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View Full Version : Great Minds Thinking Alike or Shilldom?



Guacarock
08-19-2011, 03:17 AM
You be the judge, the jury, the defense lawyer or the executioner in interpreting the simultaneous appearance today of these two pieces in different media outlets serving the Cincinnati market.

First up, some dude who fashions himself as the Doc pontificating in the local Gannettoid fishwrap:

http://news.cincinnati.com/article/20110818/COL03/308180072/Doc-Votto-shouldn-t-move-from-first-base?odyssey=tab|topnews|text|Reds

And, lo and behold, if you turn to the cyber "This Is Reds Country," the official site of the Cincinnati Reds, you'll find the exact same meme being planted in the context of a purportedly newsy baseball feature:

http://cincinnati.reds.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20110818&content_id=23396172&vkey=news_cin&c_id=cin

My questions to you, Redszoners wherever you might hang your hats around the world:

* If we're seeing a concerted campaign here, does it bother you in the slightest? Are you swayed? When you read an article, whether in print or electronic platforms, are you inclined to trust its veracity or question the source and demand more transparency?

* Secondarily, what's your take on Cincinnati's local media outlets? Independent or house organs? Profound or superficial? Hard-working or lazy, journalistic pack rats?

This isn't the thread to weigh in pro or con on the Votto-Alonso debate, but rather a thread allowing you a chance to discuss the caliber of the Reds' press coverage. We all know we could do a better job than Dusty and Walt, but do you feel the same way about the scribes assigned to the Reds beat? How would you approach the franchise any differently than they do? Could you handle the rigors of a daily deadline? How would you cultivate respect and sources without burning bridges or letting someone pull your chain like a trained organ-grinder monkey?

Be as blunt and brutal, or as obscure and obsequious, as you'd like. Points go for those who are funny and original, whichever tack you prefer to take.

dougdirt
08-19-2011, 03:29 AM
I think there is a line that needs to be walked, especially in a city like Cincinnati where there aren't people asking the tough questions, or when they do and get a crappy answer, asking another question about the situation. In tougher cities where the beat guys do ask tougher questions, they can generally get more leeway, but here they may just be blackballed. Not sure if you are a Bengals fan, but a few years ago a beat writer was essentially kicked off of the beat because he challenged Marvin Lewis' response to a question he asked because he didn't really answer the question. I have really yet to see anyone covering the Reds to come back at Dusty when he gives a very generic and avoiding the question answer. They tend to just move on to something else rather than ask "What does that have to do with the question I asked". I have to walk out of the door and I have a lot more to say on the topic, so hopefully tomorrow I can get back to this.

Cooper
08-19-2011, 08:35 AM
Hal McCoy does a nice job of walking that line. He reports problems, but often you have to read between the lines and then when that player or manager leaves -you get the full story on causes, strengths/limitations. I wish he would fill us (the fans) in with more info, but he has to keep his channels open.

lollipopcurve
08-19-2011, 09:30 AM
Beat guys are tame. I think that's pretty much par for the industry. Feature guys like Daugherty can be more outspoken. In this case, he's a personal fan of Votto -- Votto had just given him a good interview, and Daugherty likes guys who can think. I don't think the two writers are in unison here in any concrete way.

mace
08-19-2011, 11:31 AM
This sort of coincidence happens all the time. It's because reporters gather around a player who happens to be saying something. Sometimes--say, if a guy was just injured, or had a big game--the press corps will approach the player in concert. Other times, somebody like Doc might be conducting an interview, there's nothing else going on in the clubhouse, and pretty soon the player is talking to five or six reporters. They just sort of glob-on to the discussion. If the player says something newsworthy, it then appears all over the place. I suspect that's what happened here.

So, under your list of options, Guac, this would probably meet the "pack rat" criteria.

Roy Tucker
08-19-2011, 12:24 PM
This sort of coincidence happens all the time. It's because reporters gather around a player who happens to be saying something. Sometimes--say, if a guy was just injured, or had a big game--the press corps will approach the player in concert. Other times, somebody like Doc might be conducting an interview, there's nothing else going on in the clubhouse, and pretty soon the player is talking to five or six reporters. They just sort of glob-on to the discussion. If the player says something newsworthy, it then appears all over the place. I suspect that's what happened here.

So, under your list of options, Guac, this would probably meet the "pack rat" criteria.

That's my take too. The reporters are all standing in a circle around a guy and then we get different flavors of the same story.

You'll often see the exact same quote in different stories. What is a little funny/sad is that they all act like its an exclusive. Plus you'll see the video of it on channnels 5/9/12/19.