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jojo
04-13-2012, 02:28 PM
Dave Cameron does the heavy lifting on this one at fangraphs:

http://www.fangraphs.com/blogs/index.php/breaking-down-the-unwritten-rules/

He lists the rule and then comments on it's feasibility.

Here's a teaser:


15. Take a strike when your club is behind in a ballgame.
In other words, do whatever you need to do to get on base and start a rally. Of course, if you believe that taking strikes is more likely to lead to getting on base, then you should probably adopt this as a strategy all the time. Getting on base more often is never bad.

Clearly Cameron meant to add the caveat, "unless getting on base more happens so much that the bases become clogged"... :beerme:

Enjoy.

jojo
04-13-2012, 02:31 PM
Here's one that actually strikes an exposed nerve at the moment:



24. Don’t use your stopper in a tie game—only when you’re ahead.
No, no, a thousand times no. This one is just horribly wrong.

cbowen2112
04-13-2012, 02:35 PM
24. Don’t use your stopper in a tie game—only when you’re ahead.

No, no, a thousand times no. This one is just horribly wrong.



This was my favorite one. Especially after yesterday's game.


Did not see that you posted this...wow. We both agree then:)

oneupper
04-13-2012, 02:46 PM
31. Don't call your closer a "stopper".

A "stopper" is a starting pitcher who tends to win after a team loss, hence "stopping" a losing streak.

Mr. Cameron should know better. :)

Johnny Footstool
04-13-2012, 03:22 PM
31. Don't call your closer a "stopper".

A "stopper" is a starting pitcher who tends to win after a team loss, hence "stopping" a losing streak.

Mr. Cameron should know better. :)

In ancient times, "stopper" was still the preferred term, because your bullpen "stopper" came in to stop rallies, not necessarily just to close the game.

But yes, "stopper" was also used to describe starters who regularly stop a losing streak.

Johnny Footstool
04-13-2012, 03:22 PM
BTW - these aren't unwritten rules anymore.

Rojo
04-13-2012, 03:38 PM
7. Don’t steal when you’re well ahead.

IIRC, there was a famous flap between Giant's skipper Roger Craig and Cardinal's manager Whitey Herzog. With a huge lead, the Cards were still stealing bases. Craig and the Giants took offense. Herzog said something to the effect, "I'll tell my guys to stop stealing bases, if he tells his guys to stop hitting home runs."

TheNext44
04-13-2012, 03:44 PM
Here's one that actually strikes an exposed nerve at the moment:

I wouldn't call it a rule, but I would avoid using your closer in a tie game on the road.

Roy Tucker
04-13-2012, 04:19 PM
I before E except after C

elfmanvt07
04-13-2012, 04:25 PM
27. Hit the ball where it’s pitched.

“Unless you’re Jose Bautista, in which case, pull everything.” Again, decent advice to teach a youngster how to hit, but doesn’t really apply to most Major League players, who already have developed strengths and weaknesses at the plate. You don’t want your pull-power slugger just trying to loop every outside pitch the other way. If he can’t pull it, not swinging is probably a better option.

Does anyone else think that this is coming back around again? When the hitters of record were guys like Sosa, Bonds, and the like, I could understand the rebuttal. There are still hitters who hit only one way, but it's refreshing to see guys like Votto who can hit for power, but also will choke up after two strikes.

Yachtzee
04-13-2012, 05:18 PM
27. Hit the ball where it’s pitched.

“Unless you’re Jose Bautista, in which case, pull everything.” Again, decent advice to teach a youngster how to hit, but doesn’t really apply to most Major League players, who already have developed strengths and weaknesses at the plate. You don’t want your pull-power slugger just trying to loop every outside pitch the other way. If he can’t pull it, not swinging is probably a better option.

Does anyone else think that this is coming back around again? When the hitters of record were guys like Sosa, Bonds, and the like, I could understand the rebuttal. There are still hitters who hit only one way, but it's refreshing to see guys like Votto who can hit for power, but also will choke up after two strikes.

I think the real message here is to know the strengths and weaknesses of your hitters and put them in a position to succeed. I think good hitting coaches and managers understand the players they're dealing with. If you have a guy who can hit to all fields with good bat control, by all means, this advice is good. Such a hitter can slap a hit to the opposite field, no problem. However, if you have a guy with a big bat who has problems with outside pitches, I'd rather he lay off those and wait for a pitch he can drive.

TOBTTReds
04-13-2012, 10:58 PM
BTW - these aren't unwritten rules anymore.

That was my first though.

Razor Shines
04-14-2012, 02:32 AM
I think the real message here is to know the strengths and weaknesses of your hitters and put them in a position to succeed. I think good hitting coaches and managers understand the players they're dealing with. If you have a guy who can hit to all fields with good bat control, by all means, this advice is good. Such a hitter can slap a hit to the opposite field, no problem. However, if you have a guy with a big bat who has problems with outside pitches, I'd rather he lay off those and wait for a pitch he can drive.

Yes, that is what it means to me.

Of course you'd love all your hitters to be like Votto and able to drive the ball to all fields, but most guys just aren't that talented. If I have a power hitter that doesn't go the other way very well I'd want him to be more like Bonds at the plate and basically only swing if it's a pitch he can hit into the Cove.


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