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RedsManRick
07-11-2011, 06:09 PM
Simple question -- I'm curious how things balance out these days. Were you alive & a Reds fan during the BRM era?

corkedbat
07-11-2011, 06:13 PM
Simple question -- I'm curious how things balance out these days. Were you a Reds fan during the BRM era?

Yep. 75 & 76 were my Junior and Senior years of High School. 69-76 was an amazing time to be a Reds fan.

lollipopcurve
07-11-2011, 06:19 PM
what corkedbat said

redsmetz
07-11-2011, 06:20 PM
I was 20 and 21 for the two back to back years. I won a case of Carling Black Label from a Yankee fan who worked in the Baltimore terminal of the trucking company I worked for in 1976. Hey, Mabel...

Brutus
07-11-2011, 06:21 PM
I was not born. In fact, my parents were still in high school and had not met yet.

corkedbat
07-11-2011, 06:22 PM
69-76 was an amazing time to be a Reds fan. They could be down 6 runs or more in the fifth inning and you still felt like it was just a matter of time until they came. Often as not they did. Mainly because it often didn't occur to them they might lose. An extremely confident bunch (understatement). I count my self blessed to have witnessed it.

They went on one stretch here they were like 59-6 (can't remember the exact numbers) that was as amazing as anything I've witnessed in sports. Truly a Machine.

corkedbat
07-11-2011, 06:24 PM
I was not born. In fact, my parents were still in high school and had not met yet.

Damn, I'm old! :D

Brutus
07-11-2011, 06:30 PM
Damn, I'm old! :D

It's OK. I'm realizing very quickly that it's a realization that comes on all of us sooner rather than later lol

dabvu2498
07-11-2011, 06:45 PM
I was born during Game 2 (literally during the game) of the 1975 NLCS.

chicoruiz
07-11-2011, 06:56 PM
Shoot, I remember the '61 Reds...

The Machine was amazing to watch...what I remember is they seemed like they ALWAYS got the runner from first to third, they ALWAYS took the extra base, and they ALWAYS beat up on bad starting pitching. Maybe memory is selective, but I never remember some kid coming up from AAA and baffling them; that's a phenomenon that more recent editions of the Reds have introduced me to.

Always Red
07-11-2011, 07:05 PM
Yep, I was 8 in 1969, and first became aware in a real way, and was 19 in 1980, when they won the last divisional title with John Mac at the helm.

It was the best of times, the best time EVER to be a Reds fan, and for many years afterward, I was spoiled and expected far too much of my Redlegs.

Always Red
07-11-2011, 07:08 PM
The Machine was amazing to watch...what I remember is they seemed like they ALWAYS got the runner from first to third, they ALWAYS took the extra base, and they ALWAYS beat up on bad starting pitching. Maybe memory is selective, but I never remember some kid coming up from AAA and baffling them; that's a phenomenon that more recent editions of the Reds have introduced me to.

I agree- they were the consummate professional ballplayers. They prepared to win, and they expected to win. And after they got over the hump in 1975, their confidence levels were sky high.

Always Red
07-11-2011, 07:09 PM
Randy Jones had their number though, without looking, IIRC.

Roy Tucker
07-11-2011, 07:10 PM
I leaned back in my chair here and thought back to those days...

For the '70 WS, I was a snot-nosed freshman at Ohio U. Watched it on the Sargent Hall TV in the lobby. In those days, the dorms had one (1) TV set for the whole dorm that we watched (Star Trek was big and the first Monday Night Football game was then and Homer Jones went nuts). That was the series that Brooks Robinson put on a show. Since the Reds being in the WS was a new thing, I was just glad they made it.

In 1972, I had transferred up to Ohio State for my junior year and living in an apartment at 9th and Indianola. Watched Gene Tenace and Joe Rudi blow up the Reds. I was p-o'ed because I swore the Reds were better and expected them to win.

1975, I was a college graduate, recently married to future ex-Mrs. Tucker, and trying to get used to the world outside of college. Game 6 forever sticks in my mind. We were at some friends' apartment, ate a lot of Mexican, and drank a boatload of tequila. Our hostess was puking when Carbo hit his homer. That really was an epic series.

