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wheels
04-30-2012, 09:14 PM
By most accounts, I can be sentimental, but not too overt. I can be described as an Objectivist, not religious, and an avowed political atheist. I need numbers, empirical proof and all of that.

Thing is, I saw that commercial on MLB Network today. You know the one. Cute kids riding on Dad's shoulders, sentimental music obvious in the foreground. I got choked up.

Last time I took Mom and Dad to a game, I thought it to be a logistical nightmare. They were in a terrible crash the previous Christmas and were dealing with various and sundry residual ailments. Slow to walk The steps leading from the parking garage to the main concourse. I was annoyed. They hated our seats, it was hot. The Red Sox were mercilessly bludgeoning Homer Bailey, and it wasn't a great time. I swore I'd never take them to another game.

Fast forward to this afternoon. Pop has been in a dizzy funk for the last eight months or so. Numerous tests were done, and an MRI found some suspicious abnormalities. Lots of them. The oncologist is flummoxed. This guy is trained to find cancers and either destroy them, or at least alleviate symptoms to make the transition to the hereafter a bit more palatable. I honestly don't know whether I should be happy that he couldn't diagnose the dreaded disease today, or if I should be ever more fearful of what tomorrow's cat scan will reveal.

See... Cancers in the brain almost never begin there in middle aged folks. He has shown no signs of lung cancer, he's had a colonoscopy recently. He doesn't feel sick. He feels drunk, and it's not getting worse. It seems like it's getting better. We aren't out of the woods, but we've still got a compass.

Point is... Baseball is my sanctuary. It's easy to forget that. It's easy to take it for granted. This is not that kind of game, though. This is a thread that binds families (especially one as small as ours). Mom, narrowly missed being hit by a scorching Adam Dunn homer in 2006 out in the Sun Deck. Me, sheepishly standing next to Tom Lawless on picture day, glove in hand, one sock higher than the other. Dad, rushing home to tell me he just wrote Paul Oniell's dad's homeowners policy, and how can I forget him for plopping down those two tickets to Game Two. He couldn't go, but he was fine with me and my best friend driving down to that World Series game by ourselves at age 16.

I don't know how this ends. I'm glad for that. I guess I will know more in the coming days, but I do know that the doc agrees that whatever this is, it isn't particularly aggressive. I have time, and I will drag those two whiners to another ballgame, or six. We need it.

Point is, it's easy to take it for granted. But we all know we shouldn't.

RANDY IN INDY
04-30-2012, 09:20 PM
By most accounts, I can be sentimental, but not too overt. I can be described as an Objectivist, not religious, and an avowed political atheist. I need numbers, empirical proof and all of that.

Thing is, I saw that commercial on MLB Network today. You know the one. Cute kids riding on Dad's shoulders, sentimental music obvious in the foreground. I got choked up.

Last time I took Mom and Dad to a game, I thought it to be a logistical nightmare. They were in a terrible crash the previous Christmas and were dealing with various and sundry residual ailments. Slow to walk The steps leading from the parking garage to the main concourse. I was annoyed. They hated our seats, it was hot. The Red Sox were mercilessly bludgeoning Homer Bailey, and it wasn't a great time. I swore I'd never take them to another game.

Fast forward to this afternoon. Pop has been in a dizzy funk for the last eight months or so. Numerous tests were done, and an MRI found some suspicious abnormalities. Lots of them. The oncologist is flummoxed. This guy is trained to find cancers and either destroy them, or at least alleviate symptoms to make the transition to the hereafter a bit more palatable. I honestly don't know whether I should be happy that he couldn't diagnose the dreaded disease today, or if I should be ever more fearful of what tomorrow's cat scan will reveal.

See... Cancers in the brain almost never begin there in middle aged folks. He has shown no signs of lung cancer, he's had a colonoscopy recently. He doesn't feel sick. He feels drunk, and it's not getting worse. It seems like it's getting better. We aren't out of the woods, but we've still got a compass.

Point is... Baseball is my sanctuary. It's easy to forget that. It's easy to take it for granted. This is not that kind of game, though. This is a thread that binds families (especially one as small as ours). Mom, narrowly missed being hit by a scorching Adam Dunn homer in 2006 out in the Sun Deck. Me, sheepishly standing next to Tom Lawless on picture day, glove in hand, one sock higher than the other. Dad, rushing home to tell me he just wrote Paul Oniell's dad's homeowners policy, and how can I forget him for plopping down those two tickets to Game Two. He couldn't go, but he was fine with me and my best friend driving down to that World Series game by ourselves at age 16.

I don't know how this ends. I'm glad for that. I guess I will know more in the coming days, but I do know that the doc agrees that whatever this is, it isn't particularly aggressive. I have time, and I will drag those two whiners to another ballgame, or six. We need it.

Point is, it's easy to take it for granted. But we all know we shouldn't.

:beerme:

Blimpie
04-30-2012, 09:21 PM
Wheels--

Sorry to hear that you have been going through all that. You are right to take note of the simple pleasures in life whenever you are faced with times like these.

God bless.

