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Redsfan320
06-27-2012, 01:32 PM
Hey RZ, I'll be starting at MU this fall (Aug. 20 actually) at sixteen years old. I've lived in Oxford my whole life, and will continue to live at home during college, at least to start out, due to cost reasons. I'll be majoring in Psychology technically, but that's just something to put on the paperwork, while in actuality I'll just be taking core classes (Eng., His., etc.) my first year, than transferring to the Business School and majoring in Management and Leadership, with the eventual career goal of being involved in police-work. I also plan to minor in Criminology, and will be taking a prerequisite Sociology course this fall to get into that.

So... any tips about college generally or Miami specifically?

320

top6
06-27-2012, 01:47 PM
First of all, congratulations.

Second of all, I do not know your financial situation, and this may be impossible if you will have loans and need to work soon, but if at all possible I would try to take as many different classes in as many different areas as you can, at least at first. You may think you know what you want to do, but you could be wrong, and there may be something you love if you just try it. Same goes with clubs, activities, etc. The whole point of college should be to try new things, and hopefully eventually you find that one thing that you love doing and that you can do for a living. Worst case scenario you meet more people and start forming friendships that will probably last the rest of your life. And you can still do all that while following your current goals, but just keep an open mind and be willing and ready to try new experiences.

Good luck. (This advice was worth what you paid for it.)

westofyou
06-27-2012, 02:08 PM
So... any tips about college generally or Miami specifically?

320

Peabody Hall is haunted, watch out for ghosts

Johnny Footstool
06-27-2012, 02:12 PM
If you're starting college at 16, it's good that you live at home. On-campus life is pretty crazy for freshmen.

BuckeyeRed27
06-27-2012, 02:18 PM
If you're starting college at 16, it's good that you live at home. On-campus life is pretty crazy for freshmen.

I tend to agree. How is it that you are starting college so young 320?

My only advice is to get involved in clubs and on campus activities. This will be even more important if you aren't in the dorms. There is a lot more to college than the class room (which is very important too), and you don't want to miss that aspect of it.

Homer Bailey
06-27-2012, 03:38 PM
I'll respond more later, but use online websites such as ratemyprofessor.com and the Miami grade system to look up the teachers that give the easiest grades. Sounds like it is shortcutting, but for "Miami Plan" classes, it makes very little difference who your teacher is as far as experiences go, but the grade discrepancies can be HUGE.

reds44
06-27-2012, 03:54 PM
Go to parties. Get drunk. Meet girls.

#badinfluence

Redsfaithful
06-27-2012, 05:22 PM
Go to parties. Get drunk. Meet girls.

#badinfluence

I'd normally second this, but at 16, probably not quite as much.

Are you done with high school? My recommendation would be to do something else for 2 years (if you were my son I'd be pushing you to start a business, you could also travel, work all sorts of jobs you won't be able to work later in life, etc.) and start college when you're 18 and have a traditional experience, especially since you're wanting to go into a field where there's really no rush.

1) Police work isn't going anywhere
2) You're not going to make much money for a long time
3) Your youth is likely to actively work against you in that field

Finally, don't go into debt for a degree, especially when you're wanting to go into the public sector.

Redsfan320
06-27-2012, 05:28 PM
Thanks for all the replies so far... will try to answer some questions and also address Redsfaithful's post later this evening.

320

Johnny Footstool
06-27-2012, 06:46 PM
First of all, congratulations.

Second of all, I do not know your financial situation, and this may be impossible if you will have loans and need to work soon, but if at all possible I would try to take as many different classes in as many different areas as you can, at least at first. You may think you know what you want to do, but you could be wrong, and there may be something you love if you just try it. Same goes with clubs, activities, etc. The whole point of college should be to try new things, and hopefully eventually you find that one thing that you love doing and that you can do for a living. Worst case scenario you meet more people and start forming friendships that will probably last the rest of your life. And you can still do all that while following your current goals, but just keep an open mind and be willing and ready to try new experiences.

Good luck. (This advice was worth what you paid for it.)

For the first semester, especially being 16 years old, I'd say take 12 hours -- just enough to be a full-time student. Don't push it -- give yourself a chance to get used to the environment, the pace, the rhythms of college life. Learn good time management skills. This will help a lot at the end of the semester when papers are due and finals start piling up.