In 1976, the future ex-Mrs. Tucker was well on her way to earning the ex- title and I got drunk a lot. The Reds blew through the season, blew through the Phillies in the NLCS, blew through the Yankees in the WS, and I thought the BRM would go on forever (just like my marriage). Little did I realize that both of them were already over.

One comment I'll make is that with 20-20 hindsight, the BRM was a juggernaut. But living through those times, it all wasn't as certain as it looks now. There were a lot of ups and downs and thrill of victories and blah blah. RZ would have had a field day then.

RedsManRick
07-11-2011, 07:12 PM
I was not born. In fact, my parents were still in high school and had not met yet.

Mine too -- they met senior year of high school in 1975.

MrCinatit
07-11-2011, 07:26 PM
I was 8 when they won their first one, and was just starting to appreciate the game, as it was in my young age.

Raisor
07-11-2011, 07:28 PM
Born in 73, have flashes of memory of the good years.

Unassisted
07-11-2011, 07:37 PM
I was 11 when they won it all in '75. I really waffled on whether I was too young to appreciate it. My fond memories center on going to a game in '74 with my grandfather who died the following May and didn't get to see them win it all the next 2 years. I have vivid memories of my dad listening to games on the radio during '75 and '76. I was not deeply invested enough to join him for much listening at that point and televised games were few and far between.

My senior year of high school happened during the dreadful season of '82. I saw the best of times and some of the worst of times for Reds baseball between 5th grade and graduation. I listened to a lot of games on the radio that summer, since I had a job where I worked evenings by myself. Marty was not nearly so critical in those days, but he certainly could have been.

GADawg
07-11-2011, 07:43 PM
i can really remember '75 and '76 but the earlier '70's is out for me except for baseball cards and such that I collected in mid decade. I lived and died with what Johnny Bench did day to day(I did alot of living eh?) and didn't have near enough respect at the time for the contributions of Rose and Morgan. Kids dig the long ball to ya know...it's not just for chicks.

Eric_the_Red
07-11-2011, 07:52 PM
Just missed it by a few years. Born in '78, so I grew up in the days of the 1980's teams. :eek:

Joseph
07-11-2011, 07:59 PM
Born in 1974 so I have no recollection of the BRM in reality. I became a baseball fan when Pete returned in 1984 and heard my dad and uncle very excited about the prospect of it. I fell in love with that skinny CF kid they had, Eric Davis, and from there I was hooked.

KittyDuran
07-11-2011, 08:22 PM
what corkedbat said
Same here... But add one year: 1975 I was a sophomore, 1976 a junior.

George Anderson
07-11-2011, 08:23 PM
I was 7 years old in 1975 and I vividly remember Cesar Geronimo catching the final out and seeing all the players celebrating thinking this is the coolest thing ever. My really didn't follow baseball to terribly close till that moment but I was hooked from there on out.

The sad thing is no team since could ever match what those great teams were. From age 7 and 8 it has all been down hill for me.

traderumor
07-11-2011, 08:27 PM
My first season of following closely was 1973 at age 8, remember hearing the Hal King homerun on the radio standing in the front room.

A double-edged sword is learning the game from the BRM. While they played beautiful baseball, it also raised expectations to a level that you want to see the team rise to that level again, knowing that it cannot happen for the Reds ever again without a Ruthian change in the economics of the game.

traderumor
07-11-2011, 08:29 PM
Born in 1974 so I have no recollection of the BRM in reality. I became a baseball fan when Pete returned in 1984 and heard my dad and uncle very excited about the prospect of it. I fell in love with that skinny CF kid they had, Eric Davis, and from there I was hooked.
I remember that day too. I was in my late teens, so I had become preoccupied with other things during the dark years of 1982-83, even to the point of enjoying the Cubs pennant run in 1984.

All of a sudden, with that one bold move, the Reds became relevant again.

marcshoe
07-11-2011, 09:17 PM
'72 was the first year I followed the Reds closely. And yes, they were better than the A's (grumble grumble).

nate
07-11-2011, 09:36 PM
The BRM is the main reason I'm a Reds fan today (born in 1968!)

RedRoser
07-11-2011, 10:14 PM
A Sweet 16 Sophomore in '75 and a seventeen year old high school Junior in 1976. Listened to almost every game on my transistor radio or in my '76 Pontiac Trans-Am! Hardly ever got to watch them on TV unless they were on the Saturday game of the week, but my Dad had relatives in the Cincy area---Sharon Woods and Norwood---so we visited Riverfront Stadium every now and then.
Man I miss those days, my Dad, and the Big Red Machine! Baseball was such a big part of our lives! :D

---'Roser

mbgrayson
07-11-2011, 11:01 PM
I was born in 1959, and I remember it all quite fondly.

