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Cedric
06-29-2011, 10:55 PM
A secretary at work asked me today why I loved the Reds so much. I answered in about five minutes and I'm curious what you all think.

Some of my answer revolved around nostalgia. Some of my answer revolved around the fact baseball isn't an "instant gratification sport."

MikeThierry
06-29-2011, 11:00 PM
There is no clock. It is the perfect summer game. I also don't think any other sport has the emotional appeal to it as baseball does. When I smell the leather of the glove, it takes me back to my childhood playing catch with my bro. That hotdog smell at ball parks brings you back to your first game as a child. It is also a timeless game. A .300 hitter is just as excellent now as it was in 1900. There are just so many things to love about baseball.

Cedric
06-29-2011, 11:04 PM
There is no clock. It is the perfect summer game. I also don't think any other sport has the emotional appeal to it as baseball does. When I smell the leather of the glove, it takes me back to my childhood playing catch with my bro. That hotdog smell at ball parks brings you back to your first game as a child. It is also a timeless game. A .300 hitter is just as excellent now as it was in 1900. There are just so many things to love about baseball.

I still remember my grandpa sitting in his summer house complaining about Marty Brenneman. "Just call the game Marty."

He loved Marty though. He had the right to complain when Marty was going off on some non baseball tangent. I remember my grandpa a lot when I think of the Reds, which is often. I think the way baseball flows through generations makes it special.

cinreds21
06-29-2011, 11:06 PM
I honestly don't know what it is. The game is just so different from any other sport. How detailed it is and how much you have to think, not just on the field, but off the field with everything that goes into it. Having to look over, not just your big league team, but an entire minor league system. I just love the game and it feels home to me for some reason. I feel in love with it at 14-years-old and have never looked back. Baseball is a major part of my life and will only get bigger as my career starts.

MikeThierry
06-29-2011, 11:12 PM
I still remember my grandpa sitting in his summer house complaining about Marty Brenneman. "Just call the game Marty."

He loved Marty though. He had the right to complain when Marty was going off on some non baseball tangent. I remember my grandpa a lot when I think of the Reds, which is often. I think the way baseball flows through generations makes it special.

Cedric you bring up something that I think everyone has experienced, which is awesome. I think everyone's grandfather had or has a subject that they have a "wild hair" on. With one of my grandfathers, I always got a laugh when he ranted about how Jim Edmonds would purposely let up on a ball to hot dog it. It was great entertainment seeing him yelling at the TV. I miss those times.

westofyou
06-29-2011, 11:31 PM
Baseball is not like the other games, it's not a back and forth sport, it doesn't allow random substitution, it's not divided in half's, quarters, periods, sets or matches. Baseball employs numerous amount of different approaches and thus different players can fit these scenarios, it has more changes that occur naturally than the other sports, it's longer, has more games and each season plays as a role in a play of your life.

It's intertwined with America and its growth, it's a subsection of history that is deep and worthy of loads and loads of words.

It's poetry, it's rock n roll, it's snow on Christmas morning.

It's not a bad thing to follow at all

reds1869
06-29-2011, 11:33 PM
So much of my life has been wrapped up in the game that it is hard to pinpoint an answer. I love everything about baseball. One thing that certainly stands out is the connections made with those close to me, including those who are no longer around. Baseball is a generational passion in my family, more so than any other sport.

camisadelgolf
06-29-2011, 11:33 PM
A game-winning home run is nice and all, but because I'm sadistic, I watch it for things like this:
http://photos-b.ak.facebook.com/photos-ak-sf2p/v353/184/24/531577068/n531577068_2017769_7619.jpg

*BaseClogger*
06-29-2011, 11:36 PM
Baseball is not like the other games, it's not a back and forth sport, it doesn't allow random substitution, it's not divided in half's, quarters, periods, sets or matches. Baseball employs numerous amount of different approaches and thus different players can fit these scenarios, it has more changes that occur naturally than the other sports, it's longer, has more games and each season plays as a role in a play of your life.

It's intertwined with America and its growth, it's a subsection of history that is deep and worthy of loads and loads of words.

It's poetry, it's rock n roll, it's snow on Christmas morning.