Tommyjohn25
04-30-2012, 09:27 PM
Best of luck to you and your family, Wheels. My Dad turned 70 last year, and he and I have always had a strong bond formed around the sport of baseball. I have been having the same thoughts the last couple years about not taking things for granted. Take your pops to a game and buy him a hot dog, maybe even splurge on some good seats. I have done so, and plan on continuing to do so until it isn't possible anymore.

wheels
04-30-2012, 09:29 PM
I really didn't think that post out all too well. I dont really care, though. Just thought it would be appropriate here. This is were my main baseball friends are. Things like this are really why The Old Red Guard was created. I just wonder how many of us remember those early days.

I didn't think I'd be using it for this reason so soon, and maybe I'm jumping the proverbial gun. I HOPE I am.

I'm not ready for that/this part of my life to be over.

It's precious, and Baseball is a huge part of it. We can't forget that, and we simply cannot allow ourselves to not appreciate every season, every game we watch. Kvetch, whine, comment, criticize.... But appreciate.

Always Red
04-30-2012, 09:41 PM
Well said, wheels. :thumbup:

Life sucks some of the time, but baseball is sanctuary.

Tommyjohn25
04-30-2012, 09:42 PM
I really didn't think post out all too well. Just thought it would be appropriate here. This were my main baseball friends are. Things like this are really why The Old Red Guard was created.

I just didn't think I'd be using it for this reason so soon.

I'm not ready for that/this part of my life to be over.

It's precious, and Baseball is a huge part of it. We can't forget that.

I'm with you, brother. For the past several years I have called my Dad after EVERY Reds win in additon to taking several in with him personally either at his house or the ballpark. There isn't a word strong enough to describe how much I dread the day I reach for my cell after a win and he isn't there to call anymore. Makes me tear up just typing that, actually.

That being said, try not to stress out too much about it until you find out what it is. I had a similar episode a few years back. It didn't last 8 months...maybe 2 1/2 months or so. I went to the Dr. and he couldn't figure it out either. Same symptoms it sounds like, it felt exactly like I was drunk ALL the time. It was difficlut to sleep, I had no appetite, and to be honest it frightened me to the point of a near nervous breakdown at one point. Then, one day at work at about 8 in the morning, it just went away. I could actually feel it just come to a stop just as suddenly as the onset. Never did figure out what it was, but it never came back and I have checked out healthy ever since.

Obviously I don't know the details of what your Dad is going through, but I do know that I spent almost 3 months worrying, losing sleep, and not eating due to nervousness and it ended up being, well, nothing I guess.

Keep your head up and be strong...and at the very least watch a game on tv with your old man.

Joseph
04-30-2012, 09:42 PM
As someone without their dad already, I can tell you its too soon no matter when it happens. I lost mine when he was but 46 and I was only 24. Way too early. We didn't get to do all the baseball games like you and yours have, so enjoy every chance you get. Take em, even if you have to roll your eyes at the situation once in a while. As the old saying goes, you only regret the things you didn't do.

Prayers to you and yours Wheels. We are here if you need us.

wheels
04-30-2012, 09:44 PM
As someone without their dad already, I can tell you its too soon no matter when it happens. I lost mine when he was but 46 and I was only 24. Way too early. We didn't get to do all the baseball games like you and yours have, so enjoy every chance you get. Take em, even if you have to roll your eyes at the situation once in a while. As the old saying goes, you only regret the things you didn't do.

Prayers to you and yours Wheels. We are here if you need us.

Thanks. I really do know it.

wheels
04-30-2012, 09:49 PM
I'm with you, brother. For the past several years I have called my Dad after EVERY Reds win in additon to taking several in with him personally either at his house or the ballpark. There isn't a word strong enough to describe how much I dread the day I reach for my cell after a win and he isn't there to call anymore. Makes me tear up just typing that, actually.

That being said, try not to stress out too much about it until you find out what it is. I had a similar episode a few years back. It didn't last 8 months...maybe 2 1/2 months or so. I went to the Dr. and he couldn't figure it out either. Same symptoms it sounds like, it felt exactly like I was drunk ALL the time. It was difficlut to sleep, I had no appetite, and to be honest it frightened me to the point of a near nervous breakdown at one point. Then, one day at work at about 8 in the morning, it just went away. I could actually feel it just come to a stop just as suddenly as the onset. Never did figure out what it was, but it never came back and I have checked out healthy ever since.

Obviously I don't know the details of what your Dad is going through, but I do know that I spent almost 3 months worrying, losing sleep, and not eating due to nervousness and it ended up being, well, nothing I guess.


Keep your head up and be strong...and at the very least watch a game on with your old man.

*deep breath*

Yup. Thing is, I really wish it was happening to ME instead of him. I'm not just saying that. I'd gladly rip those lesions off of his cerebellum and put them on mine. That's not hyperbole. That must mean I really care about the old cuss.

Tommyjohn25
04-30-2012, 09:54 PM
*deep breath*

Yup. Thing is, I really wish it was happening to ME instead of him. I'm not just saying that. I'd gladly rip those lesions off of his cerebellum and put them on mine. That's not hyperbole. That must mean I really care about the old cuss.

I hear ya. I would feel the same way if I were in your position. I will be sending positive thoughts your way, Wheels. I really will.

