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View Full Version : Anyone else doing the Paleo/Primal thing?



Rojo
01-06-2012, 07:04 PM
I did it kinda half-cheeked for a little last year and saw some pretty encouraging results. Now I'm going whole hog (ha, ha) this January.

A week and I've already taken my belt down a notch and my mood has elevated considerably. I guess we really are supposed to eat this way.

Breakfast: 3 hard boiled eggs, 1 sausage

Lunch: I 6oz can of salmon w/dab-o-may, 1 avocado, 4 or 5 string cheese sticks wrapped in turkey slices. 1 small apple

Dinner: I mix it up here. Either a rib-eye steak or groundbeef with veggies or half a chicken or a bunch of ribs plus a whole mess of veggies with whatever meat entree I choose. Tonight I'm going to grab a mess of oysters.

Before bed I have a glass of blueberry/coconut smoothie or tea with butter, yes butter.

Hunt, gather, repeat. Works for me.

dabvu2498
01-06-2012, 10:20 PM
That doesn't sound too hateful. Sounds like quite a bit to eat, actually.

I'm doing the "3rd World Diet" this month... Beans, tortillas, rice, and oatmeal only. Of course, I'm taking vitamin supplements, but still, it sucks. But I am losing weight... I guess.

I'd strangle you for one of your string cheese sticks.

Razor Shines
01-07-2012, 01:58 AM
I did it kinda half-cheeked for a little last year and saw some pretty encouraging results. Now I'm going whole hog (ha, ha) this January.

A week and I've already taken my belt down a notch and my mood has elevated considerably. I guess we really are supposed to eat this way.

Breakfast: 3 hard boiled eggs, 1 sausage

Lunch: I 6oz can of salmon w/dab-o-may, 1 avocado, 4 or 5 string cheese sticks wrapped in turkey slices. 1 small apple

Dinner: I mix it up here. Either a rib-eye steak or groundbeef with veggies or half a chicken or a bunch of ribs plus a whole mess of veggies with whatever meat entree I choose. Tonight I'm going to grab a mess of oysters.

Before bed I have a glass of blueberry/coconut smoothie or tea with butter, yes butter.

Hunt, gather, repeat. Works for me.

Similar to the way I eat, except I eat more beans. I love it. Went from 39 7/8" waist last November to 31 1/4" now.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

GAC
01-07-2012, 06:38 AM
So you know it's working if your knuckles start to drag the ground? :D

Eric_the_Red
01-07-2012, 04:18 PM
A diet so easy.....

http://www.cryptomundo.com/wp-content/uploads/caveman_1.jpg

RedsManRick
01-07-2012, 04:56 PM
I simply cut out all refined carbs and sugar. I'll have the occasional craving, but generally it's been pretty easy. Down 10 poounds (240 to 230 -- I'm 6'1") in a month.

RANDY IN INDY
01-07-2012, 05:06 PM
I did it kinda half-cheeked for a little last year and saw some pretty encouraging results. Now I'm going whole hog (ha, ha) this January.

A week and I've already taken my belt down a notch and my mood has elevated considerably. I guess we really are supposed to eat this way.

Breakfast: 3 hard boiled eggs, 1 sausage

Lunch: I 6oz can of salmon w/dab-o-may, 1 avocado, 4 or 5 string cheese sticks wrapped in turkey slices. 1 small apple

Dinner: I mix it up here. Either a rib-eye steak or groundbeef with veggies or half a chicken or a bunch of ribs plus a whole mess of veggies with whatever meat entree I choose. Tonight I'm going to grab a mess of oysters.

Before bed I have a glass of blueberry/coconut smoothie or tea with butter, yes butter.

Hunt, gather, repeat. Works for me.

Got any more info, rojo? I am trying to do the Suzzane Sommers thing. It worked for me a few years back. I'm 6' 1" and weigh around 200lbs. Would love to loose about 15 pounds, just to feel better and have a little more energy.

Redsfaithful
01-07-2012, 05:16 PM
I'm thinking pretty seriously about trying this. Here's a shopping list I've been considering:

http://robbwolf.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/shopping-list.pdf (PDF)

Moving this week into a new house so putting it off, but I think I'm going to do it once we are settled in.

Rojo
01-07-2012, 05:22 PM
I simply cut out all refined carbs and sugar. I'll have the occasional craving, but generally it's been pretty easy. Down 10 poounds (240 to 230 -- I'm 6'1") in a month.

That's it, simplified. I should explain that the reason it's call "Paleo" or "Primal" (or "Warrior" or "Hunter/Gatherer") is because it follows the diet of our pre-agriculture ancestors.

