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Blitz Dorsey
07-09-2012, 06:04 PM
Interesting. The max Pittsburgh can offer without losing a 2013 first-round pick is $3.84 million. They aren't going to offer a penny more than that. Appel is being repped by Boras and it sounds like he might return to Stanford for his senior season. Or perhaps that's just posturing. Almost $4 mil is a lot to turn down. But Appel is probably salty he wasn't the #1 overall pick (or even close) as projected:

http://www.mlbtraderumors.com/2012/07/latest-on-pirates-mark-appel.html

For comparison's sake, Reds' first-rounder Nick Travieso (14th overall pick) signed for exactly $2 million.

RedlegJake
07-09-2012, 06:08 PM
I would not up that offer a penney either. Good place to be for the Pirates. If they don't get Appel with this year's team playing so well they'll get his pick again next year, so they'd have a high 1 and a lower 1. Can't really lose that scenario.

camisadelgolf
07-09-2012, 06:53 PM
http://www.baseballamerica.com/today/prospects/ask-ba/2012/2613567.html

Appel, the Stanford righthander expected to go No. 1 overall but who dropped to the Pirates at No. 8, certainly could sign with a Japanese team and try to become a free agent. Whether he'd actually hit the open market is the real question.
You have to scroll down to read the rest of the chat.

redsmetz
07-09-2012, 06:57 PM
I don't think it's outside the realm of possibility that Boras sues on Appel's behalf for MLB restraining the players right to sell his services to the highest bidder. Now I have no idea what players sign to be eligible for the draft, so perhaps there's a clause in there that makes them subject to the CBA's draft terms. Otherwise, I'm perplexed how MLB and the Union can enter into an agreement that effects people not a party to the agreement. Again, I imagine there are ways that can be done. Sooner or later though, someone's going to challenge it.

Nathan
07-09-2012, 07:21 PM
Otherwise, I'm perplexed how MLB and the Union can enter into an agreement that effects people not a party to the agreement. Again, I imagine there are ways that can be done. Sooner or later though, someone's going to challenge it.

Have you met a retiree from a union company? They virtually have NO say in the contract negotiations, yet, pensions are a major part of them. Companies and Unions can negotiate contracts that has sections about non-current personnel.

redsmetz
07-09-2012, 07:54 PM
Have you met a retiree from a union company? They virtually have NO say in the contract negotiations, yet, pensions are a major part of them. Companies and Unions can negotiate contracts that has sections about non-current personnel.

I'm not an attorney, but that's coming from the other end I would think. A retiree was still, at some point, part of the bargaining unit and governed by it. Again, it's entirely possible that those entering the MLB draft sign something indicating they're doing so and it's possible there's something in there that binds them to this. All I'm doing is speculating that absent some firmer explanation, it will not surprise me to see someone ultimately sue.

Nathan
07-09-2012, 09:34 PM
I'm not an attorney, but that's coming from the other end I would think. A retiree was still, at some point, part of the bargaining unit and governed by it. Again, it's entirely possible that those entering the MLB draft sign something indicating they're doing so and it's possible there's something in there that binds them to this. All I'm doing is speculating that absent some firmer explanation, it will not surprise me to see someone ultimately sue.

Wow.. I wasn't really trying to start a debate on here on something like that.

I was going to post after that statement, this has got to be one of the worst things for baseball. I thought it was a stupid idea from the get go, and it's really going to hurt the game. If Appel doesn't sign, it will probably just be the beginning of "Why the draft cap sucks!" Ugh.. Please, Mr. Boras, sue!

Blitz Dorsey
07-09-2012, 09:37 PM
FYI: The Pirates shelled out $8 million to sign the No. 1 overall pick of the 2011 draft -- Gerrit Cole.

WMR
07-09-2012, 09:43 PM
A business is allowed to set the terms under which they will employ someone. Just because you weren't a member when the terms were negotiated doesn't mean you have a right to dispute them once you do become a member affected by those negotiations.

You're free to refuse to participate in that established model and go sell your services somewhere else. This was all bargained for between the players and the owners. A lawsuit is impractical and would go nowhere.

WMR
07-09-2012, 09:48 PM
IMO, what baseball really needs to add is a hard slot system which would clean up a lot of this draft silliness.

(And make the draft international while you're at it.)

redsmetz
07-09-2012, 09:53 PM
A business is allowed to set the terms under which they will employ someone. Just because you weren't a member when the terms were negotiated doesn't mean you have a right to dispute them once you do become a member affected by those negotiations.

