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wvreds
07-18-2011, 11:13 PM
Guys, what are we going to do with this offense.... I mean is there anything we can do?

webbbj
07-18-2011, 11:28 PM
http://espn.go.com/mlb/stats/team/_/stat/batting/league/nl/sort/runs/order/true

mroby85
07-18-2011, 11:31 PM
http://espn.go.com/mlb/stats/team/_/stat/batting/league/nl/sort/runs/order/true

Obviously a stat geek that doesn't watch them play.
I would start Heisey for an extended period and see what happened. Possibly look at bringingup Mesoraco or Yonder, or trading for help from the outside. Honestly, without making a move from the outside, I don't know if it can be improved that much.

Jefferson24
07-18-2011, 11:31 PM
http://espn.go.com/mlb/stats/team/_/stat/batting/league/nl/sort/runs/order/true

Overall runs and timely hitting are two very different things. The first is good, the latter is the difference between wins and losses.

Fullboat
07-19-2011, 12:10 AM
I would tinker with the lineup but.....:dunno:

redram
07-19-2011, 12:13 AM
http://espn.go.com/mlb/stats/team/_/stat/batting/league/nl/sort/runs/order/true


When you can show me a stat that has them winning then show it, until then keep your meaningless stats to yourself. ANYONE that thinks this is a good offensive team this year is in dream land. This is one of the worst hitting teams with runners in scoring position I can remember seeing and about the only thing we will lead the league in if it continues is runners LOB and runners LOB in scoring position. When is the last time we have scored against the Pirates. We have scored 3 runs in the past 27 innings against them. Team continue to give us chances like getting 5 outs in an inning and coming up empty. This team stinks, period, and until they stop swinging for the fences on every at bat it will not get better. Phillips has never been good in the cleanup spot yet Dusty has him there again. I have never been this frustrated watching a Reds team play as this year. Even when we were Bad it was not like this. This team has way to much talent to be playing this way and that comes down to managing and coaching. Now lets all make sure we read Brandon's tweets later, maybe he can explain all the strike outs , esp the one in the first inning that if he hits the ball could have changed this entire game. If he had as many hits as he does tweets he would be a sure Hall of Fame first year entry.

Krawhitham
07-19-2011, 12:13 AM
Obviously a stat geek that doesn't watch them play.
I would start Heisey for an extended period and see what happened. Possibly look at bringingup Mesoraco or Yonder, or trading for help from the outside. Honestly, without making a move from the outside, I don't know if it can be improved that much.


I'm sure this is just another geek stat but the Reds have the 3rd best OPS for catchers in the league

What is the point of bring Yonder up if you are going to play Heisey everyday, so he can sit on the bench and screw up his progression?

Fullboat
07-19-2011, 12:15 AM
I would tinker with lineup but.....:dunno:

texasdave
07-19-2011, 12:23 AM
They are not going to bring up Alonso. He would probably just get on base at a good clip and clog up the bases. That's no way to play the game.

Vottomatic
07-19-2011, 07:46 AM
I would change up the lineup but.......:mooner:

LegallyMinded
07-19-2011, 08:50 AM
Overall runs and timely hitting are two very different things. The first is good, the latter is the difference between wins and losses.

That may be true, but the problem is that you can only control overall runs. That is, "timely hitting" isn't a skill you can go out and improve or make an acquisition to bolster.

To see this, just look at a few examples of players who are purportedly "timely" or "clutch" hitters. David Ortiz, for instance, has a reputation for game-deciding hits, but look at his average with RISP over the last few years: .354, .290, .362, .336, .238, .298, .217. Or how about Derek Jeter, another allegedly clutch hitter: .261, .386, .354, .317, .259, .271, .185.

These are just some isolated examples, but the point is clear: The ability to get clutch hits varies widely from year to year; it's not a function of some players magically being more consistent or more skilled in high leverage situations. Instead, it's a function of chance.