Agriculture, so goes the reasoning, has been around about 10,000 years. But for 100,000 or more years before that, man ate meat, fish, forage, fruit and nuts. Grains, beans, legumes, dairy are all recent innovations that we've not fully evolved to eat.

Now, when I say we haven't "evolved" to eat these things, that's non entirely true. Our bodies have adapted. The enzimes that break down dairy, for example, developed about 3000 years ago, but are still absent for many people (not me, a Northern European mutt). Many people have adapted to grains, but not all of us and not in the same degree. American Indians and South Pacific Islanders, for example, have only recently had grains introduced into their diet and have grown huge and diabetic because of it.

Anyhow, it's not a walk in the park. I don't miss sweets so much, nor big plates of pasta but I miss the bread that accompanies many meals -- tortillas, sandwiches, cheeseburgers. It's also expensive, especially if you try to eat quality, grass-fed meat, like you should.

But, most people (especially men) loose weight quickly (just weighed myself this morning, 2lbs down in 5 days) without going hungry. I can put up with depriving myself of certain tasty foods, but I don't want to go hungry.

Rojo
01-07-2012, 05:35 PM
I'm thinking pretty seriously about trying this. Here's a shopping list I've been considering:

http://robbwolf.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/shopping-list.pdf (PDF)

Moving this week into a new house so putting it off, but I think I'm going to do it once we are settled in.

Good list. I printed it out. Wolf is probably THE "paleo" guy. I got into via Mark Sisson, who's THE "primal" guy. There's some differences but they're basically the same thing. Sisson's site, with an informative forum, is here:

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/#axzz1ioIUOhbk

I noticed wild caught salmon on the list. One money-saving tip: almost all canned salmon is wild caught. This is what I part of my lunch every day:

http://chickenofthesea.com/product_line_detail.aspx?did=480860

RedsManRick
01-07-2012, 06:00 PM
That's it, simplified. I should explain that the reason it's call "Paleo" or "Primal" (or "Warrior" or "Hunter/Gatherer") is because it follows the diet of our pre-agriculture ancestors.

Agriculture, so goes the reasoning, has been around about 10,000 years. But for 100,000 or more years before that, man ate meat, fish, forage, fruit and nuts. Grains, beans, legumes, dairy are all recent innovations that we've not fully evolved to eat.

Right, I'm doing a very light version of the same idea. Our bodies didn't evolve to eat muffins and pasta. They can handle fats much better. And being able to eat as much as you want of the "good stuff" really helps. I've gotten to become a big fan of roasted broccoli or brussel sprouts with some parmesean or feta.

I should say the other big change I've made is drinking a lot more water -- like 10+ cups a day.

757690
01-07-2012, 06:25 PM
I'd rather be fat and die ten years earlier than give up bread and pasta. :)

westofyou
01-07-2012, 07:10 PM
That's it, simplified. I should explain that the reason it's call "Paleo" or "Primal" (or "Warrior" or "Hunter/Gatherer") is because it follows the diet of our pre-agriculture ancestors.

Agriculture, so goes the reasoning, has been around about 10,000 years. But for 100,000 or more years before that, man ate meat, fish, forage, fruit and nuts. Grains, beans, legumes, dairy are all recent innovations that we've not fully evolved to eat.

Now, when I say we haven't "evolved" to eat these things, that's non entirely true. Our bodies have adapted. The enzimes that break down dairy, for example, developed about 3000 years ago, but are still absent for many people (not me, a Northern European mutt). Many people have adapted to grains, but not all of us and not in the same degree. American Indians and South Pacific Islanders, for example, have only recently had grains introduced into their diet and have grown huge and diabetic because of it.

Anyhow, it's not a walk in the park. I don't miss sweets so much, nor big plates of pasta but I miss the bread that accompanies many meals -- tortillas, sandwiches, cheeseburgers. It's also expensive, especially if you try to eat quality, grass-fed meat, like you should.

But, most people (especially men) loose weight quickly (just weighed myself this morning, 2lbs down in 5 days) without going hungry. I can put up with depriving myself of certain tasty foods, but I don't want to go hungry.

Our bodies have hard time breaking down meat however, not to mention the factory farm effect on the ecosystem.

Haven't eaten beef or pork in 23 years, chicken or fish 18 years, and here I am still ticking.

Moderation and exercise is the key to weight, and avoiding fast food and corn syrup sure helps bunches too.

Rojo
01-08-2012, 12:37 AM
Our bodies have hard time breaking down meat however, not to mention the factory farm effect on the ecosystem.

Agree with the factory farm part. Not sure I agree with the "meat" party.


