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NorrisHopper30
09-15-2010, 11:11 PM
It was Bruce's 19th multihomer game, his fourth this season. He hit three in a 7-1 win over the Cubs on Aug. 27 at Great American Ball Park.

http://scores.espn.go.com/mlb/recap?gameId=300913117

How do you look up this stat anywhere? I have a tough time believing out of Bruce's 63 home runs he has had 19 multi hr games.

Krawhitham
09-15-2010, 11:21 PM
he has 8

http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/event_hr.cgi?n1=bruceja01&t=b

NorrisHopper30
09-15-2010, 11:41 PM
Thanks. Baseball-Reference is the best. Looked like a typo I guess 19, 9. Must have slipped on the 1.

FlightRick
09-16-2010, 02:23 AM
He actually does have 9, not 8. It's 8 2-HR games, but then there's 1 3-HR game.

After looking over that page, the odd stat anomaly that leaps out at me is that out of 63 home runs, 42 are solo jobs (67%). And 16 are 2-run jobs (25%). Only 5 combined 3- or 4-run jacks (8%). Compare that to the distribution of his plate appearances: no men on base (53%), one man on base (32%), multiple men on base (15%)... that's not a stat/comparision I've ever looked at before for other players, so I ask: is that common among all players to have a deviation between PA and HR skewed that much towards low-leverage situations?

It seems like it could be -- less concern by a pitcher equals more hittable pitches -- but I figure I'll ask...


Rick

Kingspoint
09-16-2010, 04:35 AM
He actually does have 9, not 8. It's 8 2-HR games, but then there's 1 3-HR game.

After looking over that page, the odd stat anomaly that leaps out at me is that out of 63 home runs, 42 are solo jobs (67%). And 16 are 2-run jobs (25%). Only 5 combined 3- or 4-run jacks (8%). Compare that to the distribution of his plate appearances: no men on base (53%), one man on base (32%), multiple men on base (15%)... that's not a stat/comparision I've ever looked at before for other players, so I ask: is that common among all players to have a deviation between PA and HR skewed that much towards low-leverage situations?

It seems like it could be -- less concern by a pitcher equals more hittable pitches -- but I figure I'll ask...


Rick

Younger hitters get more solo shots. If you're a power hitter, you have to be a lot more patient and disciplined to hit one out with men on base as opposing pitchers/catchers/managers just aren't going to give you a homerun pitch under those conditions. They'd rather take a chance on walking you.