You're free to refuse to participate in that established model and go sell your services somewhere else. This was all bargained for between the players and the owners. A lawsuit is impractical and would go nowhere.

Minor leaguers aren't members of the bargaining unit either. They join the union when they get called up (or possibly when added to the 40 man roster - don't know that finer point). No question they're governed by it when they join then.

A lawsuit might be "impractical" and it likely will not go anywhere particularly given that MLB is not governed by anti-trust laws (since, of course, the Supreme Court decided 80+ years ago that it's not a business).

I'm not advocating for a lawsuit, but am saying it wouldn't surprise me. It could succeed. No question, players do have options (go back to school, go to Japan - unless our agreements with those leagues preclude that ala the way Japanesse players can't just jump to MLB).

redsmetz
07-09-2012, 09:54 PM
Wow.. I wasn't really trying to start a debate on here on something like that.

I was going to post after that statement, this has got to be one of the worst things for baseball. I thought it was a stupid idea from the get go, and it's really going to hurt the game. If Appel doesn't sign, it will probably just be the beginning of "Why the draft cap sucks!" Ugh.. Please, Mr. Boras, sue!

I'm sorry, are you assuming I'm picking a fight over this? Not in the least. But as I just said elsewhere, a lawsuit wouldn't surprise me.

WMR
07-09-2012, 09:56 PM
Minor leaguers aren't members of the bargaining unit either. They join the union when they get called up (or possibly when added to the 40 man roster - don't know that finer point). No question they're governed by it when they join then.

A lawsuit might be "impractical" and it likely will not go anywhere particularly given that MLB is not governed by anti-trust laws (since, of course, the Supreme Court decided 80+ years ago that it's not a business).

I'm not advocating for a lawsuit, but am saying it wouldn't surprise me. It could succeed. No question, players do have options (go back to school, go to Japan - unless our agreements with those leagues preclude that ala the way Japanesse players can't just jump to MLB).

What would he actually be suing for? Nullify the draft? Make every amateur player a free agent?

redsmetz
07-09-2012, 10:10 PM
What would he actually be suing for? Nullify the draft? Make every amateur player a free agent?

No, I think it would be to overturn the slotting system, to permit the drafted player to negotiate whatever the market would bear. It's a restraint of trade argument that likely would be difficult to win given baseball's anti-trust immunity, although this article discussing a similar possible argument (also involving Scott Boras) with the posting arrangement with Japan. I think the article does a good job of laying out the hurdles. Keep in mind too, that these young players have a limited time window to get on with their professional career if they can't play while a lawsuit goes on.

http://thesportslawprofessor.blogspot.com/2006/12/is-posting-of-japanese-baseball.html

WMR
07-09-2012, 10:29 PM
No, I think it would be to overturn the slotting system, to permit the drafted player to negotiate whatever the market would bear. It's a restraint of trade argument that likely would be difficult to win given baseball's anti-trust immunity, although this article discussing a similar possible argument (also involving Scott Boras) with the posting arrangement with Japan. I think the article does a good job of laying out the hurdles. Keep in mind too, that these young players have a limited time window to get on with their professional career if they can't play while a lawsuit goes on.

http://thesportslawprofessor.blogspot.com/2006/12/is-posting-of-japanese-baseball.html

There isn't a slotting system. There's a form of salary cap on the amount teams can spend on their draft picks, but a team is still allowed to go over slot if they so desire to sign a particular player.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/joe_lemire/11/22/cba.draft.changes/index.html


From the article you posted... (my earlier post)

I'm thinking of the Wood vs. NBA decision, which held that even a player not currently in the bargaining unit is nonetheless represented in the bargaining unit.

The overriding point in all of this is that this was all negotiated and agreed upon in the latest CBA.

It would be funny to see Boras try to sue over this issue, because, IMO, it would fail spectacularly.

The best argument against the posting system is a team's ability to game the system by winning the posting bid and then purposefully refusing to reach a contract agreement with the Japanese player.

AtomicDumpling
07-09-2012, 10:38 PM
Apparently Houston asked Appel before the draft if he would accept a $6 million signing bonus if they used the first pick of the draft on him. He said that was not enough so Houston drafted someone else instead. So either Scott Boras has a trick up his sleeve or he left a ton of money on the table for his client.

mattfeet
07-09-2012, 10:56 PM
FYI: The Pirates shelled out $8 million to sign the No. 1 overall pick of the 2011 draft -- Gerrit Cole.