Keep us posted.

RANDY IN INDY
04-30-2012, 10:00 PM
I really didn't think that post out all too well. I dont really care, though. Just thought it would be appropriate here. This is were my main baseball friends are. Things like this are really why The Old Red Guard was created. I just wonder how many of us remember those early days.

I didn't think I'd be using it for this reason so soon, and maybe I'm jumping the proverbial gun. I HOPE I am.

I'm not ready for that/this part of my life to be over.

It's precious, and Baseball is a huge part of it. We can't forget that, and we simply cannot allow ourselves to not appreciate every season, every game we watch. Kvetch, whine, comment, criticize.... But appreciate.

The Old Red Guard is not what it used to be, but know that those of us who were here won't soon forget. Baseball is such a big part of my memories of my Dad, Grandfather, and Uncle who are now, all gone. Those memories of days spent at the ballpark, watching on TV, and listening beside the radio are ever present. Prayers go out to you and your family, my friend.

wheels
04-30-2012, 10:01 PM
The Old Red Guard is not what it used to be, but know that those of us who were here won't soon forget. Baseball is such a big part of my memories of my Dad, Grandfather, and Uncle who are now, all gone. Those memories of days spent at the ballpark, watching on TV, and listening beside the radio are ever present. Prayers go out to you and your family, my friend.

Yeah... Choked up again.

Thanks, Brother.

wheels
04-30-2012, 10:05 PM
As an aside....

I know the ORG has lost it's focus, and I'm just as much to blame as anyone else.

We could have done a better job crowding out the noise if we would just stuck to what we always did.

It was always a mix of good Baseball sense, with an intrinsic personal touch.

We lost that for a while, but I can see it's coming back.

Tommyjohn25
04-30-2012, 10:11 PM
As an aside....

I know the ORG has lost it's focus, and I'm just as much to blame as anyone else.

We could have done a better job crowding out the noise if we would just stuck to what we always did.

It was always a mix of good Baseball sense, with an intrinsic personal touch.

We lost that for a while, but I can see it's coming back.

I still think this place transforms back into it's old self when one of it's own really needs it to. Like this, for instance. Or when GAC and TRF needed it to, or when I was going through a tough point in my life in 2008 and needed support/advice. I got it here just as much, if not more, than anywhere else.

wheels
04-30-2012, 10:16 PM
I still think this place transforms back into it's old self when one of it's own really needs it to. Like this, for instance. Or when GAC and TRF needed it to, or when I was going through a tough point in my life in 2008 and needed support/advice. I got it here just as much, if not more, than anywhere else.

There really is no place like Redszone.

The old guy is still alive and well, much as we miss him.:(

cincrazy
04-30-2012, 10:30 PM
Wheels, I wish you the best. My dad had a scare with cancer last August. They found a mass on his lungs, and his doctor was sure it was cancer. Turns out, it wasn't. But during the two weeks I thought it was, I looked at my dad like I'd never looked at him before. He's my hero, and why I'm a baseball fan. I hope that you get good news. Just because it appears to be something serious, doesn't mean it is. And even IF it is, medical technology has come a long, long way. So keep your spirits high either way, my friend.

wheels
04-30-2012, 11:07 PM
Wheels, I wish you the best. My dad had a scare with cancer last August. They found a mass on his lungs, and his doctor was sure it was cancer. Turns out, it wasn't. But during the two weeks I thought it was, I looked at my dad like I'd never looked at him before. He's my hero, and why I'm a baseball fan. I hope that you get good news. Just because it appears to be something serious, doesn't mean it is. And even IF it is, medical technology has come a long, long way. So keep your spirits high either way, my friend.

I haven't thought much about what can happen if he's diagnosed. Don't know why. Maybe I'm being defeatist, but there is just too much evidence to support an impossible climb due to the location of these....things. But I'm clinging to the fact that it doesn't seem like they're what I think they are.

Hope springs eternal. Baseball teaches us about both hope and reality. Because of this grand game, I've got a grasp on the things that make life worth living.

Does that make sense?

dfs
04-30-2012, 11:16 PM
Sometimes I miss the ability to like a post.

My dad went several years ago. Thanks for bringing him back for just a couple seconds.

wheels
04-30-2012, 11:33 PM
Sometimes I miss the ability to like a post.

My dad went several years ago. Thanks for bringing him back for just a couple seconds.

I think we all go through the same shiyyyte. I guess it's a bit of cold comfort.

Virtual beers, and all of that.

VR
04-30-2012, 11:54 PM
Well done wheels, appreciate you sharing that.

I lost my dad in 1991 when I was 25.....way too young. He was a baseball purist that was born in 1921 and a lifelong Cardinals fan. He died in early October of 1991, a baseball fans favorite time of the year. We buried him on the day Leo Durocher died. (We never had to endure the hatred of being in the same division when he was alive.)

My youngest of 4 sons in ridiculously crazy about baseball....the first of my 4 boys to have it in his blood. I have great joy knowing how much fun he would have hearing his 10 year old grandson tell him why the Reds will own the Cards this year. (Yes, he's a good trash talker too).