*BaseClogger*
06-27-2012, 10:30 PM
I'll respond more later, but use online websites such as ratemyprofessor.com and the Miami grade system to look up the teachers that give the easiest grades. Sounds like it is shortcutting, but for "Miami Plan" classes, it makes very little difference who your teacher is as far as experiences go, but the grade discrepancies can be HUGE.

I'll try to come up with some of my own original thoughts, but YES to this ^^^

I know they updated BlackBoard, but go to the MyMiami portal and search "grade distribution". The first link should be a PDF file with all of the grades given out in every class the previous semester. Ratemyprofessor is nice, but it can get skewed by a couple of bad apples who didn't deserve to be in that class in the first place. I always placed more trust in the average GPAs myself...

*BaseClogger*
06-27-2012, 10:39 PM
Okay, it didn't take long, but I thought of a few more things.

*Take the storytelling class. Most entertaining class at I took at Miami. I would tell you to wait until senior year, but I'm not sure the professor who "teaches" the course is going to last that much longer.

*Take advantage of KNH classes, especially Individual Exercise. You go to the gym, sign in, and get two credits.

*Take advantage of the career services office. I can't say enough about how much they did for me in helping me find a job. Most students at other schools would be envious if they knew how great of a resource it is. Sign up for some of the training seminars, do mock interviews, and heck, sign up for lots of interviews on CareerLINK. Even if you don't get the call back at least you gained valuable experience :)

top6
06-27-2012, 10:41 PM
For the first semester, especially being 16 years old, I'd say take 12 hours -- just enough to be a full-time student. Don't push it -- give yourself a chance to get used to the environment, the pace, the rhythms of college life. Learn good time management skills. This will help a lot at the end of the semester when papers are due and finals start piling up.

Reading my advice, I realize it seems like I was saying take as many classes as possible. But I didn't really mean that--what I meant is take some classes in different areas and don't necessarily limit yourself. I agree it is stupid to take so many classes you are overwhelmed--especially at first and especially if you are 16.

Redsfan320
06-27-2012, 11:30 PM
Alright guys, thanks for all replies and suggestions. As for how I'm in college at sixteen, I was home schooled, and started preschool a year early (started reading at three), and also kinda skipped second grade (did some over one summer). This puts me two years ahead, and here I am. I just had orientation this Monday and Tuesday, so I'm all signed up for classes. Unfortunately, I got into a late orientation session, so I didn't really have much choice as far as professors/time slots. Fortunately, I got all the classes I need.
Classes:
MTH 123 (Precalculus)... didn't do quite well enough on the placement test to get into Calc I, which I will need to take second semester now to get into the Business School.
ENG 111 (Freshman English)... basically everyone has to take it
SOC 153 (Sociology in a Global Context)... This is what I ended up with for an elective, and it was a prerequisite for the Criminology minor, so it will help later on.
PHY 101 (Physics and Society)... what I ended up in for Nat. Sci. Not my first choice.
HST 197 (World History up to 1500)... Not my first choice or anything close, but it knocks out four different Global Plan requirements, so that's nice.
All of them three hours each, so fifteen hours total.

Redsfaithful, I'm going to MU, so your advice about not going, while certainly interesting, doesn't really apply at this point. As to police work, quite frankly, its what I want to do. However, that's why I'm gunning for a Business degree; its a broad degree from one of the best business schools in the country, in case police doesn't work out.

Once again, thanks for all the replies, keep 'em coming!

320

Redsfan320
06-27-2012, 11:31 PM
Double Post of Dooming Dreadful Death. Do carry on... delicately.

320

medford
06-28-2012, 12:56 PM
16? wow, congrats.

First, I'll start this by saying, if you want to get into trouble, it will be easy, you can find it anywhere, but at 16, you may be a fish out of water so to speak. Most frosh are to begin with, then throw on your younger age, plus your a commuter, so you're going to be different than the normal student. Its neither good nor bad, per say, just different. I'd recommend limiting the amount of partying you do (if that's your thing). I'll assume your fairly responsible, and it sounds like you have your future pretty well thought out, so this is likely not an issue. I've seen more than 1 frosh drop out of college after 2 semesters of partying hard, and spending little time in the classroom. Its easy to get distracted in college by the social scene that may or may not have been different than what your used to.