While true, that was also under the old CBA rules.


-Matt

WMR
07-09-2012, 10:59 PM
Apparently Houston asked Appel before the draft if he would accept a $6 million signing bonus if they used the first pick of the draft on him. He said that was not enough so Houston drafted someone else instead. So either Scott Boras has a trick up his sleeve or he left a ton of money on the table for his client.

Perhaps Boras had an assurance from a late-picking big market club that they would give him seven million plus and the Pirates decided to throw a monkey wrench into those plans? :D

AtomicDumpling
07-10-2012, 12:45 AM
Perhaps Boras had an assurance from a late-picking big market club that they would give him seven million plus and the Pirates decided to throw a monkey wrench into those plans? :D

Well that is a definite possibility. If so I am glad they did.

redsmetz
07-10-2012, 07:00 AM
There isn't a slotting system. There's a form of salary cap on the amount teams can spend on their draft picks, but a team is still allowed to go over slot if they so desire to sign a particular player.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/joe_lemire/11/22/cba.draft.changes/index.html


From the article you posted... (my earlier post)


The overriding point in all of this is that this was all negotiated and agreed upon in the latest CBA.

It would be funny to see Boras try to sue over this issue, because, IMO, it would fail spectacularly.

The best argument against the posting system is a team's ability to game the system by winning the posting bid and then purposefully refusing to reach a contract agreement with the Japanese player.

Again, I'm not advocating a lawsuit, and I'll be the first to say this is all very complicated, but you may well be right that it will fail spectacularly. The difference between the NBA and the NFL may be that players drafted enter into the milieu of the bargaining unit immediately, whereas baseball players rarely do so.

It's possible, as I've said earlier, that Appel doesn't have a good clock for filing such a suit (nor any draftee). He would be unable to play while it goes on, although it's not out of the realm of possibility that one could sign a contract and sue for damages (for whatever amount his bonus is diminished), but I think that is a much riskier course. Other options are for him to go back to school, but as others said in our own draftee signing thread, a college junior will have even less leverage next year.

Gotta run.

Blitz Dorsey
07-10-2012, 07:52 AM
While true, that was also under the old CBA rules.


-Matt

True, was just posting that for comparison purposes. I find it interesting that Pittsburgh paid $8 million for its 2011 first-rounder but might lose Appel. Both Cole and Appel were Pac-10 (Pac-12) pitchers projected to go No. 1 in the draft.

If Appel doesn't sign, it wouldn't be the Pirates' fault though, IMO. If they offer the max they can offer ($3.84 mil) without losing next year's first round pick and Appel turns it down, that's on Appel. Would be a foolish move on his/Boras' part.

That's why if I had to guess, I bet Appel ends up signing with the Pirates at the last minute. He's not going to turn down close to $4 million to go back to college and risk injury or go to Japan and risk injury. I mean, there's a chance he'll take the risk, I just highly doubt it. The Pirates won't budge here. They'll just sit back and get two first-rounders next year if they don't ink Appel.

redsmetz
07-10-2012, 08:17 AM
True, was just posting that for comparison purposes. I find it interesting that Pittsburgh paid $8 million for its 2011 first-rounder but might lose Appel. Both Cole and Appel were Pac-10 (Pac-12) pitchers projected to go No. 1 in the draft.

If Appel doesn't sign, it wouldn't be the Pirates' fault though, IMO. If they offer the max they can offer ($3.84 mil) without losing next year's first round pick and Appel turns it down, that's on Appel. Would be a foolish move on his/Boras' part.

That's why if I had to guess, I bet Appel ends up signing with the Pirates at the last minute. He's not going to turn down close to $4 million to go back to college and risk injury or go to Japan and risk injury. I mean, there's a chance he'll take the risk, I just highly doubt it. The Pirates won't budge here. They'll just sit back and get two first-rounders next year if they don't ink Appel.

This is probably the likeliest scenario. And I'm guessing that Appel and Boras will keep their memory caps on when it comes time to negotiate contracts when the pendulum swings their way.

kaldaniels
07-10-2012, 08:51 AM
If Appel is as good as I'm sure he thinks he is (not a bad thing) he needs to figure that waiting one year will cost him one year of free agency down the road. Which if he is just league average, will be about 10 million or so in 10 years. (if not today)

REDREAD
07-10-2012, 09:42 AM
It will be interesting to see how this plays out.
Boras has been on a lifelong mission to "Bust the system" and get as much money for the players as possible. He's ruined the fortunes of a few draftees to do it, but overall has helped the players more than hurt them.