Point of the story.....the memories are being written right now with the ones near and dear to us, and baseball has a way painting a masterpiece in our lives....while we usually aren't paying attention. Thanks for reminding us all of that wheels.

wheels
05-01-2012, 12:01 AM
VR,

You're one of the people I was hoping would respond. Thanks for that story. I'm glad you've got kids, and they've responded to your passion (at least one of them, anyway).

I hope I can get lucky enough to have someone to pass that kind of legacy to.

VR
05-01-2012, 12:18 AM
VR,

You're one of the people I was hoping would respond. Thanks for that story. I'm glad you've got kids, and they've responded to your passion (at least one of them, anyway).

I hope I can get lucky enough to have someone to pass that kind of legacy to.

My dad was diagnosed in 1986 with primary schlerosing cholangitis....a very rare liver disorder. He was given 1 year to leave, and made it 5. My 5 siblings and I agree....it may have been the best five years we had with our dad.

Funny about you taking them to a game. I took mine to a game in 1991 in Oakland coliseum. Our 3 tickets had 1 seat DIRECTLY behind the foul pole in right field. We made my mom sit in that seat....dad and I leaned out the entire game so we could see the whole field. It would have been miserable if I didn't realize it was probably the last game I would ever see with dad. I can still smell the beer and spicy bratwurst that we ordered.

Hope tomorrow goes well....we all look forward to hearing the good results.

wheels
05-01-2012, 12:54 AM
I think it's one of those "No News is Good News" deals.

Hopefully, he has a clean scan (I'm pretty sure of that) and we won't hear a word from the doctor until May 12. We need a break from doctors.

RANDY IN INDY
05-01-2012, 06:48 AM
I am more than lucky to be able to share my love of the game with my only son. We went to the Reds game on Sunday. Two hours together to and from Indy to Cincinnati and a Reds game with all the trimmings. He loves the Reds, plays high school and travel baseball, and I'm loving every minute. The time is precious. Sometimes I have to pinch myself. How did I get so lucky? Baseball is a common thread and it's such a blessing that he still likes to spend time with his Dad as a teenager. I don't want to take a minute of it for granted.

dabvu2498
05-01-2012, 08:09 AM
Best wishes for you and the family, wheels.

It's amazing how baseball ties all of us together. Last night my dad told me a great story about getting to watch the 1960 World Series with his father. There was sentiment in the story that my old man doesn't expose very often.

My boy is playing in his first "real" t-ball games this week. His "Grandpa B" will get to see him play for the first time Friday. That'll be a big moment for us two old dudes.

He's starting to understand how to watch the game a little bit now that he's playing. I love it when he asks me questions about why Brandon Phillips did this or why Joey Votto did that. I love it even more when he asks one of his grandpas though. Their answers are always better than mine.

redsmetz
05-01-2012, 08:21 AM
Thanks for sharing. It's been a week for me dealing with quite a number of deaths - seriously, five in all; ranging from age 60 up to nearly 94, different connections, etc. None were close folks, but people I had connections with. Makes for a very pensive week.

As many of you know, I lost my Mom last October, something we were well prepared for. Only had one good cry when I finally sat down to look at our old family movies that I had put on a DVD - seeing my Mom in various years in her early 30's and my late brother (who died 10 yrs. ago this year), plus my grandmothers and a host of aunts & uncles who aren't gone. But it was just the simple smiles and laughs of my Mom in the movies that touched. It's really what I miss most, those times when some funny story comes to me that I knew she'd enjoy, have a good laugh at; or just some good news (missing sharing with her the news that our son is engaged to a young woman my Mom adored; she went to the same grade school my Mom attended - they sang the school's alma mater together once), etc.

When my brother's cancer diagnosis came around the second time and he knew he wasn't going to beat it, we had lunch. He shared that he wanted our family to get together every month that he still had (there were 8 of us, 20 grandkids at the time) and we did. He vowed he'd play golf every month until he died and he nearly made - last time golfing was at Dave & Busters on New Years Day with his buddies holding up while he hit the ball. We have a photo at a family Reds game from then too.

My father-in-law died suddenly in December 2010, something again I shared here in a thread titled something like "Ode to a Baseball Fan". We had given him a couple of books written about old-time baseball players which he sat and read during the days we were there in Missouri after Christmas. Right away he wrote inside "Joe & Carol, Christmas 2010". The last baseball conversation he and I had was a comment about one of the books: "Joe, you remember old 'so & so'?". "No," I said. Whoever he was, he had been a pitcher, but Ted told me the guy said the toughest pitcher the guy had ever faced was "old Ewell Blackwell" and my father-in-law commented about his side-armed delivery. The pitcher said the toughest hitter he ever faced was my father-in-law's favorite, the great Stan Musial and I'm sure to this day that the only thing he's unhappy with about heaven (if that's possible) is that Stan's still down here and not up there to yack with him about baseball!

As my father-in-law said to some of us at lunch on the day he died, "None of us have figured out how to beat this deal" (which he shared after recounting how a buddy dropped dead while he was out with him, something that was going to happen to him half a day later.

