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chicoruiz
06-11-2012, 08:53 AM
Reds:

Jimmy Stewart (73) –Played every position but pitcher in his career. Later an advance scout for the Reds and Phillies.

Frank Thomas (83) – A Red in 1959. Played for two of the worst teams in history- the ’52 Pirates and the ’62 Mets- and with a total of seven teams that lost at least 100 games. Nicknamed “The Big Donkey” because of his contrary ways; he played with a young Dick Allen in Philly, and as you’d expect they got along like a cobra and a mongoose. His disposition must not bother his wife; they’ve been married for 60 years.

Others:

Jose Reyes (29) –Timed in 8.72 seconds from first to third…Founder of his own record label, EL7 Records, for whom he’s recorded several reggae songs, including the heartbreaking “Bate Roto” (“Broken Bat”).

Odalis Perez (34) –The first pitcher in baseball history to be credited with a postseason win before he had a regular season win. Three others have done it since.

Dave Cash (64) –Had the unenviable task of replacing Bill Mazeroski at second base for the Pirates…Was a part of Pittsburgh’s groundbreaking all-black lineup in 1971...Since they were active at the same time, it would have been nice if he and Don Money could have been a DP combination...

Ernie Nevers –Pitched a few years for the Browns, but is better known as one of the greatest football players of all time, both at Stanford and in the NFL…Once scored 40 points in an NFL game, still a record…Also played professional basketball…At age 40 he enlisted in the Marines and volunteered for combat duty. He was sent to the South Pacific, where his unit got separated and was reported missing in action for months. When they were rescued, a number of them had died and Nevers had shrunk from his normal 205 pounds to 110.

Charlie Hollocher –A good shortstop for the Cubs whose career was derailed by persistent abdominal pain. The pain was so intense that he quit the game and eventually took his own life. Some have suggested that the pain was psychosomatic, but I don’t have enough faith in 1920s medicine to say anything like that.

Roger Bresnahan –First catcher to be inducted into the Hall Of Fame. Sportswriters nicknamed him the “Duke of Tralee” because he claimed to be from Tralee, Ireland; actually he was from the somewhat more prosaic town of Toledo, Ohio. He’s also sometime given credit for inventing shin guards, although they were in use in the Negro Leagues before Roger adopted them.

Bob Borkowski
06-11-2013, 11:33 PM
Adding Clarence Woods - At the age of 22 he pitched 2 innings for the Indianapolis Hoosiers of the Federal League in 1914. The Federal League was considered part of the major leagues at that time. In his 2 innings Woods allowed 1 run (earned), 1 hit, 2 walks and 1 strikeout.

I see that among his teammates were Bill McKechnie (future Reds manager) and Edd Roush who would be elected to the Hall of Fame.

These 2 innings thrown by Woods were his only stats recorded as a major leaguer and, following his release, I suppose he just returned home. Not really sure.

What makes Clarence Woods' case special for me is that he was born and raised in the same little county of southeastern Indiana as I was and I actually knew him. He died at age 77 in 1969. He was an insurance agent and was well known in town. My dad used to tell me that Clarence (6'5" and 230 lbs.) had a great fast ball but he really didn't know where the ball was going. We've all heard that story before and it usually doesn't have a very happy ending and it didn't in this case.

Now, all of these years later, I stand in awe of the fact that I knew an actual major leaguer. Never mind the fact that he wasn't really successful...he played in the major leagues! As a kid I dreamed of being with the Reds. I would throw a ball against walls or foundations of buildings hour after hour, fielding it as if it had been a batted ball and playing out a complete game of Reds vs. Somebody. The Reds usually came out on top in those games somehow. It was my dream to be a big leaguer. I didn't do it but he did!

Rest in Peace, Clarence Woods.

mth123
06-12-2013, 03:33 AM
Adding Clarence Woods - At the age of 22 he pitched 2 innings for the Indianapolis Hoosiers of the Federal League in 1914. The Federal League was considered part of the major leagues at that time. In his 2 innings Woods allowed 1 run (earned), 1 hit, 2 walks and 1 strikeout.

I see that among his teammates were Bill McKechnie (future Reds manager) and Edd Roush who would be elected to the Hall of Fame.

These 2 innings thrown by Woods were his only stats recorded as a major leaguer and, following his release, I suppose he just returned home. Not really sure.

What makes Clarence Woods' case special for me is that he was born and raised in the same little county of southeastern Indiana as I was and I actually knew him. He died at age 77 in 1969. He was an insurance agent and was well known in town. My dad used to tell me that Clarence (6'5" and 230 lbs.) had a great fast ball but he really didn't know where the ball was going. We've all heard that story before and it usually doesn't have a very happy ending and it didn't in this case.

Now, all of these years later, I stand in awe of the fact that I knew an actual major leaguer. Never mind the fact that he wasn't really successful...he played in the major leagues! As a kid I dreamed of being with the Reds. I would throw a ball against walls or foundations of buildings hour after hour, fielding it as if it had been a batted ball and playing out a complete game of Reds vs. Somebody. The Reds usually came out on top in those games somehow. It was my dream to be a big leaguer. I didn't do it but he did!

Rest in Peace, Clarence Woods.

Nice story Bob. Thanks for keeping these threads alive. I know they aren't for everybody, but I enjoyed them the first time around and love the little additions.