In short, all a team can do to maximize its offensive potential is go out and get the best players it can. It can't shore up weak "clutch skills" by finding "clutch" players, because the concept of clutch is largely a matter of perception, not reality.

With that in mind, the fact that the Reds are leading the NL in runs scored is a great sign for the future. That says the Reds have done a fine job fielding a good offensive team; for the most part, they've gone out and found productive players. Maybe the runs those players have scored haven't always come in "clutch" situations, but over time, that's going to even out, and the Reds are going to start winning some more games.

redssince75
07-19-2011, 09:41 AM
That may be true, but the problem is that you can only control overall runs. That is, "timely hitting" isn't a skill you can go out and improve or make an acquisition to bolster.

To see this, just look at a few examples of players who are purportedly "timely" or "clutch" hitters. David Ortiz, for instance, has a reputation for game-deciding hits, but look at his average with RISP over the last few years: .354, .290, .362, .336, .238, .298, .217. Or how about Derek Jeter, another allegedly clutch hitter: .261, .386, .354, .317, .259, .271, .185.

These are just some isolated examples, but the point is clear: The ability to get clutch hits varies widely from year to year; it's not a function of some players magically being more consistent or more skilled in high leverage situations. Instead, it's a function of chance.

In short, all a team can do to maximize its offensive potential is go out and get the best players it can. It can't shore up weak "clutch skills" by finding "clutch" players, because the concept of clutch is largely a matter of perception, not reality.

With that in mind, the fact that the Reds are leading the NL in runs scored is a great sign for the future. That says the Reds have done a fine job fielding a good offensive team; for the most part, they've gone out and found productive players. Maybe the runs those players have scored haven't always come in "clutch" situations, but over time, that's going to even out, and the Reds are going to start winning some more games.

Actually, there IS something you can do to address failure to drive in RISP (over and over and over and over and over and over and over again) that has nothing to do with "acquiring players".

You can change your team's approach at the plate. You can stop PH-ing people who are 0-for-the-year as a pinch hitter. You can call for sacrifices or suicide squeezes or hit-and-runs or instruct someone (usually done before the game, not right before the at-bat) not to swing for the fences.

In other words, you can manage and coach players to approach ABs a bit differently in these situations. Is this being done? No evidence of same.

Stray
07-19-2011, 09:51 AM
I would tinker with lineup but.....:dunno:

I was thinking about something like that too. Phillips isn't suited as a cleanup hitter at all. But then, who in the heck on this team is?

It seems we're always finding Bruce or Rolen up in key situations and those are the last two guys I like to see up. Bruce is a strikeout or double play waiting to happen in big moments lately, and when pitchers know they need a K on a Rolen they know how to get it.

The only thing I can think of is that we need to acquire a bat through a trade. Maybe then Cozart could lead off and Phillips could go back to his natural 2 hole. Stubbs has been playing a lot better lately leading off, but I still think he's more valuable down in the order. All of this would do nothing but help Votto out since he has been playing without any protection.

Stray
07-19-2011, 09:59 AM
Actually, there IS something you can do to address failure to drive in RISP (over and over and over and over and over and over and over again) that has nothing to do with "acquiring players".

You can change your team's approach at the plate. You can stop PH-ing people who are 0-for-the-year as a pinch hitter. You can call for sacrifices or suicide squeezes or hit-and-runs or instruct someone (usually done before the game, not right before the at-bat) not to swing for the fences.

In other words, you can manage and coach players to approach ABs a bit differently in these situations. Is this being done? No evidence of same.

We don't have many people you can trust to always get a bunt down on the team. Cairo, Heisey,....? I love the suicide squeeze tho, and it seemed Dusty had the guts to go to it a lot more last season. Even if it failed, I don't think even the Dusty haters on Sun Deck would be too upset that he was at least trying to make something happen.

