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redsmetz
03-23-2011, 09:11 AM
Just got a CNN news email indicating that Elizabeth Taylor has died at the age of 79.

OldRightHander
03-23-2011, 09:16 AM
http://content.usatoday.com/communities/ondeadline/post/2011/03/abc-actress-elizabeth-taylor-dies-at-age-79/1

redsmetz
03-23-2011, 09:24 AM
http://http://content.usatoday.com/communities/ondeadline/post/2011/03/abc-actress-elizabeth-taylor-dies-at-age-79/1

Lets see if this one works.

http://content.usatoday.com/communities/entertainment/post/2011/03/elizabeth-taylor-dies-at-age-79/1

OldRightHander
03-23-2011, 09:34 AM
Lets see if this one works.

http://content.usatoday.com/communities/entertainment/post/2011/03/elizabeth-taylor-dies-at-age-79/1


Oops. Have to be careful when pasting.

Kingspoint
03-23-2011, 12:37 PM
So sad.

What joys and pleasures she's brought to so many people's lives.

It's truly a very sad day.

Thank you, Liz, for all you've done.

A truly great actress!

Her body of work is equal to anyone's, male or female.

Kingspoint
03-23-2011, 12:59 PM
YouTube - Elizabeth Taylor winning Best Actress for "Butterfield 8" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nSaSkMp7-X8&feature=player_detailpage)


But before the 1961 ceremony, she was hospitalized from a nearly fatal bout with pneumonia and Taylor underwent a tracheotomy. The scar was bandaged when she appeared at the Oscars to accept her best actress trophy for "Butterfield 8."

To a standing ovation, she hobbled to the stage. "I don't really know how to express my great gratitude," she said in an emotional speech. "I guess I will just have to thank you with all my heart." It was one of the most dramatic moments in Academy Awards history.

medford
03-23-2011, 03:23 PM
I'll always remember Paul Harvey's "the Rest of the story" about a young baby born covered in hair (which apparently we all have during development, but typically falls off prior to the actual birth) and eyes closed shut. The doctors assured the baby's parents that the hair would fall off in short order, and the eyes should open up. Sure enough a week or so later, the covering of body hair was gone, and they bright, beautiful eyes fully opened to the world. This baby was off course Elizabeth Taylor.

Kingspoint
03-23-2011, 08:36 PM
...

RedFanAlways1966
03-25-2011, 07:03 AM
Sad news.

You know (and not meant in bad taste)... I am 45. Liz was a bit before my time. My perception of her at my age (and as I grew up) was always one of a very bizarre and strange lady. All the marriages, the friendship with Michael Jackson, the illnesses, the (non-movie) stories of her past. I just always thought this lady is strange and seems to be be playing with a deck of cards that does not contain 52 cards. Of course I have no idea, but that was always my perception.

medford
03-25-2011, 08:21 AM
Sad news.

You know (and not meant in bad taste)... I am 45. Liz was a bit before my time. My perception of her at my age (and as I grew up) was always one of a very bizarre and strange lady. All the marriages, the friendship with Michael Jackson, the illnesses, the (non-movie) stories of her past. I just always thought this lady is strange and seems to be be playing with a deck of cards that does not contain 52 cards. Of course I have no idea, but that was always my perception.

As a day away from 34, I know exactly where you're coming from. In fact, the first time I saw some clips of some of her old movies, I was blown away how pretty she was in her prime. To me, she was always the slightly odd famour person who did a bunch for aids and was in and out of marriages faster than a 16 year old boy goes thru girlfriends. I know she was so much more than that, but that is the reality of what I knew of her growing up. I was never even sure why she was even famous to begin with. I think its the sad reality w/ people who die young tending to get memorialized much greater than those that age. When you die young like James Dean, Kurt Cobain, Marylin Monroe, JFK, etc... you'll forever be remembered in your prime, before stories leak out about any strange habits, or your youthful looks that made you famous to begin with fade away with age.

redhawkfish
03-25-2011, 08:27 AM
Sad news.

