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View Full Version : Bobby Thomson dies, age 86



redsmetz
08-17-2010, 03:07 PM
Just heard it reported on NPR that Giants great, hitter of the shot heard round the world, died today at age 86.

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/postmortem/2010/08/bobby-thomson-ny-giants-home-r.html

westofyou
08-17-2010, 03:13 PM
Bobby fact - He lost his position in NYC to Willie Mays and in Milwaukee to Hank Aaron

MrCinatit
08-17-2010, 03:19 PM
I never tire of hearing "The Call". Pure joy.

George Anderson
08-17-2010, 04:59 PM
I guess we will now never know for sure if Bobby was tipped off by sign stealers in the CF scoreboard.

Joseph
08-17-2010, 07:52 PM
RIP Bobby.

Dom Heffner
08-18-2010, 12:16 AM
Not sure if this was mentioned but Thomson was actually listed in the telephone book.

RedFanAlways1966
08-18-2010, 07:41 AM
Bobby fact - He lost his position in NYC to Willie Mays and in Milwaukee to Hank Aaron

WOW! Imagine how many people in those days were upset that a well known hitter was being replaced by some young unknown black guy (twice). 1,415 combined HRs later, I guess a couple of managers knew what they were doing.

cumberlandreds
08-18-2010, 07:44 AM
I never tire of hearing "The Call". Pure joy.

The was the best call of a walk off home run of all time. IMO,it is still the most famous HR in MLB history. I think he and Branca became friends, which is a great testament to both of their characters. R.I.P. Bobby Thomson. You will live forever in baseball lore.

redsmetz
08-18-2010, 10:50 AM
Here's the NY Times obit from this morning. Mays talks about Thomson helping him when he came up.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/18/sports/baseball/18thomson.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=thomson&st=cse

westofyou
08-18-2010, 12:11 PM
http://joeposnanski.com/JoeBlog/2010/08/17/the-giants-win-the-pennant/



Bobby Thomson was a very good baseball player. Bill James a few years back ranked him as the 57th-best right fielder in baseball history, a couple of slots behind Jackie Jensen, a few places ahead of Dave Justice. Thomson could run (he once led the National League in triples) and he had some power, and in his four prime years — 1949-1952 — he averaged 26 home runs, 100 RBIs, posted a 126 OPS+ and walked more often than he struck out.

Bobby Thomson, of course, is not especially well remembered for being a very good baseball player. There have been a lot of very good players. He is — like Don Larsen, like Roger Maris, like Joe Carter, like Kirk Gibson and even like Vic Wertz and Mitch Williams and Ralph Branca — remembered for a moment. A feeling. A memory that has launched books and movies and songs and the most passionate radio call that ever was: “The Giants win the pennant!”

redsmetz
08-19-2010, 12:00 PM
I've never heard this story about how the recording of the home run call came into being:

http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/08/19/thomson.memories/index.html?hpt=C2

It's a little like Vin Scully's call of the final inning of Koufax's perfect game. They decided to start recording at the end to capture history, really just a whim of Scully's & his engineer as a gift to Koufax. Of course, Scully's narrative, as I've said here, reads like prose.

But back to the subject, a son asks his mother to record the final inning since he wouldn't be home. Then he finds out the radio station hadn't recorded it. The rest is, as they say, history.

http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/08/19/thomson.memories/index.html?hpt=C2

westofyou
08-19-2010, 12:04 PM
Only a tiny minority of people actually heard the Hodges call live. Most heard Gordon McLendon's call on the Liberty Broadcasting System, which was carrying the game nationally.

Ernie Harwell did the TV, Red Barber the Dodgers and Hodges the Giants radio. The way I heard it was the guy taped it to taunt his Giants fans friends and he was Dodger fan, thus he ended up with a piece of history generated out of a spite attempt.

redsmetz
08-19-2010, 12:06 PM
Only a tiny minority of people actually heard the Hodges call live. Most heard Gordon McLendon's call on the Liberty Broadcasting System, which was carrying the game nationally.

Ernie Harwell did the TV, Red Barber the Dodgers and Hodges the Giants radio. The way I heard it was the guy taped it to taunt his Giants fans friends and he was Dodger fan, thus he ended up with a piece of history generated out of a spite attempt.

Actually they discuss that in the article. The guy said his dad had been a Giants fan since 1933 (he was 26 when the game was played), but that Hodges embellished the tale adding in the Dodgers fan bit.

SandyD
08-19-2010, 12:20 PM
Red Barber's call survives, and is an interesting contrast. I tried to find a link, but couldn't.

You know, I was on a cruise for the 2002 WS. Met a SF Giants fan, and we were talking about the WS. Something led me to mention Bobby Thompson, and his response was "who?" And when I repeated the call, his face was still blank.

My dad, who is not really a baseball fan at all, said he heard the end of that game on his way home from work. He couldn't remember who was calling it, but I'm sure it was the national broadcast.