I guess the question is.. Is Appel willing to be a sacrificial lamb in this process? I wouldn't be if I was him.

dougdirt
07-10-2012, 10:57 AM
Minor leaguers aren't members of the bargaining unit either. They join the union when they get called up (or possibly when added to the 40 man roster - don't know that finer point). No question they're governed by it when they join then.

It is when they are added to the 40 man roster. The only reason I know that is because randomly in the middle of the year, the Brewers added Jeremy Jeffress to their 40 man roster and didn't call him up. He had 2 drug related suspensions to his name already and a 3rd one would have gotten him kicked out. Both were for smoking pot. In the minor leagues they test for that. In the Major Leagues they don't. Since he was then considered a Major Leaguer, he didn't have to be tested for pot anymore.

Blitz Dorsey
07-10-2012, 11:31 AM
If Appel is as good as I'm sure he thinks he is (not a bad thing) he needs to figure that waiting one year will cost him one year of free agency down the road. Which if he is just league average, will be about 10 million or so in 10 years. (if not today)

Good point.

Another thing for him to consider: It's unlikely he'll get a higher (or much higher) signing bonus than $4 million next year anyway. Way to much risk compared to the reward for him to go back to college or go to Japan.

You know Boras will wait this one out and make the Pirates sweat, but I bet Appel eventually signs. The fact that the Buccos are having a good season will only help their cause.

cumberlandreds
07-10-2012, 11:37 AM
Good point.

Another thing for him to consider: It's unlikely he'll get a higher (or much higher) signing bonus than $4 million next year anyway. Way to much risk compared to the reward for him to go back to college or go to Japan.

You know Boras will wait this one out and make the Pirates sweat, but I bet Appel eventually signs. The fact that the Buccos are having a good season will only help their cause.

Does he really have the option to go back to college since he has an agent? I don't think he does. I know in college basketball and football once you hire an agent you are no longer eligible for NCAA play.

Chip R
07-10-2012, 11:43 AM
Does he really have the option to go back to college since he has an agent? I don't think he does. I know in college basketball and football once you hire an agent you are no longer eligible for NCAA play.

I believe they get around that by the agents acting as "advisors" and - I assume - working for free until the player signs.

cumberlandreds
07-10-2012, 11:52 AM
I believe they get around that by the agents acting as "advisors" and - I assume - working for free until the player signs.

I sort of thought that. A good way to get around those pesky loopholes.

Most of these guys end up signing. The ones that don't are taking a huge chance. It seems in the past the ones that don't sign end up costing themselves a lot of money.

Blitz Dorsey
07-10-2012, 11:55 AM
Does he really have the option to go back to college since he has an agent? I don't think he does. I know in college basketball and football once you hire an agent you are no longer eligible for NCAA play.

For whatever reason, it's different in baseball. Appel absolutely has the option of returning to Stanford. It's the only way players have any leverage.

Edit: I see Chip came through with the answer.

kaldaniels
07-10-2012, 01:02 PM
Good point.

Another thing for him to consider: It's unlikely he'll get a higher (or much higher) signing bonus than $4 million next year anyway. Way to much risk compared to the reward for him to go back to college or go to Japan.

You know Boras will wait this one out and make the Pirates sweat, but I bet Appel eventually signs. The fact that the Buccos are having a good season will only help their cause.

The more I think about it sitting out a year doesn't necessarily delay his arrival to the majors but it certainly isn't going to help. To each his own I suppose, but I think there is too much to lose by sitting out a year.

fearofpopvol1
07-10-2012, 02:46 PM
me thinks that boras is going to start seeing his leverage be less of a factor moving forward.

kaldaniels
07-13-2012, 11:58 PM
Back to school! :beerme:

dougdirt
07-14-2012, 12:00 AM
Back to school! :beerme:

To prove to dad that he's not a fool?

JaxRed
07-14-2012, 12:03 AM
I don't remember the details but I had always wondered about how non-40 man roster guys could be bound by the CBA. But there was already a court decision or arbitrator ruling that made it ok.

kaldaniels
07-14-2012, 12:03 AM
To prove to dad that he's not a fool?

