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GoReds33
08-01-2011, 01:32 AM
Well I've recently decided to try my hand at golf. So far, I've broken three clubs, a driver, and both of my woods. They were very old clubs, and I'm sure my inexperience contributed as well. However, this has left me in a pickle. I'm not quite ready to dedicate any large amount of money to the sport. I purchased a driver off of Amazon, for around thirty dollars. It had a lot of great reviews as being a great value buy. However, I already would like to step up my game to a better driver.

Golf for me is as much about competition as it is the actual joy of the game. My friends and I are always looking to out-drive eachother, and I'm sure that a new club would put me over the top. Is there anywhere I would be able to find a good driver at a reasonable price? I'm going to be paying for college shortly, so 80-100 dollars would even be a reach. But I'm willing to look.

Redhook
08-01-2011, 06:26 AM
How far do you hit your 7 iron?
How far do you "think" you hit a driver?
Do you hit the ball high or low?
If you miss it, does it curve to the left or right most often?

There are plenty of great drivers for a good price on eBay. I can help you out once you answer those questions.

Bumstead
08-01-2011, 03:22 PM
How far do you hit your 7 iron? 160-170 yds
How far do you "think" you hit a driver? I don't hit one right now, 240+
Do you hit the ball high or low? High
If you miss it, does it curve to the left or right most often? Left, left, left

There are plenty of great drivers for a good price on eBay. I can help you out once you answer those questions.

I tend to hook my woods pretty bad so I almost solely use my irons. I'm 43, but I do swing a little hard, so the "noodle-ish" shafts become a problem. I use Ping G10 irons which I love. I'm not the original poster, but I would like to be able to hit with the new equipment...

Jeff

GoReds33
08-01-2011, 05:17 PM
How far do you hit your 7 iron?
How far do you "think" you hit a driver?
Do you hit the ball high or low?
If you miss it, does it curve to the left or right most often?

There are plenty of great drivers for a good price on eBay. I can help you out once you answer those questions.

I've never hit a 7 iron on the range, but I will update when I have.
I had a very old driver, and hit around 200 yards.
I hit low on the ball, so I have a lot of loft. I prefer less loft though.
It usually curves to the right more often.

And I was just given a TaylorMade R7 quad driver.

Redhook
08-02-2011, 07:02 AM
I've never hit a 7 iron on the range, but I will update when I have.
I had a very old driver, and hit around 200 yards.
I hit low on the ball, so I have a lot of loft. I prefer less loft though.
It usually curves to the right more often.

And I was just given a TaylorMade R7 quad driver.

You never hit a 7 iron on the range? Wow. If you want to get better, you should be hitting about 1/2 of your balls with your wedges. A 1/4 or so with the rest of your irons and a 1/4 with woods and hybrids. It makes no sense to hit a lot of drivers on the range. I know it's hard because of the ego factor, but you shouldn't hit more than 10-15....tops. The more you hit, the worse you'll hit them because of fatigue. Think of it this way, how many drivers do you hit during your rounds of golf? 14 right? Try to make practice more realistic and you'll score a lot better....if that's a goal.

Hopefully, that driver will work well for you. Your ball goes high because you're swinging too steep into the ball from the outside. This causes the high slices to the right.

Try this to help that: On your downswing, try to swing more towards 2nd base instead of the SS. While doing this, rotate your right arm over your left sooner.

Redhook
08-02-2011, 07:05 AM
I tend to hook my woods pretty bad so I almost solely use my irons. I'm 43, but I do swing a little hard, so the "noodle-ish" shafts become a problem. I use Ping G10 irons which I love. I'm not the original poster, but I would like to be able to hit with the new equipment...

Jeff

Look for a Taylor Made or Cobra driver that's a year or two old. This will save you a lot of money. eBay is great for buying old clubs. It appears you need a stiffer shaft in your woods if you're hooking them. Try demoing some at a local range with a stiff shaft to see if that calms down the hook.

GoReds33
08-02-2011, 11:26 AM
Well I already broke the R7. This golf thing is getting expensive already. Does anyone have any idea as to why I break so many clubs?

Hoosier Red
08-02-2011, 01:34 PM
Because you're slamming them into a tree after a bad shot? :confused:

If that's the case you should definitely stop doing that.

BuckeyeRed27
08-02-2011, 01:42 PM
Well I already broke the R7. This golf thing is getting expensive already. Does anyone have any idea as to why I break so many clubs?