It's not a bad thing to follow at all

I was waiting for your response. Your descriptions always bring a smile to my face and make me want to quote them when I explain my love of the game to others...

camisadelgolf
06-29-2011, 11:37 PM
I was waiting for your response. Your descriptions always bring a smile to my face and make me want to quote them when I explain my love of the game to others...
http://gabezimmer.com/polysemantics/fullSize/Brown_Nose_WEB.jpg

*BaseClogger*
06-29-2011, 11:39 PM
http://blog.therisetothetop.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/jerk-pic-1.jpg

VR
06-29-2011, 11:54 PM
I was the youngest of 6 kids...and knew my dad loved baseball, so I had a special attraction.
And then the Big Red Machine happened.....Monday Night Baseball.......Saturdays with Tony Kubek and Joe Garagiloa. I was an Iowa boy...and they were the team to follow.

Foster and Bench were gods.....couldn't get enough of every box score and highlight, at 10:20 local time. I was a stat junkie....couldn't wait to get the Sunday paper with the updated stats of my Reds. I kept a notebook in 8th grade to keep a running tally of BA's & ERAs.

We were dirt poor growing up, and my dad promised me $100 if I ever hit a homerun. I was a tall, skinny kid growing up, and we played at a big field. I hit a 420 foot bomb in 1984, and my dad couldn't have been happier to go to the bank, withdraw a C-note, and present it to me. The proudest moment w/ my pops.


Still today, I wonder why I still love the Reds. I have never been to a home game....and probably hold the record for most Reds games attended without ever attending in Cincy. I'm hooked, I can't explain it.


I love watching baseball, following it on Gameday, TV, RZ. Playing it, coaching it, being a random person in the stadium. I feel like I'm a better person when I'm at a game.



My dad, a Cardinals fan from the 30's, passed away in 91, before the Reds/Cards were fiery competitors....I can only imagine what that would look like.

Always Red
06-30-2011, 12:08 AM
I didn't choose baseball, it chose me. One of my grandfathers played minor league ball with Dizzy Dean. My mom went to West Hi with Pete Rose. I learned my left from my right hand by which was LF and RF. My dad grew up just on the other side of the hill (Bald Knob) of Crosley Field. My earliest memories as a kid were climbing that hill with my Dad to look over the Mill Creek Valley at the old ballpark, and going to games with him and my grandfathers. The shock of the brightness of that green grass, the smell of those Ibold cigars, well, it's something I will have with me always.

I've often said on this site that my own idea of heaven is listening to (not cranky old but young) Marty and Joe on the radio, while sitting in my backyard, sipping a cold one on a hot summer night. In my late teens and early 20's, when I was young and stupid, me and my dad couldn't talk about anything. Except baseball. We both loved baseball, and sometimes, often times, it was the only thing we had in common.

Baseball is my family history, it's been a constant throughout my entire life. I do not have sons, but my own daughters love the game, and love going with me to the games. For me now, baseball is release, it's how I get my mind off of my work and relax, it's an escape from the real world. I dont get too upset now that the Reds are struggling; i enjoy the fact that "struggling" means 2 games over .500 halfway through the year! Baseball has always been there, throughout my entire life. It's the single one common thread that has run through my whole life. It was my first love, and it's something that I know I will love until the day I die.

Like many of you, I don't even need to have seen or heard the game to be able to replay it in my mind. Looking at a box score the next day, you can easily figure out what happened, and replay the game in your mind. Try that with any other game.

Baseball has never let me down. Ever. I am away on vacation right now, and had fun watching 2 teenaged boys tossing ball in the street. When the big boys in the majors complain and strike, we always have college ball, minor league ball, high school ball and knothole baseball. Baseball is also unique to the history of this country. I love history, American history, and I love baseball history, and they both go hand in hand. Abner Doubleday did not invent baseball, but he was a Union general who loved baseball. There is so much you can learn, and happily for me, so much more I can learn about the game, and the history of the game.

Ron Madden
06-30-2011, 04:08 AM
The Reds and Baseball have always played a huge part in my life.

The Reds are in my blood, in my memories, in my hopes for the future.