Of course, this talk isn't to suggest things are or aren't dire for your dad. Who knows? The important thing as you know, and as others have shared, is to enjoy every moment you have, cherish those memories made. Our time, even with a long life, is short and there's no way around that. Enjoy it fully.

Sorry to be so wordy.

cumberlandreds
05-01-2012, 08:25 AM
My best to you Wheels. I sincerely hope everything turns out for the good for your dad and family.
Best thing to do is enjoy and appreciate every moment you have with your dad. My dad has been gone for over six years now and I still miss him and always will. We would always talk sports when I called him up. Mainly baseball and UK basketball. I miss that as much as anything. I still fondly recall the games he took me to and we attended together later as adults. Some of the best times of my life. I'll always remember the day in the mid 1980's he came into my room and said how about we go up to Cincinnati tomorrow and watch the Reds. Well he couldn't have given me a $1million and made me more happy. Those little things like make lasting memories.

klw
05-01-2012, 08:45 AM
I couldn't find the version they have used in the World Series but here is Bart Giamatti reading his essay "the Green Fields of the Mind". It seemed like it would fit here.


The Green Fields of the Mind - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uH2_dUboyBA)

Benihana
05-01-2012, 08:49 AM
Well said Wheels- enjoy every moment and take nothing for granted. Thoughts and prayers to you and your family.

George Anderson
05-01-2012, 09:31 AM
I am more than lucky to be able to share my love of the game with my only son. We went to the Reds game on Sunday. Two hours together to and from Indy to Cincinnati and a Reds game with all the trimmings. He loves the Reds, plays high school and travel baseball, and I'm loving every minute. The time is precious. Sometimes I have to pinch myself. How did I get so lucky? Baseball is a common thread and it's such a blessing that he still likes to spend time with his Dad as a teenager. I don't want to take a minute of it for granted.

I am not the sentimental type but I have a 5 year old playing and watching him play is a real highlight of my life. Besides he is a hell of a lot better than his dad was so that makes it funner.

Ghosts of 1990
05-01-2012, 09:43 AM
You are in my thoughts and prayers. Although my father is not a huge baseball fan and we are not bonded by baseball, we have some baseball memories through the years.

We coincidentally went Morel mushroom hunting last night. Dad ended up getting us lost in a huge boy scout woods and I had to call my wife to come pick us up. It was like a changing of the guard, me leading my father out of a woods. Something I never thought would happen. Ironically I stumbled onto this thread after getting home past 10 at night, hours after I had thought dad and I would be wrapped up.

No point to my post except to say I enjoyed yours Wheels and I made a memory with my dad although I don't think it was how I planned.

marcshoe
05-01-2012, 09:46 AM
Thanks for this.

Cedric
05-01-2012, 09:52 AM
Thanks for this wheels.

I'm taking my 6 month boy to his first game today so this hits perfectly today. Keep your spirits up.

elfmanvt07
05-01-2012, 09:54 AM
Post of the year.

My situation is different from yours, but I can easily sympathize.

Baseball to me has always been the one thing that my father and I can see eye to eye on. I'm still young, and relatively speaking, so is he. Being 26, I've only recently become cognizant of the mortality of my parents. Of course it was always a hypothetical, but the last year has made their fragility much more apparent.

My parents divorced when I was three, and I always thought of my father as the parent who saw me infrequently, but thought he had to get all of his corrections done in the limited amount of time we had. I associated my dad with getting chewed out. No matter the situation, I would shy away from spending time with him. There were rarely situations and circumstances that made me think otherwise.

Baseball always did. Baseball was the one thing that we shared consistently. It allowed me to forget about all the other times with him that I dreaded. I could feel at ease around my father when we talked baseball. It conjured memories in a pool on the 6th floor of some downtown Cincinnati hotel. Memories sitting in the green seats, asking my dad how someone as old as him (Ricky Henderson) could still possibly be playing baseball. Frosty malts, and chili cheese coneys, and ice cream helmet cups. Rob Dibble could throw a ball faster than I could imagine, and Chris Sabo made me feel better about wearing glasses. All those images, at a moments notice, could instantly erase any pensiveness or anger I feel toward my old man.

Baseball is a salve that heals all wounds.

RichRed
05-01-2012, 10:06 AM
I lost my dad about 4 1/2 years ago. We never saw a major league game together but one of my best memories is the two of us watching the single-A Asheville Tourists play a game in quaint little McCormick Park. He was the type of dad who would drop everything if my brother or I needed something. I miss him every day but I'm thankful for the time we had.

wheels, you're a good dude; I remember meeting you at the RedsZone gathering a few years ago. I'm sorry for the circumstances but it's good to see you posting on here and reminding us how great the ORG can be. All my best to you and your family.

Reds Fanatic
05-01-2012, 10:11 AM
Best of luck to you and your family Wheels.

I go to games (Reds, Bengals, Dragons) regularly with my Dad. He is getting older and I know the day is coming eventually when we won't be able to go to games together and I know how badly I will miss it when that time comes.

Your post reminded me of a great post Mo Egger put in his blog about losing his Dad who he regularly went to games with. I was able to find it and I wanted to post it again:

http://www.espn1530.com/pages/mo.html?article=8600548

Boss-Hog
05-01-2012, 10:43 AM
Best of luck, wheels. Thanks for the post.