You're breaking woods and drivers? Are you hitting the ground with the club behind the ball in some way? Where is the club breaking?

Redhook
08-02-2011, 09:13 PM
Well I already broke the R7. This golf thing is getting expensive already. Does anyone have any idea as to why I break so many clubs?

What??!! :confused:

It's pretty obvious you're not doing this in anger which is rare, very rare. What you're doing is coming down extremely steep into the ball. You're chopping straight down on the with no body or limited body turn. You need to make a lot of baseball like swings to round out your swing a bit. You absolutely should not hit the ground with your driver. No ground!! Remember that. If I was you, I'd take a golf lesson asap if you want to have any fun with this game.

GoReds33
08-02-2011, 09:50 PM
Well I went to Golf Galaxy today. They mentioned that I swing too downward as well. The biggest thing they mentioned is that I need to work on hitting the ball on the outside of the club face, as opposed to straight down the shaft. I feel like I take a baseball-like approach and try to hit the ball in line with the shaft. So I will work tomorrow on hitting towards the end of the club face, and staying away from the ground.

In the meantime, I'm also going to pick up some extra long tees, to keep my approach away from the ground.

Buckeye33
08-02-2011, 10:06 PM
Look for a Taylor Made or Cobra driver that's a year or two old. This will save you a lot of money. eBay is great for buying old clubs.

This is very true. I just picked up a '10 Taylormade Burner Superfast for $87.05.

15fan
08-02-2011, 10:14 PM
If I was you, I'd take a golf lesson asap if you want to have any fun with this game.

This.

2 summers ago, I took a couple of lessons for the first time in my life. Prior to the lessons, I hadn't picked up a club in 15 years. As a result, I basically had 0 bad habits to break.

After about 3 lessons, I felt comfortable enough to go out on the range or hit the public links with some confidence that I could adjust my grip/stance/swing when the ball wasn't going down the middle of the fairway.

I ponied up for a new driver, but I'm still using clubs that are older than I am.

(And I'm closing in on my first 39th birthday... :) )

As a complete novice, I'd say sinking a little money into some good instruction is going to do far more for your game in the long run than trying to hit some new clubs with fatally flawed mechanics.

bucksfan2
08-03-2011, 09:06 AM
Well I already broke the R7. This golf thing is getting expensive already. Does anyone have any idea as to why I break so many clubs?

I hate my 9 iron. I have never liked my 9 iron for as long as I have played with my same set of clubs. I actually bought a different 9 iron (of the same set) a few years back and have yet to fix the problem.

Anyway there is one hole at the course I always play that always sets up perfectly for that stupid club. The tees are up and pin is back, the tees are back and pin is up, or tees are middle and pin is middle. No matter what happens I always have to play that stupid club. Anyway I was hitting the ball real well on the back until I came to #14 and my dreaded 9 iron. Of course I miss the green badly with club and slam it down in anger. Well not too self, don't slam a club down on rock hard ground because it will bend the shaft.

So I am with you there with broken/damaged clubs. Its the first one I have damaged since I was playing HS golf. Not exactly a real good feeling if you ask me.

SunDeck
08-03-2011, 09:29 AM
A break through for me was when I started to understand that the golf swing is like a hula hoop. It's always going to be an arc. The more vertical the arc, the "steeper" the swing. That's one of the first things I worked on, learning to flatten that hula hoop arc from vertical to a "plane" that allowed the club to come down at a lower angle.

I try to make it feel as though my spine is a rod, and my shoulders turn on its axis. There are zillions of drills to practice that, and once you get the feel of how your body is supposed to turn in the golf swing, the correct swing arc will follow.

Check out this video, which is actually a drill about keeping the arms and shoulders working in unison, rather than independently. That's a pretty good drill, but watch his body as he demonstrates the swing at around 3:12. You can see how his head remains relatively stationary on the backswing as his shoulders rotate around the spine. It puts him in a good position to start his swing toward the ball.

I think new golfers tend to start their swing with the arms, which is the subject of this video. It's pretty good stuff, from the perspective of someone who also started playing at a late age.

‪Golf Tips tv: Connection Drill will Help You‬‏ - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Kp_Hdoxk3k)

Buckeye33
08-03-2011, 06:40 PM
Like I've mentioned before, I'm very new to golf. I'm getting ready to schedule some lessons but also am in a buying mood. I just bought my own '10 TM Burner Superfast driver, I have tried 3 different drivers before trying this one and I hit it more accurate and at least 25-30 yards farther than anything else I've tried.

