PDA

View Full Version : Who is watching "Catching Hell" tonight?



jredmo2
09-27-2011, 11:50 AM
I was a little wary, because hear in Chicago, I hear about Bartman a lot, and it's annoying.

But I hear that it features a sync between the video footage and the radio broadcast as Bartman would have been hearing it... and, yeah. Not missing that.

cumberlandreds
09-27-2011, 12:53 PM
I have my DVR set. It will be interesting how ESPN will portray him and the entire incident.

Caveat Emperor
09-27-2011, 01:31 PM
I have my DVR set. It will be interesting how ESPN will portray him and the entire incident.

There was a piece on NPR's website that indicates the documentary will serve as an exoneration piece for Bartman.

RiverRat13
09-27-2011, 02:02 PM
My DVR is set.

Chip R
09-27-2011, 02:16 PM
My DVR is set.

As is mine. I've heard it was really good.

Sean_CaseyRules
10-02-2011, 10:33 PM
One of the kids interviews that was featured is a guy I work with during my part time security job in Columbus. Bartman was his baseball coach at that time lol

cumberlandreds
10-03-2011, 01:33 PM
Another very good documentary piece by ESPN. It portrayed Bartman as best they could without the ability to actually interview him. He seemed to be a very quiet person who didn't realize at first what happened. I thought it was very good how they linked up the radio broadcast that he was listening to in synched to the actual play. They also showed how a "lynch" mob can form very quickly. I'm sure if security hadn't reacted as quickly as they did Bartman would not have made it out of Wrigley alive. It was getting as nasty as things could get in a very big hurry. I wonder if Bartman still has any contact with his "friends". They ditchcd him pretty quickly after the incident.
I don't think I ever knew that Bartman made a public apology soon after all of this happened. I think that was his way of trying to put things behind and probably, honestly thought that would make things right. Just a terrible shame how things worked out for him. The other guy that was reaching for the ball was certainly relieved he didn't touch it. There was a lot of focus on him and his relief.
Maybe this happened but the Cubs should have reached out to Bartman in some way to let him know that nothing was held against him. I don't know what, but something public anyway. If they have never done anything like this then they deserves all the bad breaks that come their way for the next 100 years.
What Bartman did was nothing more than any other fan would have done. What he did didn't cost the Cubs the game or the pennant. The error that Gonzalez made was the killer and more should have been made over that. But it was easier to make some nerdy looking fan a scapegoat rather than an athletes physical error. (also a good segment on how the term "scapegoat" came into being)

jredmo2
10-03-2011, 06:42 PM
Another very good documentary piece by ESPN. It portrayed Bartman as best they could without the ability to actually interview him. He seemed to be a very quiet person who didn't realize at first what happened. I thought it was very good how they linked up the radio broadcast that he was listening to in synched to the actual play. They also showed how a "lynch" mob can form very quickly. I'm sure if security hadn't reacted as quickly as they did Bartman would not have made it out of Wrigley alive. It was getting as nasty as things could get in a very big hurry. I wonder if Bartman still has any contact with his "friends". They ditchcd him pretty quickly after the incident.
I don't think I ever knew that Bartman made a public apology soon after all of this happened. I think that was his way of trying to put things behind and probably, honestly thought that would make things right. Just a terrible shame how things worked out for him. The other guy that was reaching for the ball was certainly relieved he didn't touch it. There was a lot of focus on him and his relief.
Maybe this happened but the Cubs should have reached out to Bartman in some way to let him know that nothing was held against him. I don't know what, but something public anyway. If they have never done anything like this then they deserves all the bad breaks that come their way for the next 100 years.
What Bartman did was nothing more than any other fan would have done. What he did didn't cost the Cubs the game or the pennant. The error that Gonzalez made was the killer and more should have been made over that. But it was easier to make some nerdy looking fan a scapegoat rather than an athletes physical error. (also a good segment on how the term "scapegoat" came into being)

Made the Cubs fans look terrible, and rightly so. The best part of the documentary was how well it conveyed how ugly the atmosphere got at that game.