MikeThierry
05-01-2012, 11:13 AM
Wheels, I'm sorry for what is happening to you. I wish you and your family luck through this tough time.

Ron Madden
05-01-2012, 02:02 PM
Wheels,

You and your family are in my thoughts and prayers. Hang in there my friend and enjoy your time with your father ya never know he might just beat this thing.

M2
05-01-2012, 03:54 PM
wheels, that was an ORG-worthy post. And I mean ORG the man, not the board. Great stuff.

Roy Tucker
05-01-2012, 04:17 PM
Having lost my dad I 1994 and my mom about a month ago, I can honestly say that a day doesn't go by when I don't think of them. But what I've found is that I'm the go-to guy now with the people in my life. And that's how I keep my folks alive in my heart. People ask me this or that and I quite often think "what would my dad do?" And that's probably the greatest tribute I can pay. I just hope my kids think of me that way some day.

klw
05-01-2012, 04:33 PM
Point is... Baseball is my sanctuary. It's easy to forget that. It's easy to take it for granted. This is not that kind of game, though. This is a thread that binds families (especially one as small as ours). Mom, narrowly missed being hit by a scorching Adam Dunn homer in 2006 out in the Sun Deck. Me, sheepishly standing next to Tom Lawless on picture day, glove in hand, one sock higher than the other. Dad, rushing home to tell me he just wrote Paul Oniell's dad's homeowners policy, and how can I forget him for plopping down those two tickets to Game Two. He couldn't go, but he was fine with me and my best friend driving down to that World Series game by ourselves at age 16.



Baseball is the one constant through all the years.

People will come - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZ1dZhh0_RQ)

wheels
05-01-2012, 04:57 PM
Thanks everyone.

The oncologist did say that he's never seen anything like this. I'm taking that in a positive way. Should I be?

RedlegJake
05-01-2012, 05:04 PM
wheels, my thoughts and prayers go with you - I lost my father a few years back. I have so many memories of him and so many involve baseball in some way. I think that's why I love baseball so much today - much more than I did when he was alive. I enjoyed baseball then, alright, but today I can feel his presence when I watch a game more than I can even visiting his grave, so I'm never alone when I catch a game. Dad is always right there. Baseball is the family game - it stretches across eras and is passed on orally, stories told of heroes from one generation to the next, built up story by story into a timeless mythos that transcends numbers and stats. My dad was a great storyteller - I enjoy his stories even now when I'm at a game, the only difference is I'm the only one who hears the telling.

wheels
05-01-2012, 05:05 PM
wheels, my thoughts and prayers go with you - I lost my father a few years back. I have so many memories of him and so many involve baseball in some way. I think that's why I love baseball so much today - much more than I did when he was alive. I enjoyed baseball then, alright, but today I can feel his presence when I watch a game more than I can even visiting his grave, so I'm never alone when I catch a game. Dad is always right there. Baseball is the family game - it stretches across eras and is passed on orally, stories told of heroes from one generation to the next, built up story by story into a timeless mythos that transcends numbers and stats. My dad was a great storyteller - I enjoy his stories even now when I'm at a game, the only difference is I'm the only one who hears the telling.

I was hoping you'd read this thread.

RANDY IN INDY
05-01-2012, 05:39 PM
wheels, my thoughts and prayers go with you - I lost my father a few years back. I have so many memories of him and so many involve baseball in some way. I think that's why I love baseball so much today - much more than I did when he was alive. I enjoyed baseball then, alright, but today I can feel his presence when I watch a game more than I can even visiting his grave, so I'm never alone when I catch a game. Dad is always right there. Baseball is the family game - it stretches across eras and is passed on orally, stories told of heroes from one generation to the next, built up story by story into a timeless mythos that transcends numbers and stats. My dad was a great storyteller - I enjoy his stories even now when I'm at a game, the only difference is I'm the only one who hears the telling.

Hope you pass those stories on to the folks that matter in your life. Your father will live on through the stories.

pedro
05-01-2012, 05:58 PM
Wheels, hope the best for you and your family.

Go Reds!

*BaseClogger*
05-02-2012, 05:02 AM
I'm sorry I didn't see this thread earlier, Wheels. It's threads like these that keep me coming back to this place.

I had to share this with a few friends. Sometimes I think us young people take our parents for granted. Sometimes I find myself not returning Dad's calls because I don't want to give up those 30 minutes--too caught up with living in the moment. I'm really glad I called him tonight. Whenever our conversation stalls we turn to baseball as a common ground.

I hope the best for you and look forward to discussing more Reds baseball with you in the future! :thumbup:

WebScorpion
05-05-2012, 02:43 AM
Thanks for the post Wheels, it's kind of timely for me. I lost both my parents within 2 months a little over 6 years ago now. For a time I found myself cherishing every moment with my kids...you know, really being present in the moment and paying attention. This winter I seem to have been getting caught up in the massively important goings on at work and even thinking about those things while I'm with the family. Your post is my reminder that I told myself I'd stop doing that.