You know (and not meant in bad taste)... I am 45. Liz was a bit before my time. My perception of her at my age (and as I grew up) was always one of a very bizarre and strange lady. All the marriages, the friendship with Michael Jackson, the illnesses, the (non-movie) stories of her past. I just always thought this lady is strange and seems to be be playing with a deck of cards that does not contain 52 cards. Of course I have no idea, but that was always my perception.

I am also your age and these are my recollections also. My father sure talked about her a lot though!;)

redsmetz
03-25-2011, 09:07 AM
Here's a story outlining the best and the worst of Taylor's performances. For those of you unfamiliar with her best work, I'd recommend checking out some of these flicks. I may have to get Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and have something for both my wife and I to watch. Heck, I'm trying to figure out the best way to say that if I had to look like another guy, Paul Newman would be my choice.

I'd also recommend National Velvet for Taylor's performance there. She was just twelve when she made that one. When I first saw it, I was completely unaware that she had started out so young. She made her first movie at age 10.

http://hamptonroads.com/2011/03/elizabeth-taylor-screen-legends-top-movies

Unassisted
03-25-2011, 10:03 AM
I was in a room full of people in their early to mid 20s when I learned of Elizabeth Taylor's death. NONE of them knew who she was. Looking at imdb, her last credit there was in 2001, for a couple of projects I've never heard of, so I guess it makes sense.

gonelong
03-25-2011, 10:16 AM
I was in a room full of people in their early to mid 20s when I learned of Elizabeth Taylor's death. NONE of them knew who she was. Looking at imdb, her last credit there was in 2001, for a couple of projects I've never heard of, so I guess it makes sense.

She really hasn't been in the news much in the last decade. Not surprising they didn't know who she was.

GL

Scrap Irony
03-25-2011, 10:25 AM
Here's a story outlining the best and the worst of Taylor's performances. For those of you unfamiliar with her best work, I'd recommend checking out some of these flicks. I may have to get Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and have something for both my wife and I to watch. Heck, I'm trying to figure out the best way to say that if I had to look like another guy, Paul Newman would be my choice.

I'd also recommend National Velvet for Taylor's performance there. She was just twelve when she made that one. When I first saw it, I was completely unaware that she had started out so young. She made her first movie at age 10.

http://hamptonroads.com/2011/03/elizabeth-taylor-screen-legends-top-movies

I always thought she was among the most overrated actresses in movie history. Her work on Williams' "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" was good, but, then again, with that dialogue, almost any actress can look good. Jessica Lange was much, much better in that role, IMO.

Other than that, Taylor was so-so at best. Her Cleopatra was nigh-unwatchable. National Velvet's dialogue is clunky and she delivers each line like a veteran soap opera actress.

Too, late in her career, she did absolutely nothing to stretch out or really display her supposed talent. The last decent role she took was in Giant.

Heck, I'd argue Marilyn Monroe had better acting chops (or at least choices) than did Taylor.

oneupper
03-25-2011, 10:33 AM
She really hasn't been in the news much in the last decade. Not surprising they didn't know who she was.

GL

As a parent of a twenty year-old and teenager, I've tried to help my kids get some background on the "classics" from my youth and before.
They might not know Elizabeth Taylor's full story, but they have an idea who she was. Same goes for Richard Burton, Clark Gable, Cary Grant, Paul Newman, Audrey Hepburn, Natalie Wood (a fav around here), Bogart, etc, etc.

Sweetstop
03-25-2011, 12:46 PM
scrap irony....i'd say e.t. did a bit of acting in "who's afraid of virginia wolfe", joined r.b. for some credible shakespeare in "taming of the shrew", both of which came after "giant". i thought her oscar-worthy in "butterfield 8" also.

you came down on her acting chops pretty hard. :)

Sweetstop
03-25-2011, 01:04 PM
the younger generations, at least those members of such who claim to be film fans, owe themselves the pleasure of watching lots and lots of old movies, both good and bad...i'm talking about 50's and before. just settle in with tcm for a nice visit, take a film course or go to terrific theaters that show the classics...one of which is where i took my children to see e.t.'s "national velvet" among many others, when they were youngsters.

makes me sad that all the larger than life stars of my youth are gone or going..hopefully, their film legacies won't soon follow suit.

