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Brutus
08-17-2010, 12:24 AM
This has been thrown around a lot this season. While I think there's some truth to the core of young arms in baseball right now, it's interesting that offensive stats are down to pre-strike levels (read: pre-steroid levels).

I retrieved data for the last 30 years. Homers are down to a 17-year low. I think Citi Field, Comerica, Petco and some of these more spacious ballparks give hope that the homer-happy days of Major League Baseball could again be over for a while (these things always run in cycles anyhow).

Interestingly, though, strikeout rates are at an all-time high. That's partially because of the new, pitch-taking, homer-happy strategy... though the 3-run homers aren't as common these days.

But here's the 30-year data. It's interesting.


Year R/G HR BA OBP SLG OPS K% BB% HR%
2010 4.42 3,342 0.259 0.327 0.406 0.733 18.2% 8.6% 2.5%
2009 4.61 5,042 0.262 0.333 0.418 0.751 18.0% 8.9% 2.7%
2008 4.65 4,878 0.264 0.333 0.416 0.749 17.5% 8.7% 2.6%
2007 4.80 4,957 0.268 0.336 0.423 0.758 17.1% 8.5% 2.6%
2006 4.86 5,386 0.269 0.337 0.432 0.768 16.8% 8.4% 2.9%
2005 4.59 5,017 0.264 0.330 0.419 0.749 16.5% 8.2% 2.7%
2004 4.81 5,451 0.266 0.335 0.428 0.763 16.9% 8.6% 2.9%
2003 4.73 5,207 0.264 0.333 0.422 0.755 16.4% 8.5% 2.8%
2002 4.62 5,059 0.261 0.331 0.417 0.748 16.8% 8.7% 2.7%
2001 4.78 5,458 0.264 0.332 0.427 0.759 17.3% 8.5% 2.9%
2000 5.14 5,693 0.270 0.345 0.437 0.782 16.5% 9.6% 3.0%
1999 5.08 5,528 0.271 0.345 0.434 0.778 16.4% 9.4% 2.9%
1998 4.79 5,064 0.266 0.335 0.420 0.755 16.9% 8.7% 2.7%
1997 4.77 4,640 0.267 0.337 0.419 0.756 17.1% 8.9% 2.6%
1996 5.04 4,962 0.270 0.340 0.427 0.767 16.5% 9.1% 2.8%
1995 4.85 4,081 0.267 0.338 0.417 0.755 16.2% 9.1% 2.6%
1994 4.92 3,306 0.270 0.339 0.424 0.763 15.9% 8.9% 2.7%
1993 4.60 4,030 0.265 0.332 0.403 0.736 15.1% 8.7% 2.3%
1992 4.12 3,038 0.256 0.322 0.377 0.700 14.7% 8.5% 1.9%
1991 4.31 3,383 0.256 0.323 0.385 0.708 15.2% 8.7% 2.1%
1990 4.26 3,317 0.258 0.325 0.385 0.710 14.9% 8.6% 2.1%
1989 4.13 3,083 0.254 0.320 0.375 0.695 14.8% 8.5% 1.9%
1988 4.14 3,180 0.254 0.318 0.378 0.696 14.7% 8.1% 2.0%
1987 4.72 4,458 0.263 0.331 0.415 0.747 15.5% 8.9% 2.8%
1986 4.41 3,813 0.258 0.326 0.395 0.721 15.4% 8.8% 2.4%
1985 4.33 3,602 0.257 0.323 0.391 0.714 14.0% 8.6% 2.2%
1984 4.26 3,258 0.260 0.323 0.385 0.708 14.0% 8.3% 2.0%
1983 4.31 3,301 0.261 0.325 0.389 0.714 13.5% 8.4% 2.1%
1982 4.30 3,379 0.261 0.324 0.389 0.713 13.2% 8.3% 2.1%
1981 4.00 1,781 0.256 0.320 0.369 0.689 12.5% 8.4% 1.7%
1980 4.29 3,087 0.265 0.326 0.388 0.714 12.5% 8.2% 1.9%

The Operator
08-17-2010, 12:28 AM
I've been enjoying it. It's been frustrating to watch The Reds, with such a highly ranked offense, get shutout so many times, but it's a nice change after all of the steroid years.

It's kinda cool to look at the home run leader board and see that even the top guys are on pace for around 40-45.

Brutus
08-17-2010, 12:32 AM
I've been enjoying it. It's been frustrating to watch The Reds, with such a highly ranked offense, get shutout so many times, but it's a nice change after all of the steroid years.

It's kinda cool to look at the home run leader board and see that even the top guys are on pace for around 40-45.

Yep. Take away Jose Bautista, who is truly his own exception to the rule this year, and only a select few players are even on pace to break 40 homers. There are a lot of perennial 30-homer guys stuck in the teens and low 20's this year.