I also think the players need to be responsible for changing their approach at bat to at bat. I don't really think the 3B coach should have to relay a "hit a flyball" sign. These guys are pros and they should know that, and I'm sure they do. We're just not a team loaded with contact or disciplined hitters.

texasdave
07-19-2011, 10:14 AM
We don't have many people you can trust to always get a bunt down on the team.

A sore point with me. There is absolutely no excuse for a major league hitter to not be able to get down a bunt. None whatsoever. Most games are not slugfests. Imagine that, acquiring the skills necessary to win ballgames. How radical is that?

ervinsm84
07-19-2011, 10:16 AM
That may be true, but the problem is that you can only control overall runs. That is, "timely hitting" isn't a skill you can go out and improve or make an acquisition to bolster.

To see this, just look at a few examples of players who are purportedly "timely" or "clutch" hitters. David Ortiz, for instance, has a reputation for game-deciding hits, but look at his average with RISP over the last few years: .354, .290, .362, .336, .238, .298, .217. Or how about Derek Jeter, another allegedly clutch hitter: .261, .386, .354, .317, .259, .271, .185.

These are just some isolated examples, but the point is clear: The ability to get clutch hits varies widely from year to year; it's not a function of some players magically being more consistent or more skilled in high leverage situations. Instead, it's a function of chance.

In short, all a team can do to maximize its offensive potential is go out and get the best players it can. It can't shore up weak "clutch skills" by finding "clutch" players, because the concept of clutch is largely a matter of perception, not reality.

With that in mind, the fact that the Reds are leading the NL in runs scored is a great sign for the future. That says the Reds have done a fine job fielding a good offensive team; for the most part, they've gone out and found productive players. Maybe the runs those players have scored haven't always come in "clutch" situations, but over time, that's going to even out, and the Reds are going to start winning some more games.

A+ post, but youll just be wasting ur time talking about this with guys who think the off is the problem. theres no point in bothering discussing this with the people who disagree despite every piece of evidence that counters said belief, bc they ''know'' it to be true.

its almost like trying to reason with someone about religion. That person has their beliefs and will not change.

Stray
07-19-2011, 10:19 AM
A sore point with me. There is absolutely no excuse for a major league hitter to not be able to get down a bunt. None whatsoever. Most games are not slugfests. Imagine that, acquiring the skills necessary to win ballgames. How radical is that?

No argument here. It is a lost skill in baseball these days...

bounty37h
07-19-2011, 10:36 AM
Guys, what are we going to do with this offense.... I mean is there anything we can do?

I thought our offense was grossly overrated last year, we just won those games being the difference IMO. We still get 18 hits and 9 runs one game, then shut out the next and 4 hits 1 run the next...

tobttr
07-19-2011, 11:10 AM
Now I know that the game has changed a lot over the years, but I go back to the 60s, when very few people struck out 100 times. Stubbs had 111 Ks before he hit 400AB this year. It's not just him, but it seems this team strikes out way too much, especially when a nice little groundout to SS would score a run.
Does anybody have stats available on how often this team strikes out in comparison to other contending teams?

redssince75
07-19-2011, 01:24 PM
A+ post, but youll just be wasting ur time talking about this with guys who think the off is the problem. theres no point in bothering discussing this with the people who disagree despite every piece of evidence that counters said belief, bc they ''know'' it to be true.

its almost like trying to reason with someone about religion. That person has their beliefs and will not change.

Tell me about it.

mroby85
07-19-2011, 01:46 PM
I'm sure this is just another geek stat but the Reds have the 3rd best OPS for catchers in the league

What is the point of bring Yonder up if you are going to play Heisey everyday, so he can sit on the bench and screw up his progression?

If I brought Yonder up I would give Heisey the extended look in CF over Stubbs. I was also throwing that out as an option if you can't get help outside the organization. Also, If Mesoraco is a stud like everyone is saying he is, he should be an upgrade over Hernandez/Hanigan. The Giants did a similar thing last year trading a decent catcher and bringing up Buster Posey, it worked out pretty well for them. I wasn't proposing bringing Yonder up and putting him on the bench.