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blumj
09-23-2010, 09:15 PM
Found in Bing Crosby's wine cellar and to be aired on MLBN in the offseason.



He knew he would want to watch the game later — if his Pirates won — so he hired a company to record Game 7 by kinescope, an early relative of the DVR, filming off a television monitor. The five-reel set, found in December in Crosby’s home, is the only known complete copy of the game, in which Pirates second baseman Bill Mazeroski hit a game-ending home run to beat the Yankees, 10-9. It is considered one of the greatest games ever played.


http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/24/sports/baseball/24crosby.html?_r=1&hp

Phhhl
09-23-2010, 09:19 PM
Now, that is awesome. I can't wait to see that.

SandyD
09-23-2010, 09:24 PM
Thanks, blumj. I'm going to have to "share" that. Look forward to seeing it.

blumj
09-23-2010, 10:06 PM
What a great story, too, you'd think he could have gone to the game, but he was so nervous and superstitious about it that he couldn't even watch on tv and had to leave the country?

Heath
09-23-2010, 10:27 PM
I still think it's strange to have someone get nervous over a Pirate game.

Then again, I guess I did this week.

vaticanplum
09-23-2010, 11:13 PM
This is incredible. I know a lot of people who are going to be very happy about this. Thanks for sharing blumj.

cumberlandreds
09-24-2010, 07:56 AM
Thanks for sharing that article. :thumbup: I'll be watching and recording it. Thanks to Bing too for having such foresight to keep old programming like this. Maybe they will find a copy of Game 5 of the 1972 NLCS? But Bing probably would have burned that tape since he was a Pirate fan.

Blimpie
09-24-2010, 03:49 PM
Amazing story... never knew Crosby was part owner of team.

westofyou
09-24-2010, 06:59 PM
Amazing story... never knew Crosby was part owner of team.

Yep, he and Hope (who owned a piece of the Indians) had some baseball fetishes post WW2 IIRC they were also kicking the Reds tires too.

The story is AWESOME, mostly because as it notes TV stations just reused and tossed stuff away back then, we're lucky folks like Lucille Ball were smart enough to film their episodes, most TV shows were live and like Mike TV in Willy Wonka, they just ended up as a bunch of particles in the air once the show was over.

In college I took extensive TV courses and have seen many a classic that was Kinescoped, not very quality, but history is not about quality now is it?

Chip R
09-24-2010, 08:04 PM
The story is AWESOME, mostly because as it notes TV stations just reused and tossed stuff away back then, we're lucky folks like Lucille Ball were smart enough to film their episodes, most TV shows were live and like Mike TV in Willy Wonka, they just ended up as a bunch of particles in the air once the show was over.


We had a thread similar to this a few months ago. Someone wondered why there were no Reds games out there from the Crosley era. That's a big reason why.

Brutus
09-24-2010, 08:23 PM
This is awesome. I'm getting to the point where I'm really wanting to embrace the history of the game. This will be a great experience to see.

KittyDuran
09-24-2010, 09:23 PM
Yep, he and Hope (who owned a piece of the Indians) had some baseball fetishes post WW2 IIRC they were also kicking the Reds tires too.


Some dialogue from "The Road to Bali" movie (and the only "Road" picture filmed in color).

On the boat to Bali...Bing (George) has just finished singing a song to Dorothy (Lala) and talks about leaving her and going back to the US. They're topside... Bob (Harold) is down below counting some buried treasure...



Bing (George): I've been away a long, long time. I got to get back. Catch some ballgames, see how the Pirates are doing.
Dorothy (Lala): You still have pirates in America?
Bing (George): Yeah, but they're nothing to be afraid of, probably hiding in the cellar someplace. Bing (George): But its a fantastic place the USA, Lala. Just take any town. Take a town for instance, the garden spot of North America, the lush, picturesque Riviera of the Middle West...Toledo, Ohio.
Dorothy (Lala): Toledo, Ohio, Toledo, Ohio. Oh, it sounds beautiful. Such a musical name.
Bing (George): Oh, its a musical town. There's a jukebox in every bowling alley.
Bing (George): Lala, will you go to America with me?

(Harold starts up the stairs to the deck and stops to listen in on the conversation.)

Dorothy (Lala): George!
Bing (George): I mean marry me and go to America, of course.
Dorothy (Lala): Oh, it would be wonderful. But what about Harold?
Bing (George): Well, We could adopt him.
Dorothy (Lala): Adopt him?
Bing (George): Of course, we'd have to send him away to go to school.
Dorothy (Lala): Its a little late for that, isn't it?
Bing (George): Oh no baby, he has to go sometime, that boy...