Mario-Rijo
06-30-2011, 04:30 AM
I guess for alot of the reasons people have stated here already. But I know when I was a kid I didn't love it nearly as much. Actually I got quite bored with it often because I didn't always "get it" and mainly only watched/listened because my grandpa did. But at some point the fever just struck me, and stuck to me. I think it was honestly the Eddie Milner/Gary Redus version that 1st started to peak my interest. And then Eric Davis happened and my excitement jumped a few notches and I began to understand the game more little by little. All of a sudden Barry Larkin came along and I was at an all time high, and then came Spuds, the Nasty Boys and Rijo, etc. to add personality to the grace I was drawn to. What a concoction and then the winning began and I was hooked forever more.

It's kinda funny what you really remember after many years of watching it. I have forgotten much but whenever I am asked what draws me I think of Barry going deep in the hole to his right or Eric with that smooth, rhythmic pre-pitch batting motion transitioning to an explosively awesome swing. So I guess you could say I was drawn to the wow factor, the beauty & grace with which the best played the game and I stayed for the intrigue. Well all that and Grandpa...he loved it and it loved him back so I owed it to the game to give it enough of a chance to stick to me.

AtomicDumpling
06-30-2011, 06:08 AM
Cedric you bring up something that I think everyone has experienced, which is awesome. I think everyone's grandfather had or has a subject that they have a "wild hair" on. With one of my grandfathers, I always got a laugh when he ranted about how Jim Edmonds would purposely let up on a ball to hot dog it. It was great entertainment seeing him yelling at the TV. I miss those times.

Your grandpa nailed it right on the head. That is my biggest pet peeve too. I can't stand it when outfielders slow down so they can dive for the "spectacular" play. I hate it when they dive after they catch the ball. It happens all the time these days and I blame it on Jim Edmonds and ESPN's Plays of the Day. :bang:

I just laugh when I see a guy misjudge the ball, break the wrong way, twist and turn, leap in the air, stretch out his glove and snowcone the ball. Then the crowd goes wild and the broadcasters holler and gush over the fantastic play. :laugh:

The best fielders make it look easy, unfortunately that doesn't get you on the Sportscenter highlight reels.

I prefer Scott Rolen's brand of rock-steady excellence to Brandon Phillips' brand of look-at-me excellence. Rolen can make an extremely difficult play look routine, Phillips can make a fairly routine play look flashy. (I still love Phillips so don't hate me for saying it.)

Give me Dave Concepcion over Ozzie Smith.
Give me Cal Ripken over Derek Jeter.
Give me Drew Stubbs over Jim Edmonds.

The first two seconds of a long drive to centerfield are far more important than the last second. Judging the ball quickly off the bat and speedily taking the correct route are what make a great outfielder -- not crashing into walls or sprawling on the grass. Drew Stubbs would be standing and waiting for balls that Jim Edmonds would dive for -- yet Jim Edmonds would get all the attention.

_Sir_Charles_
06-30-2011, 08:10 AM
It's a constant link to my childhood. It's something you can pass on to your kids. The smell of a glove to your nose. That first look as you pass through the tunnel to see how unbelievably green that grass is for the first time. The fact that you don't have to be some Adonis to play it, a 5 foot 2 guy can play it just as well as a 6 foot 2 guy. The way no two games are like another. The pace, it's not all helter skelter but more relaxed...it's a game you can sit in the bleachers on a nice sunny day and just relax and enjoy.

Why do I love baseball. Because it's PERFECT. Poetry in motion.

MikeThierry
06-30-2011, 08:48 AM
AtomicDumpling, I think you bring up something that is great about baseball. It is the perfect sport to argue about. Sure, there are those sports arguments in hockey, basketball, and football but none so passionate as those in baseball. There are small things that irk us that we argue about and make a huge point to do so and then there are the big things. It is the perfect sport to just sit around with a group of people and gawk away at stats, which player is better, what team was the best team in the history of the game, etc.

Reds Freak
06-30-2011, 12:00 PM
Why do I cry every time at the end of Field of Dreams? Why do I smile every time I go by a park filled with kids playing baseball? Why did I jump and down like an idiot last year when the Reds clinched the division? Why is playing catch one of my favorite things to do in the world?