My big baseball connection was with my grandpa who spent his life driving a truck for Richter concrete and using his alternative curse words (he had a 'clean' alternative for just about any curse you could think of) to fuss about what Bristol or Sparky was doing at any given moment. His constant companion was a little pocket transistor radio with a single earpiece attached and he was always listening to the Reds game. People would see him on the street and ask what the score was, or he'd randomly yell out, "Goldernit Pete! What are you thinking?" or sometimes just a little encouraging, "You can do it boys!" I always imagined people would think he was half crazy but that seemed to be normal behavior for his generation. He was always baseball crazy...he showed up at every knothole game for me and my brothers and half of our practices...he played on a softball team until he couldn't, and even then he became their manager. He had season tickets at Crosley, and then later at Riverfront, and my brothers and I got to take turns going to games with him. I saw half a dozen playoff games with him and a couple World Series games and we made so many memories I could darn near write a book. His generation didn't know how to talk about their feelings, but they knew how to be present. He was a constant presence in my life until he passed away in the 90's and I buried a ball with him that he had 'Robbie' sign for me back in '65. He taught me many, many things by his living example but whenever he verbalized a life lesson, ("Sometimes you don't win, but you can learn a lot from a loss.") it was always related to baseball. Anyway, I think I'll go tell my kids a story about their great grandfather now and I want to thank you for bringing me back to reality. When the girls ask who "Wheels" is that we're praying for tonight, I'll tell them he's a big Reds fan like their Daddy and their Great Grandpa.

God bless you brother. :)

Tommyjohn25
05-05-2012, 10:50 PM
Wheels, I was just discussing you and your Dad with Mrs. Tommyjohn25, who is a Dr. She has a thought and maybe you can bring it up to your oncologist. If he is truly confused about what the legions are, perhaps they are parasites? She said that in some cases, if one finds themselves with parasites for whatever reason, they will oftentimes run a cycle in the brain and can present themselves on a MRI or CT scan as several anomalies.

Just a thought. Hope all is well.

WVRedsFan
05-05-2012, 11:37 PM
Just a little story. What wheels said can apply to most of us. My Dad took me to my first game at Crosley Field in 1961. We did it each year until 1973 when he had his first heart attack in April of that year. We had a trip planned that summer, but another attack in May made us miss our first season in 12 years. During that time, we sat by the radio together and listened to the games. He was better in 1975 and we resumed our trips to Cincy for the next 4 years. In 1981' we had plans to take the Amtrack to a game in late September. We ordered the tickets one day before he died. I cherish the memories of those 16 years of going to games.

My father never knew his grandson, born in 1986, but I continued that tradition with him. I hope that he will take me to games when I become a PITA, because the memories he will have will last forever, just like mine have. Baseball and the Reds have been a large part of my family, and I hope he follows suit when he has children.

Prayers your way...

wheels
05-10-2012, 08:52 PM
Wow... More great stories from people I've grown to love from this site.

I can't tell you how much it means. We share so many experiences' and so many people have offered up words of encouragement and ideas about what it could be.... I'm genuinely shocked and a little choked up about it. I really can't thank you all enough.

My Dad and I visited the oncologist today, and he told us that all of the scan and blood tests showed absolutely nothing. He's still as confused as he was last week, but he stopped short of saying it wasn't cancer. Needless to say I'm bouyed by the news. Nothing is certain, but he seemed confident that they could reach the spots on his brain for a biopsy. He also acknowledged that most people wouldn't still be alive if this were a metastatic cancer left untreated. Yeah. I'm pretty stoked. Whatever it is, if it isn't cancer we can deal with it. I told him today that I'd buy him a kick butt Evil Kneavel style cane. Who cares? As long as he's alive and being offensive.

I'd also like to convey my gratitude to the Reds organization. A somewhat prolific poster here (who will be forever nameless! Don't ask.) offered us tickets to any game in a location that will be easy for my pop to traverse. I told him about this, and it's the closest I've ever seen him come to crying.

Sigh... We really are rooting for a class ball club... Almost as classy as th e folks in the ORG.

We really should feel good about ourselves and the tea we root for. They DEFINITELY reflect our values. We really are family.

marcshoe
05-10-2012, 09:57 PM
Good news. I know it will still be scary, but this is good news.

My father was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer a couple of years ago. They called the family in and gave him pretty much no chance. He's still around, and they can find no cancer. He'll always be stage 4 and realizes nothing is certain, but with no evident cancer, he's been able to get on with his life, even to travel and ride his Harley again (even if it is a trike now).

With it looking like your father's problem likely wasn't cancer, I can imagine the relief. Good to hear this.

Tommyjohn25
05-10-2012, 10:39 PM
Great news, Wheels! Also whoever the nameless poster on here is, good on ya!

WVRedsFan
05-10-2012, 10:56 PM
Great news. Take your father to a game and cherish the time you have with him. I can't take my Dad to a game anymore. And I'd like to sit in the ball park he never saw and hear what he'd say about it. I can only wonder what he'd say about our manager. He would probably fire him like he did Hutch, Sisler, and Sparky among others. I miss him terribly.

kaldaniels
05-10-2012, 10:59 PM
Great news wheels! I got around to this thread a little late but I echo the sentiments already sent your way. We're all pulling for you guys!

wheels
05-11-2012, 12:01 AM
Thanks everyone.