With that said, you've got 15 hours, so plan on 15 hours of studying a week (which depending on the classes may be way more than you need or not enough) that's 30 hours of your week chaulked up. I'll agree with others about getting involved in clubs or something on campus. I wish I had done that more, its a great way to meet people with similar interests. However your still going to have free time.

My advice, is to get down to the career services and see if they have any sort of connections to local companies that could use 10-20 hours a week of help in something related to your field. Or even if its not in your field, there is usually a lot of student jobs around campus, some that require little more than answering a phone and allow you to study b/w calls. Point is, get work experience that you can add to your resume. Even better if its in your field. Even if its for minimum wage, or no money at all, that experience will put you a step ahead of other people in your field 2-3-4 years down the line.

Depending on your financial situation, given your age, I'd recommend to take things a little slower, 5 or 6 years, but as many internships or field related work experience as you can get. I'd look into the study abroad program, and start planning now to spend a semester taking classes in another country, preferrably somewhere where their language (I'm thinking spain) could be advantage to your potential law enforcment carreer.

good luck, enjoy.

Johnny Footstool
06-28-2012, 01:22 PM
Reading my advice, I realize it seems like I was saying take as many classes as possible. But I didn't really mean that--what I meant is take some classes in different areas and don't necessarily limit yourself. I agree it is stupid to take so many classes you are overwhelmed--especially at first and especially if you are 16.

Oh, yeah, I understood what you were saying, and I agree with it. I was just trying to add a bit of perspective -- try a variety of classes, but start off slowly.

*BaseClogger*
06-30-2012, 01:32 AM
My advice, is to get down to the career services and see if they have any sort of connections to local companies that could use 10-20 hours a week of help in something related to your field. Or even if its not in your field, there is usually a lot of student jobs around campus, some that require little more than answering a phone and allow you to study b/w calls. Point is, get work experience that you can add to your resume. Even better if its in your field. Even if its for minimum wage, or no money at all, that experience will put you a step ahead of other people in your field 2-3-4 years down the line.

Depending on your financial situation, given your age, I'd recommend to take things a little slower, 5 or 6 years, but as many internships or field related work experience as you can get. I'd look into the study abroad program, and start planning now to spend a semester taking classes in another country, preferrably somewhere where their language (I'm thinking spain) could be advantage to your potential law enforcment carreer.

Wow, I'm really disappointed I forgot about these two things.

It might be tough to get a career-related job as a 16 year-old, but a job is a great idea. You'll earn some spending money and learn lots of great lessons about responsibility and hard work.

I can't say enough about study abroad. Considering your age and flexibility, I would consider it a must...

*BaseClogger*
06-30-2012, 01:34 AM
PHY 101 (Physics and Society)... what I ended up in for Nat. Sci. Not my first choice.
HST 197 (World History up to 1500)... Not my first choice or anything close, but it knocks out four different Global Plan requirements, so that's nice.
All of them three hours each, so fifteen hours total.

Ouch, those are rough.

Do you like physics/history? If not, are there any openings in a GLG or GEO course? I wouldn't worry too much about those international requirements now if you are considering a study abroad...

Redsfan320
06-30-2012, 09:08 PM
Thanks for the replies once again. Medford, I'm really not the hard-partying type. I also definitely plan on getting out in four years, if at all possible. Regarding studying abroad, I really have no desire to that right now, but as most people do it in their second or third year, there's no reason its definitely off the table. BC, I did the best I could with class choices, and that's what I ended up with. Why do you say they're rough? Have you had them? Are they particularly difficult or just boring?

320

Raisor
06-30-2012, 10:49 PM
try out for the football team, they could use the help.

Superdude
07-01-2012, 02:20 AM
Redsfaithful, I'm going to MU, so your advice about not going, while certainly interesting, doesn't really apply at this point. As to police work, quite frankly, its what I want to do. However, that's why I'm gunning for a Business degree; its a broad degree from one of the best business schools in the country, in case police doesn't work out.

