-80M more than the second place team.

I don't necessarily fault George because he did what the system allowed. I do fault Bud for being asleep at the wheel over the past decade plus for allowing the competitive balance to all but disappear.

I'm no defender of Bud Selig but what could he have done to stop spending? With the players union watching he could never implement a salary cap or an equal TV revenue sharing plan. The owners tried colluding on salaries at one time and got hammered in the courts for it. If he had secretly sent Steinbrenner or anyone else a letter saying let's hold down salaries, I guarantee you it would have got out and all the collusion stuff would have hit the fan again. Until players union and owners get together on sort of salary cap or salary floor there's not a darn thing the commissioner can ever do about a team spending as much as they want on players.

paulrichjr
07-15-2010, 10:42 PM
I hadn't thought of that but you may be right, however I'm sure he didn't have life insurance for estate taxes. You can't buy $500,000,000 policies for 80 yr olds. It's a shame that this has to be such an unusual year in that the gov't can't get its grimy little hands on people's estates

You don't buy it when he is 80 and about to die. He has probably been planning for estate taxes for at least 25 years...and the year he dies there isn't any. I'm sure he didn't have $500,000,000 but I would bet he had way more than $10,000,000. His long time financial advisor was on ESPN last night discussing the Yankees and mentioned that the Yanks would stay in the family basically forever...it dawned on me then why he was saying that. That is not something everyone can say...Miami Dolphins were sold because Joe Robbie had no estate plan.

paulrichjr
07-15-2010, 10:43 PM
Just found this article... I actually guessed pretty good.

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/steinbrenner_children_dodge_estate_Q5nSWtc1DrNPCGv 6URysrK