I have no idea.

dfs
06-30-2011, 12:08 PM
Walk around Kings Island and look at the faces.
Walk around GAB even during a down year and look at the faces.

Notice where folks are smiling.

SunDeck
06-30-2011, 12:20 PM
Baseball has changed a lot over the years, but it is essentially the same game it was when my dad played it in the 40s. You can't say that about many things. I also like the fact that it's still essentially a pastoral game; made for farmer's fields and empty lots. I'm nostalgic and I value the simplicity of a bat, a ball, a glove, and a gathering of kids at a sandlot. I also think it's pretty cool to know that when I was a kid I had the exact same dreams of every grownup who gets to make a living from the game. The only thing that separates us is their god given talents, but other than that, we share the soul of the game.

cumberlandreds
06-30-2011, 02:28 PM
Baseball is a bridge to the past for me. Not just my past but to history going back to the early 1900's. Baseball really hasn't changed in over 100 years. You can compare players from the turn of the 20th century to the turn of the 21st century. It's one of the easiest games to watch but the most complex at the same time. When you learn to watch the game within the game it comes to full fruition to you. Every summer since I was eight years old I have been consumed by it. There may have been a few summers I didn't follow as closely after the 1994 strike but I still checked the standings regulary until I slowly came back in full. I can't imagine a time without it now and I don't expect I ever will. I always compared each to season to a book. You have a beginning of getting to know the teams and players. A middle where the plot takes shape and thickens. Then the ending where it all comes together and you feel satisfied until the next spring when all starts again.
What I like best is this hope:
The game itself has the potential to defeat time. If a teams keeps getting hits and doesn't make the last out then it can last forever. But eventually and always it does have an ending. That last out is made. Just like life. We think it will last forever but it doesn't. It will end someday even though,like a baseball game,we hope it doesn't. I'll be a baseball fan until that end, when the last ebb of life finishes that game for me.

WebScorpion
06-30-2011, 05:42 PM
In so many ways, baseball is a metaphor for life. In the way that a good player can become great through hard work and perseverance. In the way a hitter can swing and miss at a third strike, but next time he sees that same pitch he strikes it solidly, learning from his mistake. In the way you can take the ten best players and put them on the field where they cannot defeat a group of lesser players who play as a team. I could go on forever.

These are just a few of the things that I love about baseball, but I'd say the main reason I originally was hooked on baseball is that I grew up in Cincinnati in the 1970's and my grandpa had season tickets. How could I NOT fall in love with that? We seldom lost and we watched some of the most exciting sporting events in history. :thumbup:

Joseph
06-30-2011, 06:18 PM
I could probably come up with some good reasons stemming from memories and everything but the easiest summary could be made with two simple words.....

my dad.

Red in Chicago
06-30-2011, 06:42 PM
I could probably come up with some good reasons stemming from memories and everything but the easiest summary could be made with two simple words.....

my dad.

me too joseph...even though he is a cubs fan

GADawg
06-30-2011, 07:50 PM
http://gabezimmer.com/polysemantics/fullSize/Brown_Nose_WEB.jpg

nice!

redsmetz
07-07-2011, 05:36 AM
I haven't put in my why, but I came across this poem this week that perhaps says it better than I could. The closing line, frankly, names the enigma of this attachment - even the greatest in this game, failed often.

Baseball

by John Updike

It looks easy from a distance,
easy and lazy, even,
until you stand up to the plate
and see the fastball sailing inside,
an inch from your chin,
or circle in the outfield
straining to get a bead
on a small black dot
a city block or more high,
a dark star that could fall
on your head like a leaden meteor.

The grass, the dirt, the deadly hops
between your feet and overeager glove:
football can be learned,
and basketball finessed, but
there is no hiding from baseball
the fact that some are chosen
and some are not—those whose mitts
feel too left-handed,
who are scared at third base
of the pulled line drive,
and at first base are scared
of the shortstop's wild throw
that stretches you out like a gutted deer.