I was a fan when I was playing little league, and I got to start going to games in 1970 right after they moved to Riverfront from Crosley. I closely followed the Reds, listening to them on the radio mostly, since few games were on TV back then. From 1972 through 1978, when I graduated High School, I went to about 3 or 4 games a year, and I dare say I saw just about every televised game, be it the game of the week, or playoffs, or World Series.

Pete was my hero back then, and I just loved how he hustled. Didn't see anything corny about it. I remember being crushed when they lost Game 6 in 1975, and elated the next day when they pulled out a win in game seven. I even remember how upset I was when they lost to the Orioles in 1970, and the A's in 1972.

I still have pennants from three of those years, including '75 and '76, hanging up in my home office.

SunDeck
07-11-2011, 11:16 PM
I was all about the BRM. Posters all over my room, I wrote a get well card to Concepcion when he broke his ankle, I met Pete Rose, and like a lot of kids I ran out walks.

TStuck
07-11-2011, 11:18 PM
I was born in '68. Went to my first Reds game in '74 and was in absolute heaven in '75 &'76 when "my" team was on top of the world. Johnny Bench resided on the same level with God in my mind. Played hundreds of whiffle ball games where I'd imitate the batting stances of the various Reds players. Man, it was an awesome time to be a kid in the tri-state area.

Degenerate39
07-11-2011, 11:37 PM
Born in 1990 so I've never seen the Reds when the World Series :/

VR
07-11-2011, 11:44 PM
I'm not a Cincy guy....but as a 10 year old in '75.....they were on TV all the time, they became my baseball drug. Can't shake it.....I still remember how I felt when George Foster would come to the plate with that black bat and sweet side burns. Batting gloves? pffffffffffft.

RANDY IN INDY
07-12-2011, 12:27 AM
Went to my first Reds game in '69 at Crosley Field. I was 8. The Big Red Machine was just starting to get on track. Matter of fact, my favorite Reds team ever was the 1970 team, even though they lost to Brooks and the Orioles in the World Series. Great memories of all those years through 1976. It was a great time to be a kid who loved baseball and the Reds.

WVRedsFan
07-12-2011, 12:35 AM
I was 26 when the 75 Reds beat the Red Sox. Like others, I remember the 61 NL Champ Reds (age 12). I'm an old timer. I think the '11 Reds are ery similar to the 1962 team that followed the 61 pennant. The 61 team lost the WS 4 games to 1, but there was hope for 62. They underachieved and fell three games short. They they didn't win another pennant forever. Or at least it seemed that way. The 70's brought back the sizzle, though.

Tony Cloninger
07-12-2011, 12:45 AM
I remember seeing them a lot on MNB the 1st year it was on ABC. Games at HOU and SD. Watching Merv Rettenmund bat for the Padres. Knowing that he was a Red beacuse of his card....I did not know why he had been traded just so Joel Youngblood could make the team in 1976.

I also recall a lot of MNF with the Bengals and how good they were.

The thing is that 1977-78 stick out more for me beacuse of how they could NOT beat the Dodgers.

They were on TV a lot more but you did not realize it was the end. I saw them get pasted by the Phillies at the Vet 12-2 on MNB....as Rose triples leading off and then is caught off base with a come backer to Jim Kaat.
Al Hrabosky striking out Morgan, Bench and Foster and the Reds blowing another game ...8-7.

Trading players left and right and then bringing up 40 year old Joe Hoerner?? You think that would not have started a 10 page thread if they had the net back then...as it was mainly a favor so Joe could get pension time by Bob Howsman.

Watching Tom Hume being unable to get out of the 1st inning in his 1st start.

1978 was even more frustrating. They got out to a fast start but Morgan and Geronimo were basically done as hitters and the bullpen was a blowtorch.
Borbon and Tomlin were 17-3 with ERA's over 5.00.

Sparky basically rode Manny Sarmiento like he was Mike Marshall in the 1st half. Defense was bad. It was sad to watch and yet Sparky managed them to 92-69 despite the fact they should have barely won 85. They were like 30-19 in 1 run games.