redsmetz
03-25-2011, 02:40 PM
For those interested in seeing some of Taylor movie's, the Esquire just announced on Facebook that they'll be doing a festival in early April. It's always great to see some of these older films on a bigger screen, although in many cases, they're nowhere near as big as the original screens.

http://www.facebook.com/#!/event.php?eid=155508907842658

westofyou
03-25-2011, 02:44 PM
the younger generations, at least those members of such who claim to be film fans, owe themselves the pleasure of watching lots and lots of old movies, both good and bad...i'm talking about 50's and before. just settle in with tcm for a nice visit, take a film course or go to terrific theaters that show the classics...one of which is where i took my children to see e.t.'s "national velvet" among many others, when they were youngsters.

makes me sad that all the larger than life stars of my youth are gone or going..hopefully, their film legacies won't soon follow suit.

I'm of the opinion that most "films" made prior to the era of Summer Blockbusters trump 99% of the films post 1985.

And here's a good explanation of why

http://www.gq.com/entertainment/movies-and-tv/201102/the-day-the-movies-died-mark-harris?printable=true

reds1869
03-25-2011, 02:54 PM
I'm of the opinion that most "films" made prior to the era of Summer Blockbusters trump 99% of the films post 1985.

And here's a good explanation of why

http://www.gq.com/entertainment/movies-and-tv/201102/the-day-the-movies-died-mark-harris?printable=true

There was an article in the most recent City Beat on this very topic.

http://www.citybeat.com/cincinnati/article-22936-a-movie-proposal.html

Kingspoint
03-25-2011, 04:38 PM
I always thought she was among the most overrated actresses in movie history.

Thankfully, you're in the extreme minority there.

Kingspoint
03-25-2011, 04:40 PM
Taylor's greatness was before she followed Richard Burton into his addiction. Her body of work before she turned 34 has no equal.

Red in Chicago
03-25-2011, 05:36 PM
Sad news.

You know (and not meant in bad taste)... I am 45. Liz was a bit before my time. My perception of her at my age (and as I grew up) was always one of a very bizarre and strange lady. All the marriages, the friendship with Michael Jackson, the illnesses, the (non-movie) stories of her past. I just always thought this lady is strange and seems to be be playing with a deck of cards that does not contain 52 cards. Of course I have no idea, but that was always my perception.

We are the same age. I couldn't agree more with you.

Mutaman
03-25-2011, 05:45 PM
Sad news.

You know (and not meant in bad taste)... I am 45. Liz was a bit before my time. My perception of her at my age (and as I grew up) was always one of a very bizarre and strange lady. All the marriages, the friendship with Michael Jackson, the illnesses, the (non-movie) stories of her past. I just always thought this lady is strange and seems to be be playing with a deck of cards that does not contain 52 cards. Of course I have no idea, but that was always my perception.

This interests me. Don't most people own tvs and watch movies? You mean to tell me there are people out there who have never seen "National Velvet", "Giant", or "A Place in the Sun"? What are the odds? Go to Blockbuster or Netflix immediatly- you have missed some great entertainment.

757690
03-25-2011, 06:26 PM
I'm of the opinion that most "films" made prior to the era of Summer Blockbusters trump 99% of the films post 1985.

And here's a good explanation of why

http://www.gq.com/entertainment/movies-and-tv/201102/the-day-the-movies-died-mark-harris?printable=true

I stopped reading after the article declared Inception an "exceptional movie."

Not to derail the thread, but I really don't think there is much difference between Inception and the movies that the article is ripping.

But I agree with the premise, just not the example the article uses.

redsmetz
03-25-2011, 07:43 PM
This interests me. Don't most people own tvs and watch movies? You mean to tell me there are people out there who have never seen "National Velvet", "Giant", or "A Place in the Sun"? What are the odds? Go to Blockbuster or Netflix immediatly- you have missed some great entertainment.