There is nowhere to hide when the ball's
spotlight swivels your way,
and the chatter around you falls still,
and the mothers on the sidelines,
your own among them, hold their breaths,
and you whiff on a terrible pitch
or in the infield achieve
something with the ball so
ridiculous you blush for years.
It's easy to do. Baseball was
invented in America, where beneath
the good cheer and sly jazz the chance
of failure is everybody's right,
beginning with baseball.

"Baseball" by John Updike, from Endpoint and Other Poems. Alfred A. Knopf, 2009.

CySeymour
07-07-2011, 10:20 AM
I don't remember the exact moment I started loving the game. But it has been the one constant in everyday of my life. Not a day goes by where I don't think about it...about the Reds...about playing or coaching the sport.

Beginning with Little League and up through high school. I played for the love of the game. I was never the best player, but in my mind I could walk out on the field and be Bench...or Rose...or Schmidt...or Aaron.

How many nights did my mom wake me up at 3am after I had fallen asleep in the middle of my floor with headsets on listening to the Reds playing on the coast? I felt every loss and every win.

Joe Nuxhall was more then just a baseball announcer. He was a friend. That uncle who you just couldn't get enough of. To me, he was the Reds. To date, he is the only celebrity who I shed a tear for when he passed.

But more then anything, baseball to me is playing catch with dad out in the yard on a warm summer night.

Thanks, Dad.

Redlegs
07-07-2011, 11:06 AM
I love it because it was the first sport I followed growing up in Norwood in the 70's. I love it because of the memories I have as a kid playing in the summer with my parents and the widow next door sitting out on their porches listening to Marty & Joe. I love it because of my late grandmother taking me via metro bus downtown to the 580 Giftshop and on to Riverfront to see the Big Red Machine. I love it because it's a hundred and sixty two game marathon where the cream will always, always rise to the top. I love it because Cincinnati is my town and the Reds are my team. It's a game of skill and strategy. It's a game where a guy don't have to look like he's cut from stone to play, as long as he's got some giddy up on his fastball or can turn on one at the plate. I love it because it's the best game on the planet.

(Sorry for the rambling. Just started typing and let it go, unedited.)

RANDY IN INDY
07-07-2011, 11:14 AM
I didn't particularly care for Bart Giamatti, but this quote is very good:


[Baseball] breaks your heart. It is designed to break your heart. The game begins in the spring, when everything else begins again, and it blossoms in the summer, filling the afternoons and evenings, and then as soon as the chill rains come, it stops and leaves you to face the fall all alone. You count on it, rely on it to buffer the passage of time, to keep the memory of sunshine and high skies alive, and then just when the days are all twilight, when you need it most, it stops."
— A. Bartlett Giamatti (Take Time for Paradise: Americans and Their Games

Roy Tucker
07-07-2011, 12:23 PM
One of the things I like about baseball and beong a Reds fan is that it is a constant companion from April to November. Other sports are big events but baseball is a constant roll of games from early spring through the heat of summer to the chill of fall. Its integrated into every-day life. Almost every day, it's watching the game on TV, catching bits and pieces on the radio, reading the game stories, and now in the modern era, visiting with all the yahoos here in RedsZone. And each and every one of those games is a fascinating source of stories from the macro of how the season is going to the micro of living and dying with individual pitches. Following the arc of the big stars and the little stories of short callups. Talking and comparing ballplayers from today's teams and reaching back into the history and teams and players I've known about and back even further into what I've read about. Being able to geek out on esoteric numbers or just enjoying the evening in the stadium and watching a game unfold. Talking about the Reds is a conversation I can have with a 8 yr. old neighborhood kid, my 75 yr. old mother-in-law, some guy in the elevator, the priest at our church, the guys over beers, small-talk chit-chat around a business conference table, or my 17 yr. old niece. I'm often struck by some of the unlikely places you find a Reds fan and the passion we all have for them and the game of baseball.

reds44
07-07-2011, 12:41 PM
I wish I knew.

mattfeet
07-07-2011, 01:38 PM
This thread needs to be stickied or saved. A lot of outstanding and heart-felt replies. Hands down my favorite RZ post to date.

-Matt