I just remember always thinking....Why can't this team develop any starting pitching?

membengal
07-12-2011, 12:48 AM
Born in 1970. Vague memories of 1976, much clearer memories of '77-'79. Huge George Foster fan.

WVRedsFan
07-12-2011, 01:05 AM
I really have fond memories of 75-76. My Dad retired in 73 and immediately had a massive heart attack. He survived and lived to see those championship years. We watched every game of those World Series. We had lived the 61 season with every evening sitting by the radio and listening to Waite Hoyt. That ended in disappointment. Then came 1962 and more disappointment. The next year was worse and we really blew it in 1964, going into the last weekend in 1st place. I hated Brooks Robinson for being a apart of losing the series in 1970 and so did Dad. But then came 1975 and that awesome series against the Red Sox and beating the Yankees in 1976 ("I now know why they call them 'Damn Yankees," my father said in 61) just thrilled him. It was 14 years before the Reds saw the World Series again and he wasn't around to see it.

It's been 21 years since then, but the the BRM will always be the highlight of my sports life. Living in the past is not so great, but maybe someday before I die, my son and I can have memories like that.

mth123
07-12-2011, 01:39 AM
Been a huge fan since the 60s. I don't think that us Reds fans from back then really knew how good we had it until we didn't have it anymore. 1982 was a sobering experience.

Blitz Dorsey
07-12-2011, 01:43 AM
Born in April of '76, so I fall (barely) into the middle category. I was alive during the Machine era, but far too young to appreciate it. But man did I get brainwashed as a Reds fan at a young age. I was diehard by the '82 season at the age of 6. I was too young to even understand how much it sucked that I had just missed out on seeing one of the greatest baseball teams ever. (If not THE greatest.) But at least I had my dad to fill me in.

Big Klu
07-12-2011, 03:12 AM
I was 5 & 6 for the back-to-back World Championships. I vaguely recall hearing one of the World Series games on the car radio as we were leaving my grandmother's house, but I couldn't tell you which game (or even which year).

The first game I can actually remember watching on TV was the game in 1978 against the Braves when Pete Rose had his hitting streak snapped. I have vague memories of a couple of other games in '78--one against the Astros in the Astrodome (I remember Jose Cruz batting), and a Saturday afternoon game on NBC that Paul Moskau started and hit a home run, but I don't know if they were before or after the Atlanta game. I also have vague memories of listening to games on the radio in the late 70's, and being very surprised when I finally saw what Marty and Joe actually looked like. I had imagined Marty as looking like Carroll O'Connor, and Joe as James Stewart.

The first year I really started following the Reds closely was 1980. So while I am very knowledgeable about the BRM (because I've studied them), and they were my baseball heroes as a young child--even though they were past their prime and may have moved on to other clubs, the team I'm most emotionally attached to is the 1990 team. (They are "my" team.)

vic715
07-12-2011, 04:56 AM
Born in the early 50's I remember the 61 team very well too.Frank Robinson was my favorite player and even today I still say he's the best all round player to wear a Reds uniform.The BRM was so good that I never exepted them ever losing a game.I cussed Sparky every night the entire time he managed them.Funny because I screamed the loudest when they fired him.Bob Howsam said right after they won the WS in game four that this will be the last great team.He was right because the reserve clause was no more.

Ron Madden
07-12-2011, 05:40 AM
I can vaguely remember watching the Reds and Yankees in the 1961 World Series. Attended my first game at Crosley Field in 1963, saw the Reds beat Sandy Koufax and the Dodgers 1-0. Yea, I remember the Big Red Machine... Fond memories they are.

cumberlandreds
07-12-2011, 08:49 AM
As you can read my signature line I have been a fan since 1971. That was actually the poorest season of the BRM era. My dad turned on the radio for me to listen and I have been turned onto them since. I guess I didn't really appreciate how good they were until the era was over. I'm sure because they were so good that it cemented by love of the game forever. It was such a good era. You never felt like they were out of a game. I was 12 and 13 when they won it all. Those were some of the best days of my life listening and watching the Reds. I listened every night. TV games were rare back then. One of best things was listening to those late night west coast games and drifting off to sleep while listening to Marty and Joe. There will never be another BRM. I'm glad I was alive and able to see them.