Haven't eaten beef or pork in 23 years, chicken or fish 18 years, and here I am still ticking.

There's more than one way to skin a cat. Thing is, I eat more vegetables now than I did before, and probably more than a lot of vegetarians, who are often pastaterians.


Moderation and exercise is the key to weight, and avoiding fast food and corn syrup sure helps bunches too.

Avoid fast food and corn syrup -- absolutely. Moderation is open to interpretation. Exercise? You need it. But without controlling your diet, it's hard to loose weight with just exercise.

Tonight: a mess of spare ribs, collard greens, both dosed liberally with sriracha and a couple (or more) of Four-Roses-and-sodas.

GAC
01-08-2012, 05:49 AM
Been slow cooking an English rump roast since last night. Mmmmmm. Try taking meat away from me and you'll see someone go primal! :D

Johnny Footstool
01-08-2012, 11:49 AM
Cutting calories is the key to any diet. Cutting refined carbs and sugars is a great way to do that.

IslandRed
01-08-2012, 02:44 PM
Cutting calories is the key to any diet. Cutting refined carbs and sugars is a great way to do that.

Yep. Paleo, primal, less ancient throwbacks e.g. the 100-Year diet concept (don't eat anything your great-great-grandparents wouldn't recognize immediately as food), or even things like South Beach (good carbs, good fats) all seem to have the same basic principles if not the same hook -- we're stuffing ourselves with too much crap, and we can lose weight and improve overall health by simply eating the right stuff without worrying too much about portion sizes or calorie counting.

Of course, that's a lot easier said than done, being a confirmed pastaholic. Nonetheless, I'm resolved to try soon. (I knew better than to start a New Year's diet-and-exercise resolution precisely on New Year's. Too many extended football-watching couch sessions early in January, which are a land mine for this sort of thing.)

Hoosier Red
01-08-2012, 10:02 PM
Cutting calories is the key to any diet. Cutting refined carbs and sugars is a great way to do that.

Agreed. I really need to change my diet as I'm at 5'9" and 240 lbs. I've really just never been able to get into a decent routine that I stay with for more than a week.

westofyou
01-09-2012, 03:21 AM
http://www.westonaprice.org/traditional-diets/guts-and-grease




The hunter-gatherer's dinner is front page news these days. Drawing from the writings of Dr. Boyd Eaton and Professor Loren Cordain, experts in the so-called Paleolithic diet, columnists and reporters are spreading the word about the health benefits of a diet rich in protein and high in fiber from a variety of plant foods 1,2. It's actually amusing to see what the modern food pundits come up with as examples of the "Paleolithic Prescription." Jean Carper offers a Stone Age Salad of mixed greens, garbanzo beans, skinless chicken breast, walnuts and fresh herbs, mixed with a dressing made of orange juice, balsamic vinegar and canola oil.3 Elizabeth Somer suggests wholewheat waffles with fat-free cream cheese, coleslaw with nonfat dressing, grilled halibut with spinach, grilled tofu and vegetables over rice, nonfat milk, canned apricots and mineral water, along with prawns and clams. Her Stone Age food pyramid includes plenty of plant foods, extra lean meat and fish, nonfat milk products, and honey and eggs in small amounts.4
Above all, the food writers tell us, avoid fats, especially saturated fats. The hunter-gatherer's diet was highly politically correct, they say, rich in polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids but relatively low in overall fat and very low in that dietary villain-saturated fat. This is the one dietary factor that health officials tell us is responsible for all the health problems that plague us-everything from cancer and heart disease to obesity and MS.

Rojo
01-09-2012, 01:57 PM
http://www.westonaprice.org/traditional-diets/guts-and-grease

I'm pretty sure that native people didn't remove the skin. They had no AMA.

Rojo
01-09-2012, 02:06 PM
Of course, that's a lot easier said than done, being a confirmed pastaholic.

It is. I'd kill for a cracker. But it's also easier "done" than most calorie counting or low fat diets which work very slowly and often leave you hungry.

Most people would look at the "very slowly" part and say that's a good thing. I don't. Most of us flawed human beings need to feel fairly measured progress and need to walk away from the table with a level of satiety an need to enjoy our meals.

Deprivation satisfies a psychological need for things to be difficult-- blame our deep-seated puritanism. The problem is that it's just not sustainable. A week of boiled haddock sends us back to Pizza Hut.

757690
01-09-2012, 04:39 PM
http://www.westonaprice.org/traditional-diets/guts-and-grease

Thanks. Nice article.

What people forget about our hunter/gatherer ancestors is that they had no idea when their next meal would be, so they loaded up on high fat foods, or carbs that turned into fat.