(Harold has heard enough... and confronts George)

Bob (Harold): That's enough! Why you collapsible Como you! You and your Pirates...
Bing (George): What do you want to do? Brag about the Cleveland Indians?
Bob (Harold) At least they're in the major leagues!
Bing (George): Go on, they throw underhanded.


:)

Blimpie
09-24-2010, 09:39 PM
Yep, he and Hope (who owned a piece of the Indians) had some baseball fetishes post WW2 IIRC they were also kicking the Reds tires too.

The story is AWESOME, mostly because as it notes TV stations just reused and tossed stuff away back then, we're lucky folks like Lucille Ball were smart enough to film their episodes, most TV shows were live and like Mike TV in Willy Wonka, they just ended up as a bunch of particles in the air once the show was over.

In college I took extensive TV courses and have seen many a classic that was Kinescoped, not very quality, but history is not about quality now is it?...and it is also cool that Crosby still had the sense enough to have the original footage digitized to the DVD format in his waning years.

Roy Tucker
09-25-2010, 10:22 AM
Crosby died in 1977 so I'm not sure he was the one to digitize his tapes.

But Crosby was very interested and involved in recording technology. He was an early investor in Ampex who developed the first commercial reel-to-reel recorder.

pedro
09-25-2010, 10:48 AM
Crosby died in 1977 so I'm not sure he was the one to digitize his tapes.

But Crosby was very interested and involved in recording technology. He was an early investor in Ampex who developed the first commercial reel-to-reel recorder.

I don't think they were digitized at all.

blumj
09-25-2010, 01:19 PM
Read the article if you're interested, it says they found reels of 16 millimeter film in a cannister labeled 1960 World Series and screened it with a projector.

westofyou
09-25-2010, 05:14 PM
Read the article if you're interested, it says they found reels of 16 millimeter film in a cannister labeled 1960 World Series and screened it with a projector.

Right, MLB digitized them, that said, I'm sensing Blimpie had tongue planted firmly in his cheek when he typed that, especially since Bing died when Carter was President... before the walkman was invented, much alone digital video.

oregonred
09-25-2010, 05:39 PM
what a great story. Thanks WOY for the insight on why most of the old reels from live TV in the 50s and 60s don't exist.

westofyou
09-25-2010, 06:19 PM
what a great story. Thanks WOY for the insight on why most of the old reels from live TV in the 50s and 60s don't exist.

In 1965 Video Tape was invented, then many stations would use the video for interviews, small time shows and even taping baseball games. However the video tape was also like a DVR (compared to a DVD) a format that can be re-used, and at the time it was expensive, so they taped over games, interviews and awesome pregame shows like Kiners Korner before the Mets game.

We live in an era rich in data saturation, everything is being saved now, it however is useless unless attached to a rich meta-data solution that enables that data to surface in searches.

Times they are changing... I'd love to see a pre Babe Ruth era game in full.

Blimpie
09-26-2010, 10:17 AM
I don't think they were digitized at all.My bad, I completely mis-read that last sentence of the paragraph about how it was found in the cellar:


The film had not degraded and has been transferred to DVD.

I thought it said "...and had been transferred to DVD."

I assumed that he left instructions for somebody from his family to preserve it in a way they thought was best.

Sea Ray
09-27-2010, 02:41 PM
I find it interesting that they just recently found this film. Are they still going through his stuff 33 yrs later?

I thought I'd seen a tape of Mazeroski's HR. Am I incorrect? I thought there was an existing tape of that game.

Roy Tucker
09-27-2010, 02:47 PM
We live in an era rich in data saturation, everything is being saved now, it however is useless unless attached to a rich meta-data solution that enables that data to surface in searches.



I'm waiting for augmented reality to hit baseball.

http://www.textually.org/textually/archives/2010/06/10/augmented-reality-b-03.jpeg

cumberlandreds
09-27-2010, 03:28 PM
I find it interesting that they just recently found this film. Are they still going through his stuff 33 yrs later?

I thought I'd seen a tape of Mazeroski's HR. Am I incorrect? I thought there was an existing tape of that game.

Apparently Bing had loads of tapes from his TV and radio shows that he kept. No one had gone through them all apparently until recently.

I am sure that is off a news reel tape from 1960. No one knew the entire game existed on tape until now.

blumj
11-25-2010, 08:09 AM
I just saw the promo on MLBN, December 15 at 8 PM.


Bob Costas joins other panel members Bill Mazeroski, Dick Groat and Bobby Richardson to discuss a recently unearthed copy of Game 7 of the 1960 World Series.

http://mlb.mlb.com/network/schedule/?ymd=20101215

Tony Cloninger
11-25-2010, 11:22 AM
MLB Network still has not shown any of the Reds-A's games from 1972. They are in good condition in regards to games 4-5. Also Game 3 of Philly at Cincy 1976 as well.