I've never seen a couple of these, but that's because there's a ton of movies to watch. But even in my 20's (late 70's to mid 80's), there were various theaters here in town that would show older movies. The Movies (originally Moviola) where the Shakespeare Company is now, put out an entire calendar monthly with a combination of old movies, foreign and/or art flicks. We went all the time. My first two dates with my wife were to see Fantasia at the Hyde Park Theater and Fiddler on the Roof, probably at Hyde Park too. We'd go down to the Emory to see movies on the huge screen. I wish they'd reopen that. One summer before we had AC, we took our kids to see Laurel & Hardy there and then The Greatest Show on Earth (seeing that train wreck on whatever width that screen was is amazing). And, of course, with Netflix, it's all available.

westofyou
03-25-2011, 11:15 PM
I stopped reading after the article declared Inception an "exceptional movie."

Not to derail the thread, but I really don't think there is much difference between Inception and the movies that the article is ripping.

But I agree with the premise, just not the example the article uses.

FWIW I have haven't seen it yet myself. But the tone and the reference points ring true to me. I went to film school, I've seen a lot of films over the years, from all over the world and the story is the key, without it you're just dealing up effects.

757690
03-26-2011, 03:57 PM
FWIW I have haven't seen it yet myself. But the tone and the reference points ring true to me. I went to film school, I've seen a lot of films over the years, from all over the world and the story is the key, without it you're just dealing up effects.

I completely agree, and I agree with the article that the studios no longer care about the story, just the action and effects. They used to, but then realized it was easier to just buy the good indies that had been tested by film festivals than risk making any on their own.

I just think that Inception was successful not because of the story, which most people didn't even understand, but because it had the most impressive special effects and action sequences most people had ever seen. I still liked it, but not because of the story, which I thought the story was full of holes and very derivative of anything Phillip Dick ever wrote.

Anyway, I am very excited because I just joined Hulu+, which has a large number of the Criterion Collection for free (well, $7.99 a month). Great way to catch classics I missed and see my favorites again, whenever I want. Just watched The 39 Steps and Walkabout, two of my favorites. :)

Kingspoint
03-27-2011, 02:47 AM
FWIW I have haven't seen it yet myself. But the tone and the reference points ring true to me. I went to film school, I've seen a lot of films over the years, from all over the world and the story is the key, without it you're just dealing up effects.

I like going to Fox Tower because they'll always be some movies there that will never play anywhere else within 150 miles. That's where I saw "Nora's Will" a couple of months ago. Very good movie. Stopped at the Hollywood Theatre last night at 10:00 just to watch whatever was going to be shown next, and we were shocked that on a Friday Night, the last showtime was at 9:00. I like going to a movie, especially an independent or foreign film where I know nothing about it. I'm usually pleasantly surprised.

I don't like "special effects" movies per se (not special effects themselves, but movies that are about special effects like those Keanu Reeves ones or "Indiscretion" or things like that; nor do I like movies with unnecessary violence in them. "Saving Private Ryan" = necessary violence. "No Country for Old Men" = unnecessary violence (lacked creative writing skills).

RedsBaron
03-28-2011, 09:26 AM
As a day away from 34, I know exactly where you're coming from. In fact, the first time I saw some clips of some of her old movies, I was blown away how pretty she was in her prime. To me, she was always the slightly odd famour person who did a bunch for aids and was in and out of marriages faster than a 16 year old boy goes thru girlfriends. I know she was so much more than that, but that is the reality of what I knew of her growing up. I was never even sure why she was even famous to begin with. I think its the sad reality w/ people who die young tending to get memorialized much greater than those that age. When you die young like James Dean, Kurt Cobain, Marylin Monroe, JFK, etc... you'll forever be remembered in your prime, before stories leak out about any strange habits, or your youthful looks that made you famous to begin with fade away with age.

James Dean and Marlon Brando illustrate your point. They were contemporaries, Brando being seven years older, who each reached their peak in the 1950s, iconic actors whose styles were often compared to each other. Dean died at age 24 and remains in the public mind a forever young legend. Brando lived to age 80 and spent most of the last half of his life overweight and rarely seeming to care about his performance, the prime of his youth not as vividly remembered.
I am a big Natalie Wood fan. Her tragic death at age 43 kept her memory as that of someone still in her prime, even though her most memorable roles were a decade behind her by the time she perished. Elizabeth Taylor was blessed with a long life but her final decades blurred the memory of her prime.