RedsBaron
07-12-2011, 08:52 AM
I was born in 1955, attended my first game at Crosley Field in 1965, and became a Reds fan in 1966, so I got to experience the BRM from its very beginnings. Rose was the only member of the BRM who was already an established fixture in the Reds lineup in '66.
I saw Perez become a starter (and All Star game MVP) in 1967, the same year teenager Gary Nolan had his terrific rookie season and Johnny Bench made his late season debut.
1968 was the rookie of the year campaign by Bench, Lee May became a regular, and Clay Carroll was acquired. The Reds became the best hitting team in baseball, a title they retained in '69 with games such as a 19-17 win over the Phillies and rallying from 9 runs down to win 10-9, while adding Bobby Tolan.
1970 brought a World Series appearance and Concepcion, Gullett, Carbo, and, of course, Sparky.
After the disappointment of 1971, I thrilled to the 1972 NLCS, with Bench's dramatic game tying HR in game five and Foster scoring on a wild pitch to win it, and I had the bitter disappointment of the Reds losing the World Series to the A's.
1973 brought more thrills, as Hal King's HR set off a dramatic rally as the Reds came from more than 10 games back to win the NL West from the Dodgers, and more disappointment, as the Reds lost the NLCS to the Mets and their hoodlum fans.
1974 brought a second place finish. All the while the Reds kept adding pieces, Foster in '71, Morgan, Geronimo and Billingham in '72, Griffey in '73, but it wasn't enough. Great as they were, the BRM had no world titles.....
Until 1975.
I have vivid memories of 1975, especially of the GREATEST WORLD SERIES EVER PLAYED. I flunked a mid-term the day after game seven and I have never regreted my decision to watch baseball instead of studying on that night.
1976 brought another World Championship, but it was more melancholy to me, as I had a hint that it would soon be at an end. It was, but the memories linger. When the BRM reunited (sans Rose) at Riverfront in 2000 I was there, and tears came to my eyes as I saw my heroes come together one final time.

cumberlandreds
07-12-2011, 08:53 AM
Shoot, I remember the '61 Reds...

The Machine was amazing to watch...what I remember is they seemed like they ALWAYS got the runner from first to third, they ALWAYS took the extra base, and they ALWAYS beat up on bad starting pitching. Maybe memory is selective, but I never remember some kid coming up from AAA and baffling them; that's a phenomenon that more recent editions of the Reds have introduced me to.

John Candelaria was one young pitcher that did. He nearly shut down the Reds in game three of the 1975 NLCS. I think he had some other good games against them too.
Someone mentioned Randy Jones. He totally baffled the BRM. He threw slow,slower and slowest. They rarely figured him out.

_Sir_Charles_
07-12-2011, 09:11 AM
Shoot, I remember the '61 Reds...

The Machine was amazing to watch...what I remember is they seemed like they ALWAYS got the runner from first to third, they ALWAYS took the extra base, and they ALWAYS beat up on bad starting pitching. Maybe memory is selective, but I never remember some kid coming up from AAA and baffling them; that's a phenomenon that more recent editions of the Reds have introduced me to.

Your memory is not faulty. That's how I recall them too. I always thought that the BRM's pitching was pretty poor but that the offense would win no matter HOW many runs they allowed. Looking back, the staff wasn't anywhere close to poor. We just didn't really have that standout guy (although Gullet was close looking back).

Always Red
07-12-2011, 10:19 AM
Your memory is not faulty. That's how I recall them too. I always thought that the BRM's pitching was pretty poor but that the offense would win no matter HOW many runs they allowed. Looking back, the staff wasn't anywhere close to poor. We just didn't really have that standout guy (although Gullet was close looking back).

I think that brings up a great point that many don't realize about the BRM days. Sure, they had great hitting, but many Reds teams have through the years, and did not achieve what these guys did.

The secret? They finally had really good pitching. Team ERA is certainly not the best parameter, but it's quick and dirty and easily findable. Here are the years, 1969-1980, with the Reds rank in team ERA in the NL. Compare their standing in team ERA, and what kind of year the team wound up having:

1969- 9th (out of 12)
1970- 2nd
1971- 7th
1972- 3rd
1973- 4th
1974- 3rd
1975- 3rd
1976- 5th
1977- 10th
1978- 9th
1979- 4th
1980- 10th

Blimpie
07-12-2011, 10:29 AM
I was just a T-baller when the BRM went on their run during the 1975 season. I remember our entire team making the trip up to Cincinnati one night to watch them play a game against the Braves.