:laugh:

fearofpopvol1
07-14-2012, 12:04 AM
Does he really think he's going to get more money next year? In a deeper draft class? The new rules are the rules now. The Pirates were already willing to take a penalty. Boras is going to have to get used to it.

Chip R
07-14-2012, 12:13 AM
Maybe he just didn't want to sign with the Pirates.

WVPacman
07-14-2012, 12:19 AM
Maybe he just didn't want to sign with the Pirates.

Thats what I was thinking chip

kaldaniels
07-14-2012, 12:33 AM
Maybe he just didn't want to sign with the Pirates.

If that's the case, wouldn't he have let the Pirates know before they drafted him? Not that it would stop them from drafting him. I think it's all about the cash grab, not the Pirates.

vaticanplum
07-14-2012, 12:34 AM
I believe they get around that by the agents acting as "advisors" and - I assume - working for free until the player signs.

That's...is that ok? If the agent isn't getting paid until the player signs, that's going to severely color the agent's "advising" of him. He can't possibly act objectively in his best interests.

As an agent, that's fine -- there's the understanding that the agent gets paid according to what the player makes, everything he makes, and the player has that grain of salt in mind. The player *employs* the agent. And can fire him, which the agent knows, and which will keep him in certain check. But "advisor" implies a different role.

I'm not saying there's a legal problem here. It just sits uncomfortably with me.

mth123
07-14-2012, 02:29 AM
Wonder if failing to sign Appel will cause the Pirates to think twice about trading any of their other young pitchers at the deadline. This may impact the race this year.

757690
07-14-2012, 02:50 AM
That's...is that ok? If the agent isn't getting paid until the player signs, that's going to severely color the agent's "advising" of him. He can't possibly act objectively in his best interests.

As an agent, that's fine -- there's the understanding that the agent gets paid according to what the player makes, everything he makes, and the player has that grain of salt in mind. The player *employs* the agent. And can fire him, which the agent knows, and which will keep him in certain check. But "advisor" implies a different role.

I'm not saying there's a legal problem here. It just sits uncomfortably with me.

This isn't even close to the slimiest thing that agents do, but I agree, it's a very uncomfortable arrangement. I can't imagine this would be allowed in any other business.

membengal
07-14-2012, 07:17 AM
This is all about Scott Boras and his crusade against the new CBA.

dougdirt
07-14-2012, 09:59 AM
This isn't even close to the slimiest thing that agents do, but I agree, it's a very uncomfortable arrangement. I can't imagine this would be allowed in any other business.

Baseball and sports in general do a lot of things that wouldn't be allowed in any other business. You leave school and you are picked by an employee, you don't pick them. Then, unless you are "sold" to another employee, you must stay with them for X years or retire. You don't get to choose where you work. You are the absolute best in your field, but in some sports there is a cap on how much you are allowed to make, even if others make that much and you are clearly better than they are. I could go on for days, but I won't. Sports aren't like any other business.

dabvu2498
07-14-2012, 11:11 AM
For whatever reason, it's different in baseball. Appel absolutely has the option of returning to Stanford. It's the only way players have any leverage.

Edit: I see Chip came through with the answer.

Could he not have played a year of indy league ball like Hochevar did a few years ago?

Chip R
07-14-2012, 11:12 AM
That's...is that ok? If the agent isn't getting paid until the player signs, that's going to severely color the agent's "advising" of him. He can't possibly act objectively in his best interests.

As an agent, that's fine -- there's the understanding that the agent gets paid according to what the player makes, everything he makes, and the player has that grain of salt in mind. The player *employs* the agent. And can fire him, which the agent knows, and which will keep him in certain check. But "advisor" implies a different role.

I'm not saying there's a legal problem here. It just sits uncomfortably with me.

It's really only applicable in the case of an underclassman being drafted like Appel. If a player is a senior, he can hire an agent. But this is basically to keep a player's amateur status. Basketball has a similar rule where an underclassman can declare for the draft and if he changes his mind after the draft, he can go back to school - and back into the draft pool the following season - as long as he doesn't hire an agent. In football, if you declare for the draft, you can't go back.

I'm sure there are horror stories that have occurred in similar situations but Appel had a choice here: He could accept a mulit-million dollar contract and be on the fast track to the majors or he could go back to Stanford and finish his education then play ball again and go back in the draft. Unless the kid gets hurt, it's a win-win situation.

