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Brutus
08-03-2011, 04:57 PM
OK so chances are just going to be something that blows over.

However, Major League Baseball is investigating Alex Rodriguez for another high-stakes poker game he allegedly took part in. Apparently he's been warned about this before and while they don't believe he himself has ever bet on baseball, they're concerned about the people that he's hung out with.

http://espn.go.com/new-york/mlb/story/_/id/6830659/mlb-suspend-alex-rodriguez-illegal-poker


In 2005, Rodriguez had been warned about gambling in underground poker clubs by the Yankees and by baseball commissioner Bud Selig, both of whom were concerned that possible involvement with gamblers who might be betting on baseball games could result in a Pete Rose-type lifetime ban from baseball.

The article also mentions concern by MLB that A-Rod's name could turn up in a federal investigation of a physician that has been smuggling HGH and other drugs into the country. (Author's note: I can't help but chuckle at hearing a Toronto-based physician smuggling HGH in light of the conversations we've been having the last few days, but carry on)

Strikes Out Looking
08-03-2011, 08:21 PM
The rules are the rules. If A-Rod was playing in a high stakes illegal poker game then he should be tossed out of baseball and any hall of fame consideration.

savafan
08-03-2011, 10:23 PM
The rules are the rules. If A-Rod was playing in a high stakes illegal poker game then he should be tossed out of baseball and any hall of fame consideration.

Yes, consorting with gamblers, I believe, has been reason to ban players from the game in the past.

MikeThierry
08-03-2011, 10:55 PM
Yes, consorting with gamblers, I believe, has been reason to ban players from the game in the past.

Weren't the reasons why those players were banned from baseball because they directly bet on baseball itself? From what I understand, A-Rod didn't bet on baseball. Don't get me wrong, its shady as heck but playing poker is different from betting on an outcome of a game or purposely throwing a World Series for money.

LvJ
08-03-2011, 11:52 PM
Just add this to the long list of reasons why A-Rod is a disgrace to the game and should be banned.

RedEye
08-03-2011, 11:57 PM
Weren't the reasons why those players were banned from baseball because they directly bet on baseball itself? From what I understand, A-Rod didn't bet on baseball. Don't get me wrong, its shady as heck but playing poker is different from betting on an outcome of a game or purposely throwing a World Series for money.

That's my understanding as well. If he is guilty of this, it shouldn't be taken lightly, but I don't think it should exempt him from consideration for the HOF unless it is proven that he bet on the game.

BCubb2003
08-04-2011, 12:08 AM
I remember Bowie Kuhn suspending Mays and Mantle for being casino greeters in their post-playing days.

savafan
08-04-2011, 12:54 AM
I remember Bowie Kuhn suspending Mays and Mantle for being casino greeters in their post-playing days.

There was that. Actually, they were both banned for life, though the bans were overturned, same as the lifetime ban on George Steinbrenner. There have been other players who were banned simply for consorting with gamblers though.

westofyou
08-04-2011, 01:09 AM
Yes, consorting with gamblers, I believe, has been reason to ban players from the game in the past.

Since Landis I'd say not "banned" but suspended from the game is the norm, as far as players (and managers) Durocher was suspended in 1947 for hanging with "hoods" as was Denny McLain in 1970. Both were reinstated.

But Landis was a different case, Benny Kauf was banned for being associated to a car theft ring.

savafan
08-04-2011, 02:23 AM
Since Landis I'd say not "banned" but suspended from the game is the norm, as far as players (and managers) Durocher was suspended in 1947 for hanging with "hoods" as was Denny McLain in 1970. Both were reinstated.

But Landis was a different case, Benny Kauf was banned for being associated to a car theft ring.

That's true, Landis was a little ban happy:

People banned under Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis


Eight players from the Chicago White Sox were banned in 1920 for conspiring with gamblers to throw the 1919 World Series in the Black Sox scandal:

"Shoeless" Joe Jackson. (The precise extent of Jackson's involvement is a controversial question, though it is indisputable that he took $5,000 cash (equal to $63,494 today) from the gamblers and never told anyone about it until after the conspiracy was exposed. He also told the grand jury that he did not field or hit as well in key situations as he could have)
Eddie Cicotte. (The story that Cicotte (pronounced Suh-kot-e) had been promised a $10,000 bonus (equal to $126,988 today) if he won 30 games and then was denied two starts at the end of the season is unsubstantiated)
Lefty Williams lost all three of his starts in the World Series, setting a record that has never been matched.
Chick Gandil was the mastermind and ringleader of the scandal.
Fred McMullin was only a backup infielder. However, he overheard teammates discussing the fix and threatened to report them unless he was included.
Swede Risberg was one of the ringleaders of the scandal.
Happy Felsch hit and fielded poorly in the series.
Buck Weaver was banned because he knew of the conspiracy, but did not report it to MLB authorities and team ownership; Weaver successfully sued owner Charles Comiskey for his 1921 salary.