One night at Riverfront for a seven year old was all it took to solidify me as a lifelong fan.

cumberlandreds
07-12-2011, 10:41 AM
I think that brings up a great point that many don't realize about the BRM days. Sure, they had great hitting, but many Reds teams have through the years, and did not achieve what these guys did.

The secret? They finally had really good pitching. Team ERA is certainly not the best parameter, but it's quick and dirty and easily findable. Here are the years, 1969-1980, with the Reds rank in team ERA in the NL. Compare their standing in team ERA, and what kind of year the team wound up having:

1969- 9th (out of 12)
1970- 2nd
1971- 7th
1972- 3rd
1973- 4th
1974- 3rd
1975- 3rd
1976- 5th
1977- 10th
1978- 9th
1979- 4th
1980- 10th

The BRM had a great bullpen. McEanany,Eastwick,Borbon and Carroll were outstanding. The rotation consistently gave 7 good innings too and then turned it over the pen. That was way ahead of the times. Like Charles said they just didn't have that big stud at the top of the rotation. Gullett could have been that if not for injuries. He would have easily won 20 games in 1975 if not for a broken thumb in the middle of the season.
Norman,Nolan and Billingham were better than average starters. In 1976 Zachary and Alcala gave the rotation a huge shot in the arm by having really good season that year too. Yes the pitching was underrated. But what staff wouldn't be with a lineup like that.

RichRed
07-12-2011, 10:54 AM
I was born in '69, and my earliest memories of Reds fandom are around '77-'78, so just after the glory years (dammit).

I became a Reds fan entirely on my own, and I'm still not sure how it happened. Growing up in Virginia, none of my friends were Reds fans. My dad's favorite player growing up was Ted Williams, but he didn't really follow a particular team. I suspect though that it was from watching them on the Saturday Game of the Week. Like others mentioned, I became enthralled with George Foster, that black bat, and those awesome 'burns. The power he could generate as a 180-190 pound guy was incredible.

At the time, I'm sure I didn't understand that I had just missed out on a couple of the best years any team ever had, but I was hooked for life nonetheless. Praying for a Reds player - ANY Red - to show up in a pack of baseball cards, listening to Marty and Joe every summer night (yes, we could usually pick up the signal all the way in Va. Beach), imitating batting stances, etc., etc., etc.

reds1869
07-12-2011, 11:49 AM
My parents were married in '74 and I didn't come along until several years later. So I missed the BRM Era.

Redsfan320
07-12-2011, 12:21 PM
I wasn't born yet. My parents were still under 13.

320

Crosley68
07-12-2011, 12:36 PM
I started listening to games with my father in the mid-60's. I remember the 65 World Series on TV as my oldest pro baseball memory. I use to think that my first trip to Crosley was in 68 (hence my name) but now have evidence that I went in 67 for the first time. So there were many players from the pre BRM team that were my favorites first like Pinson, Cardenas, Maloney, and Abernathy alone with some of the guys that stayed around a bit later like Pete, Tommy, Lee, Tony and a young guy name Johnny that my dad and I thought just might turn out to be pretty good.

remdog
07-14-2011, 11:37 AM
I've read through this thread and one thing that I've discovered is that, in terms of following baseball in general and the Reds in particular, everyone that has posted a comment here is a 'newbie', relative to me. :laugh:

Rem

Strikes Out Looking
07-14-2011, 11:51 AM
I was a kid -- born in '64 -- during the Machine era. I lived and died every day with the Reds, fortunately, there was lots more living than dying.

AmarilloRed
07-14-2011, 11:58 AM
I was born in 1969-young enough to attend some Reds games in 1975.

The Voice of IH
07-14-2011, 04:31 PM
I was not born. In fact, my parents were still in high school and had not met yet.

That is nothing, my dad was in elementary school at the time, and my mom was probably in primary school :laugh:

max venable
07-17-2011, 06:37 PM
I still have two sets of four near-mint condition World Series ticket stubs. One set from the '75 series and one from '76.

I didn't go. My dad did. I was about 7 years old but smart enough to keep the stubs! :)