Is the bachelors going to benefit the police career? Seems like an awful steep price to pay as a back up plan. Especially considering the "once in a lifetime" social aspect of college will very likely be lost on a fresh faced sixteen year old commuter like yourself (no offense). College tuition is an investment like anything else, so make sure it's gonna pay off.

medford
07-01-2012, 03:32 PM
Thanks for the replies once again. Medford, I'm really not the hard-partying type. I also definitely plan on getting out in four years, if at all possible. Regarding studying abroad, I really have no desire to that right now, but as most people do it in their second or third year, there's no reason its definitely off the table. BC, I did the best I could with class choices, and that's what I ended up with. Why do you say they're rough? Have you had them? Are they particularly difficult or just boring?

320

I'd look at a Study Abroad program as a chance to learn a 2nd language, than the actual experience of seeing a foriegn country. I'm sure many law enforncement agencies could use somone that speaks spanish, which is why I suggested spain. At many schools, they'll set you up with a host family which would really give you the full emersion experience.

As far as a minor in business not helping a law enforcement degree, first I'd say it can't hurt, and secondly it might help greatly. The FBI and secret service certainly have many people employeed with business degrees. They need people that understand balance sheets and can spot fraudulant activities in business. It may even be an area of law enforcement that you enjoy over "chase down the bad guys" aspect that's often played out in the movies/tv.

SunDeck
07-01-2012, 04:32 PM
Can't say much about your chosen fields, except to say that I'd recommend hitting your sciences and math hard. You may change your mind someday and having a strong foundation in those fields can take you in many directions.

I'll also recommend studying abroad. It changed my life to be in a foreign country for a good chunk of a year. And it's not the kind of opportunity that comes up in your forties, so do it now.

Let college affect you- be open minded, seek out new and interesting clubs and do things you wouldn't otherwise do. Class is only part of college.

*BaseClogger*
07-01-2012, 05:52 PM
Thanks for the replies once again. Medford, I'm really not the hard-partying type. I also definitely plan on getting out in four years, if at all possible. Regarding studying abroad, I really have no desire to that right now, but as most people do it in their second or third year, there's no reason its definitely off the table. BC, I did the best I could with class choices, and that's what I ended up with. Why do you say they're rough? Have you had them? Are they particularly difficult or just boring?

Studying abroad is as much about (if not more) gaining the life experiences it brings with it as it is about anything education related.

As for those classes, I know some people who have, and they're just really dry and require more work than others. Few Miami Plan courses are difficult, so I'm sure if you put in the studying you'll do just fine. I'd just recommend an easier, more interesting route... :)

RichRed
07-02-2012, 03:31 PM
I'll also recommend studying abroad. It changed my life to be in a foreign country for a good chunk of a year. And it's not the kind of opportunity that comes up in your forties, so do it now.


I wish I'd done this. One of the few regrets I have about my college experience is that I didn't take advantage of a study abroad program.

oneupper
07-03-2012, 09:57 AM
I'd like to second the recommendation of a study abroad program, especially for a commuter student like 320, who'll be living at home. My daughter went to France last year for a month and it really helped her confidence/independence. So this year she had no trouble going backpacking through the UK with a friend.
It can be expensive. Start saving up so you can go maybe Junior year.

Homer Bailey
07-03-2012, 11:22 AM
Even though you've already scheduled classes, you can change them. And I would suggest checking the class listing every single day until you find the time slot, teacher, and class that you want. Seriously, it'll be worth it. I don't remember exactly how to do that as its surely been changed, and its been several years for me.

As far as your comment that "it's what you want to do." That may very well be the case at age 16, that you believe in your heart of hearts that is what you want to do. At age 16, I was positive I was going to be a prosecuting attorney. Two internships with law firms and I was 100% positive I did not want to be a lawyer. You may think you know what you want to do, but until you experience the real world, you really don't know what you want to do yet. So my suggestion would not be to abandon your current plans, but be open to other opportunities that may present themselves.

Please hit me up with any specific questions you have. Baseclogger is a great resource as well, and is much less removed from the Miami experience than me.

Homer Bailey
07-03-2012, 11:22 AM
DP

Cant Touch This
07-11-2012, 09:50 PM
Join the Glee Club. Seriously.

Redsfan320
07-17-2012, 12:19 PM
Anybody ever done any of the ROTCs at Miami? Or anywhere for that matter?

320