It's been a very long and stressful day. Beer has never tasted this good.

Johnny Footstool
05-11-2012, 12:43 AM
I'm extremely happy for you and your dad, wheels.

Do the doctors have any ideas about what the next step is? Have they suggested a cardiogram? If not, you should ask about it.

cumberlandreds
05-11-2012, 07:51 AM
Sounds like good news Wheels! I'm glad to hear it.

RANDY IN INDY
05-11-2012, 07:53 AM
Keep thinking the positive thoughts, wheels! Sounds like good news!

wheels
05-11-2012, 09:11 AM
I'm extremely happy for you and your dad, wheels.

Do the doctors have any ideas about what the next step is? Have they suggested a cardiogram? If not, you should ask about it.

He's on to a neurologist, and I'm going to suggest that. They're going to want to biopsy it, but I'm not sure how, or if they have some other things planned first. I guess some people just have spots on the brain for lots of various reasons, and it may not be what's causing his symptoms.

wheels
09-16-2012, 05:50 PM
I just wanted to bump this thread up to let some folks know how things are going.

After numerous visits to the neurologist, all the tests have come back negative. Meanwhile, he's been seeing an acupuncturist that has been treating him for inner ear disorder (which is the only diagnosis that has been proven positive). He's been feeling less dizzy, but he still can't walk well. His balance is awful, and he's embarrassed to be seen in public. That means I still can't take him to a game, regardless of the Reds' amazingly generous offer.

I'm still very happy that it doesn't look like anything life threatening, and I'm even more proud of the team my father and I root for.

They're good people. They're family as far as I'm concerned.

RANDY IN INDY
09-16-2012, 06:11 PM
I just wanted to bump this thread up to let some folks know how things are going.

After numerous visits to the neurologist, all the tests have come back negative. Meanwhile, he's been seeing an acupuncturist that has been treating him for inner ear disorder (which is the only diagnosis that has been proven positive). He's been feeling less dizzy, but he still can't walk well. His balance is awful, and he's embarrassed to be seen in public. That means I still can't take him to a game, regardless of the Reds' amazingly generous offer.

I'm still very happy that it doesn't look like anything life threatening, and I'm even more proud of the team my father and I root for.

They're good people. They're family as far as I'm concerned.

:beerme:
Great news, wheels!

cincrazy
09-16-2012, 06:12 PM
I just wanted to bump this thread up to let some folks know how things are going.

After numerous visits to the neurologist, all the tests have come back negative. Meanwhile, he's been seeing an acupuncturist that has been treating him for inner ear disorder (which is the only diagnosis that has been proven positive). He's been feeling less dizzy, but he still can't walk well. His balance is awful, and he's embarrassed to be seen in public. That means I still can't take him to a game, regardless of the Reds' amazingly generous offer.

I'm still very happy that it doesn't look like anything life threatening, and I'm even more proud of the team my father and I root for.

They're good people. They're family as far as I'm concerned.

My prayers are with you. I just recovered from two months of dizziness and balance problems. I haven't been to a Reds game since April because of it, and I normally go to 12-14 games a year.

I wasn't able to work for almost a month, I was afraid to go anywhere publicly, and the anxiety it caused was off the charts. I hope he remains positive and takes it one day at a time.

I know how frustrating it is going back and forth to several doctors and having them say "Well, we're not really sure... but it's probably this." Nothing is more frustrating than hearing time and again that you're fine, when you know you're not. I believe my cause was inner ear... still don't know that for a fact. It could be gone forever. Or it could come back tomorrow. Extremely frustrating, and crippling when you're in the midst of it.

wheels
09-16-2012, 06:59 PM
My prayers are with you. I just recovered from two months of dizziness and balance problems. I haven't been to a Reds game since April because of it, and I normally go to 12-14 games a year.

I wasn't able to work for almost a month, I was afraid to go anywhere publicly, and the anxiety it caused was off the charts. I hope he remains positive and takes it one day at a time.

I know how frustrating it is going back and forth to several doctors and having them say "Well, we're not really sure... but it's probably this." Nothing is more frustrating than hearing time and again that you're fine, when you know you're not. I believe my cause was inner ear... still don't know that for a fact. It could be gone forever. Or it could come back tomorrow. Extremely frustrating, and crippling when you're in the midst of it.

I really hate seeing the disrepair in the garage and yard. I was there this morning for some weed maintenance, and it was sobering.

I just hope things keep improving. I doubt it's going to get worse,and I'm glad he feels fine unless he's walking. Baby steps, I guess.

gilpdawg
09-16-2012, 11:51 PM
Glad it isn't more serious. As long as he keeps making slow progress don't get discouraged. The human body is amazingly resilient.

WebScorpion
09-17-2012, 01:39 AM
Thanks for the update Wheels. Although the situation still sucks, it sounds like it's not the worst of the alternatives. Keep your chin up and hopefully it will be one of those things that passes in its own time. We'll keep you both in our prayers. :)