My real question is being a newbie, should I be looking to get a graphite shaft or steel shaft in irons? I have an old set of Titelist DCIs that are heavy and hard for me to hit. I'm looking at picking up some Callaway X-20s off eBay but am not sure if I should wait until I get the lessons and get "fitted" for irons.

Thanks

Redhook
08-03-2011, 09:37 PM
Like I've mentioned before, I'm very new to golf. I'm getting ready to schedule some lessons but also am in a buying mood. I just bought my own '10 TM Burner Superfast driver, I have tried 3 different drivers before trying this one and I hit it more accurate and at least 25-30 yards farther than anything else I've tried.

My real question is being a newbie, should I be looking to get a graphite shaft or steel shaft in irons? I have an old set of Titelist DCIs that are heavy and hard for me to hit. I'm looking at picking up some Callaway X-20s off eBay but am not sure if I should wait until I get the lessons and get "fitted" for irons.

Thanks

Don't buy until you take at least 2 lessons. Your pro will help you with your purchase. I'd recommend Jeff Olson at Scioto Reserve. Great guy and a pretty good golfer too. Tell him I sent you to him and he may kick it up a notch for you too. ;)

Homer Bailey
08-04-2011, 11:08 AM
Don't buy until you take at least 2 lessons. Your pro will help you with your purchase. I'd recommend Jeff Olson at Scioto Reserve. Great guy and a pretty good golfer too. Tell him I sent you to him and he may kick it up a notch for you too. ;)

+1.

Jeff gave me the only three lessons I've had in my life, and that was almost ten years ago. He's affordable, and a great guy. I think he's also the pro at Kinsale.

Redhook
08-04-2011, 10:19 PM
+1.

Jeff gave me the only three lessons I've had in my life, and that was almost ten years ago. He's affordable, and a great guy. I think he's also the pro at Kinsale.

This year, he switched to Scioto Reserve as the Head Pro. He was at Kinsale for the past 2 years as the Director of Instruction. That being said, Kinsale and Scioto Reserve are part of the same company so he may still teach a bit at Kinsale.

Homer Bailey
08-05-2011, 01:57 AM
This year, he switched to Scioto Reserve as the Head Pro. He was at Kinsale for the past 2 years as the Director of Instruction. That being said, Kinsale and Scioto Reserve are part of the same company so he may still teach a bit at Kinsale.

Yeah, I meant to imply that he was the pro slash teaches at both courses. My Dad is a member of Scioto Reserve, and he said that Jeff oversees the golf side for both courses. I'll have to mention you're name when I'm back there next month.

bigredmechanism
08-05-2011, 02:31 AM
Well I've recently decided to try my hand at golf. So far, I've broken three clubs, a driver, and both of my woods. They were very old clubs, and I'm sure my inexperience contributed as well. However, this has left me in a pickle. I'm not quite ready to dedicate any large amount of money to the sport. I purchased a driver off of Amazon, for around thirty dollars. It had a lot of great reviews as being a great value buy. However, I already would like to step up my game to a better driver.

Golf for me is as much about competition as it is the actual joy of the game. My friends and I are always looking to out-drive eachother, and I'm sure that a new club would put me over the top. Is there anywhere I would be able to find a good driver at a reasonable price? I'm going to be paying for college shortly, so 80-100 dollars would even be a reach. But I'm willing to look.

Drive for show; putt for dough. (That's what they say, at least)

I was born lucky: 6 foot 6 with long arms. I drive ~280-300 consistently. It doesn't help me as much as I would have expected it to. Honestly, you'll be better off by practicing wedges and putting, as boring as it sounds. On an average round of golf, you'll only use the driver ~12-14 times, so it's not worth spending too much time on. You'll be putting most likely 30+ strokes.

As for your question, if you really really want to get better with driving, look at what redhook said and probably go with a 10.5 driver.

edit: Aaaand as I read the rest of the comments, I see mine are completely redundant. Sorry.