As anyone who has tried to lose weight, fat takes quite awhile and effort to burn off, so if you might have to go a week in between meals, you want that meal to be high in fat. You really didn't care about heart disease or high blood pressure, as you were more concerned with not starving to death. Vegetables and other low fat foods burn off too quickly, and require to be eaten on a constant basis to stave off hunger, so they weren't desired.

Presently, our bodies have not adapted to the fact that we can find food easily, whenever we want, so we still crave comfort foods that add fat to our bodies, and don't find salads to be very satisfying. However, most likely in a few generations, we will adapt and start craving broccoli over mac and cheese. I pity the future. lol

Johnny Footstool
01-09-2012, 06:09 PM
I do think it's odd that people are adopting a diet from a time when the average life expectancy was in the low-30s. :)

Sea Ray
01-10-2012, 03:44 PM
I do think it's odd that people are adopting a diet from a time when the average life expectancy was in the low-30s. :)

Didn't Adam and Eve live about 900 years?

Redsfaithful
01-11-2012, 01:50 AM
Didn't Adam and Eve live about 900 years?

This is my favorite post ever on RedsZone.

Johnny Footstool
01-11-2012, 10:41 AM
Didn't Adam and Eve live about 900 years?

They were on a more sinless diet.

Sea Ray
01-11-2012, 11:46 PM
This is my favorite post ever on RedsZone.

Thanks but I probably authored the worst post you've ever seen on Redszone too...;)

lidspinner
01-19-2012, 09:12 AM
I have done the portion diet and it works like a champ...might take a bit longer to lose the weight but you dont have any of the side effects of a normal diet...like bad mood or cravings or any of that normal stuff like strangling someone for string cheese..LOL.....

basically eat most of what you normally would eat, maybe cook a bit healthier, like grill instead of fried food....but portion your food out....for breakfast, make whatever you would normally eat, make it last 3 meals....I used to eat a big breakfst at 6am....now I eat a little tiny portion at 6, then another at 730 and more of it at 9am.....I then will eat a fruit for a snack around 1030 then around lunch I will eat another very small portion of my lunch at noon....eat a bit more at 130 and finish it off around 3pm......repeat this when you get home with a fruit then supper....try to stop eating about an hour or 2 before bed.....

I lost 25lbs on my small frame just from doing this...even eating mcdonalds....I would split a double cheeseburger plain into 3 portions.....it works, you just have to stick to it and not cheat...you will be shocked at how easy it really is....

the biggest issue with this diet is when you have a supper with family or friends, like at a party or Thanksgiving.....its hard to go back to eating big meals when your stomach has adjusted to small portions....I get a sick feeling now when I eat a big meal, almost want to puke....its changed my whole way of living and I like it.

Rojo
01-19-2012, 03:21 PM
I lost 25lbs on my small frame just from doing this...even eating mcdonalds....I would split a double cheeseburger plain into 3 portions.....it works, you just have to stick to it and not cheat...you will be shocked at how easy it really is....

You left out the part where you throw yourself off the highest bridge.

A third of double cheeseburger? There's no way on God's Green Earth I could do that. Better to skip McDonald's and fix up a rack of ribs, a mess of collard greens and a big glass of Four Roses.

lidspinner
01-20-2012, 02:24 PM
You left out the part where you throw yourself off the highest bridge.

A third of double cheeseburger? There's no way on God's Green Earth I could do that. Better to skip McDonald's and fix up a rack of ribs, a mess of collard greens and a big glass of Four Roses.

hahaha.....it really wasnt that hard to get going....first week was a little confusing but after that it started to get kind of easy...it was nice having energy all day and not feeling bloated after eating a monster meal.....like I said earlier, hardest part is eating that first big meal after you have been eating small meals....you will feel like a turd. I placed my daughter on this diet and she lost 7 pounds in 2 weeks and she eats like any teenager would...chips, candy bars, junk, junk, junk....you have to truly portion it out....

rack of ribs, steamed veggies and a glass of Honey Wine from Valley Vineyards sounds like a great start.

Rojo
01-20-2012, 02:50 PM
it was nice having energy all day and not feeling bloated after eating a monster meal

I can tell you that high-protein/low carb does the above really, really well. Bloat comes from carbs.

But I'm glad it's working for you. There's more than one way to skin a cat.

Why there's even one way, I never could figure.

bigredmechanism
01-21-2012, 02:46 PM
I can tell you that high-protein/low carb does the above really, really well. Bloat comes from carbs.

Indeed. I've been doing low carb since 1/2/12. lost ~8lbs so far, but it looks and feels like I dropped 20.