Joe Gedeon of the St. Louis Browns was banned in 1920 for allegedly conspiring with the gamblers behind the Black Sox scandal.
Eugene Paulette of the Philadelphia Phillies was banned in 1921 for associating with known gamblers.
Benny Kauff of the New York Giants was banned in 1920 for selling stolen cars. (Commissioner Landis considered him "no longer a fit companion for other ball players," despite Kauff being acquitted of the charges against him in court)
Lee Magee of the Chicago Cubs was released just before the season began. Magee sued the Cubs for his 1920 salary and lost; court testimony proved he had been involved in throwing games and collecting on bets.
Hal Chase of the New York Giants was banned in 1921 for consorting with gamblers, and betting on his own teams, among other corrupt practices. (Chase had previously been accused of fixing games as early as 1910, and was reportedly passed over for managerial opportunities due to the allegations. In 1918 Christy Mathewson had suspended Chase mid-season for fixing games, and John McGraw persuaded Mathewson to trade him to the Giants. At the end of the 1919 season, National League president John Heydler found evidence that Chase had indeed taken money from gamblers in 1918. Chase had been informally banned from the major leagues)
Heinie Zimmerman of the New York Giants was banned in 1921 for encouraging his teammates to fix games. (He had been benched by McGraw and later sent home during the 1919 season, and had been informally banned from the majors. During the 1917 World Series, he chased the winning run across the plate and found himself having to deny having helped throw the Series. Despite some of these allegations, McGraw would not turn him in, not wanting to be the one responsible for having one of his players banned for life; McGraw would suspend him indefinitely. Later McGraw would testify in court that Zimmerman conspired to fix games)
Joe Harris of the Cleveland Indians was banned for life in 1920 after he chose to play for an independent team rather than the Indians. (Harris' ban occurred prior to Landis taking office, but he was reinstated by Landis in 1922 due, in part, to his service during World War I)



Heinie Groh of the Cincinnati Reds was banned for two days in 1921 while he held out for a higher salary, and Landis gave Groh an ultimatum: play for the Reds in 1921, or face lifetime banishment. (Groh chose the former option and played out the 1921 season; he retired in 1927)
Ray Fisher of the Cincinnati Reds was banned in 1921 after he refused to play for the Reds; he had asked for his outright release when the Reds cut his salary by $1,000 (equal to $12,272 today), but the Reds refused to release him. (Fisher was hired by the University of Michigan to coach baseball later that year, and was reinstated by Commissioner Bowie Kuhn in 1980; he died in 1982)
Dickie Kerr of the Chicago White Sox was banned for life in 1921 for playing exhibition games with former banned Black Sox players. Kerr had been a member of the 1919 Black Sox team, but he won both his starts in the contested 1919 World Series and was acquitted of involvement in the conspiracy. (Kerr was reinstated in 1925)
Phil Douglas of the New York Giants was banned in 1922 after notifying an acquaintance on the St. Louis Cardinals that he planned to jump the Giants for the pennant stretch run to spite McGraw, with whom Douglas had had a severe falling out during the regular season.
Jimmy O'Connell of the New York Giants and Giants coach Cozy Dolan were banned in 1924 for offering Philadelphia Phillies shortstop Heinie Sand $500 (equal to $6,424 today) to throw a game between the two teams for O'Connell's own and his gambler backers' financial gain.
William B. Cox, Philadelphia Phillies owner, was banned in 1943 for betting on his team's games. (Cox and one of his predecessors, Horace Fogel, were both owners of the Phillies at different times and were both banned, making them thus far the only owners to be banned for life)

Unassisted
08-04-2011, 09:39 AM
I guessed from the title that this thread was going to be about the long-distance relationship that A-Rod and Pete have where Pete provides advice on hitting. Maybe Pete is providing advice on other things, too??

Strikes Out Looking
08-04-2011, 12:11 PM
Leo Durocher was suspended for the 1947 season for association with known gamblers.

Ghosts of 1990
08-04-2011, 12:17 PM
A-Rod has kept very poor company for a number of years now. Knew this was eventually going to leak out or something like it ever since I read this article:

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/eticket/story?page=roseandarod

Guy doesn't seem to associate with the best people.

George Anderson
08-04-2011, 12:23 PM
What role will the players union have in this??

It seems most of the suspensions or bans came before the players union existed.

Rose, Mantle and Mays were no longer playing so the players union could not protect them.

RBA
08-04-2011, 12:36 PM
But it is a-okay for Baseball Teams/Owners rake in millions of dollars in Casino money in exchange for adverting in stadiums, radio, and television?

blumj
08-05-2011, 01:05 PM
But it is a-okay for Baseball Teams/Owners rake in millions of dollars in Casino money in exchange for adverting in stadiums, radio, and television?

Yes, it's okay because it's legal, A-Rod can play as much poker as he wants at Mohegan Sun.

Unassisted
08-05-2011, 01:15 PM
I guessed from the title that this thread was going to be about the long-distance relationship that A-Rod and Pete have where Pete provides advice on hitting. Earlier thread (http://www.redszone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=69376) and full ESPN article (http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/eticket/story?page=roseandarod&campaign=rss&source=MLBHeadlines) discussing this. Makes for interesting re-reading, in light of current events.