Boss-Hog
08-08-2011, 10:45 PM
All,

I don't mean to sidetrack this thread, so forgive me if I am, but I find myself in a somewhat similar situation (though even more of a novice than the OP). I've only golfed a handful of times in my life and been to the driving range a few times, so you can imagine the results. I did take two lessons five or six years ago, but since I never used what I learned, that's all but forgotten now. Anyway, since I've never shown much interest in the sport, I've never owned any clubs, but recently, my cousin was nice enough to give me an old set that just needed a few more clubs to complete the set and I picked those up at Play it Again Sports. At this point, I'm interested in learning the basics and seeing if the game appeals to me, so if anyone has any tips on getting started or can recommend someone in the Cincinnati area for lessons for a true beginner, I'd certainly be interested in giving it a shot. Thanks for any input you can provide.

15fan
08-10-2011, 08:11 PM
BH -

You might call around to some of the area colleges to see if any of the assistant or head coaches teach lessons. We've had some good success doing that on some things for our daughter (tennis & swim lessons), and I took my lessons from a womens' coach at one of the area schools.

Boss-Hog
08-10-2011, 10:19 PM
Thanks for the advice, 15...I appreciate it.

Redhook
08-11-2011, 07:19 AM
BH -

You might call around to some of the area colleges to see if any of the assistant or head coaches teach lessons. We've had some good success doing that on some things for our daughter (tennis & swim lessons), and I took my lessons from a womens' coach at one of the area schools.

Good advice.

UC's Communiversity has a bunch of classes on various topics that they offer year round. We teach beginner and intermediate golf classes through them at Sharon Woods in the spring, summer, and fall.

bucksfan2
08-11-2011, 10:54 AM
Boss I give this advice to anyone who wants to get into playing golf. Play. I wouldn't be against taking a lesson or two to get the basic fundamentals but you gain the most from playing. I can't speak for Kyle, but I don't think you get much out of a lesson when you are just starting out as opposed to a year or so later when you have developed more of a golf game.

Play and practice. If you want to become a better golfer hit that practice green quite often. And then when you get the hang of it and have a good understanding of the game you can take lessons to take you to the next level.

Boss-Hog
08-11-2011, 11:04 AM
Boss I give this advice to anyone who wants to get into playing golf. Play. I wouldn't be against taking a lesson or two to get the basic fundamentals but you gain the most from playing. I can't speak for Kyle, but I don't think you get much out of a lesson when you are just starting out as opposed to a year or so later when you have developed more of a golf game.

Play and practice. If you want to become a better golfer hit that practice green quite often. And then when you get the hang of it and have a good understanding of the game you can take lessons to take you to the next level.

Thanks for the advice - that's exactly what I intend to do. I'm going to the driving range after my first lesson while the instruction will still be fresh in my mind.

Redhook
08-11-2011, 09:12 PM
Boss I give this advice to anyone who wants to get into playing golf. Play. I wouldn't be against taking a lesson or two to get the basic fundamentals but you gain the most from playing. I can't speak for Kyle, but I don't think you get much out of a lesson when you are just starting out as opposed to a year or so later when you have developed more of a golf game.

Play and practice. If you want to become a better golfer hit that practice green quite often. And then when you get the hang of it and have a good understanding of the game you can take lessons to take you to the next level.

I agree. Once you learn some of the key fundamentals of the game, it's imperative to play on the course. I tell people all the time to play as much as possible. Hitting balls on the range is fun and effective, but playing on the course is where you learn how to play the game.

SunDeck
08-12-2011, 10:59 AM
Play and practice. If you want to become a better golfer hit that practice green quite often. And then when you get the hang of it and have a good understanding of the game you can take lessons to take you to the next level.

It's amazing what 30 minutes around a green can do. When I was starting to play I learned by trying to get that "click" sound on chips. Then I realized it's the same thing I needed to look for in other shots. Chipping- hitting the ball first and seeing the results in accuracy, consistency, spin, etc.- is a remarkable teacher. And the real plus is that you learn how to get up and down, which is huge for the high handicapper.

GoReds33
08-14-2011, 12:58 AM
So I need to update from the past couple weeks. I have been going a few times a week to the local range with a driver I purchased from Amazon for around 30-40 dollars. I have yet to have any problems with it, and it seems to hit as far as the R7 did, if not further. My golf game is streaky at best right now, but my drives have become much more consistant. A 220 yard drive with good accuracy is no problem. I can now push it to 240-245, but I lose much of my accuracy.

This is a random question, but what is a golf scramble?

Redhook
08-14-2011, 07:06 AM
This is a random question, but what is a golf scramble?

This is a team game where all the members of a group (2-4 players) hit a tee shot. Then, the best shot is selected and the process is repeated until the ball is holed out. A scramble generally produces the lowest score and the most fun large group events.