Plus Plus
07-14-2012, 02:09 PM
It's really only applicable in the case of an underclassman being drafted like Appel. If a player is a senior, he can hire an agent. But this is basically to keep a player's amateur status. Basketball has a similar rule where an underclassman can declare for the draft and if he changes his mind after the draft, he can go back to school - and back into the draft pool the following season - as long as he doesn't hire an agent. In football, if you declare for the draft, you can't go back.

I'm sure there are horror stories that have occurred in similar situations but Appel had a choice here: He could accept a mulit-million dollar contract and be on the fast track to the majors or he could go back to Stanford and finish his education then play ball again and go back in the draft. Unless the kid gets hurt, it's a win-win situation.

Wasn't there an ESPN feature on a baseball player who held out for more money after being drafted, was drafted a second time but went from the first round to the second round, and then was drafted a third time, except in the ~30th round? I don't think he ever signed or caught on anywhere, and went from turning down a signing bonus worth millions to working for an hourly wage as a mechanic.

I hope someone remembers this and can link the article, or some sort of reference.

I think that turning down just under $4m was a big mistake, and Appel will not see a signing bonus near that in a much stronger 2013 draft. Where does he rank in the 2013 class- anyone know?

fearofpopvol1
07-14-2012, 02:15 PM
It's really only applicable in the case of an underclassman being drafted like Appel. If a player is a senior, he can hire an agent. But this is basically to keep a player's amateur status. Basketball has a similar rule where an underclassman can declare for the draft and if he changes his mind after the draft, he can go back to school - and back into the draft pool the following season - as long as he doesn't hire an agent. In football, if you declare for the draft, you can't go back.

I'm sure there are horror stories that have occurred in similar situations but Appel had a choice here: He could accept a mulit-million dollar contract and be on the fast track to the majors or he could go back to Stanford and finish his education then play ball again and go back in the draft. Unless the kid gets hurt, it's a win-win situation.

I don't see it as win-win for the kid at all. He easily could get injured, he's going into a deeper draft class next year, and he also will not have any leverage unless he wants to go to some alternate league. He'll be a year older too. The likeliness that he'll get more money next year is slim.

dougdirt
07-14-2012, 03:44 PM
Wasn't there an ESPN feature on a baseball player who held out for more money after being drafted, was drafted a second time but went from the first round to the second round, and then was drafted a third time, except in the ~30th round? I don't think he ever signed or caught on anywhere, and went from turning down a signing bonus worth millions to working for an hourly wage as a mechanic.

I hope someone remembers this and can link the article, or some sort of reference.

I think that turning down just under $4m was a big mistake, and Appel will not see a signing bonus near that in a much stronger 2013 draft. Where does he rank in the 2013 class- anyone know?

It did happen. It was Matt Harrington. He was drafted 5 times, including once by the Reds who reportedly didn't even offer him a bonus, but just the chance to pitch in the minors.

JaxRed
07-14-2012, 03:50 PM
I think in the article he was working at a tire shop

Superdude
07-14-2012, 03:54 PM
I don't see it as win-win for the kid at all. He easily could get injured, he's going into a deeper draft class next year, and he also will not have any leverage unless he wants to go to some alternate league. He'll be a year older too. The likeliness that he'll get more money next year is slim.

I really don't understand how these pitchers can turn down any of these deals. If someone's willing to give you $1 million+ dollars at 18 or 21 years old for a skill as fleeting as throwing a baseball, how do you turn that down? You're one shoulder injury away from being just another kid fighting for a marginal job in the regular, old workplace.

dougdirt
07-14-2012, 04:27 PM
I really don't understand how these pitchers can turn down any of these deals. If someone's willing to give you $1 million+ dollars at 18 or 21 years old for a skill as fleeting as throwing a baseball, how do you turn that down? You're one shoulder injury away from being just another kid fighting for a marginal job in the regular, old workplace.

Well, when you believe you are worth 7 million and only get offered 4, I can see where you would think that you should turn it down. You also don't think of injuries at those ages, you simply don't.

dougdirt
07-14-2012, 04:30 PM
I think in the article he was working at a tire shop

Checked his wikipedia page.... take it for what its worth, but it claims he was working at Costco.

Crumbley
07-14-2012, 04:44 PM
Costco has a tire shop in the store.

Redlegs
07-14-2012, 11:15 PM
Unfortunate for Pittsburgh and MLB. Be nice to see the Bucs have some sustained success. Would look forward to them battling our Reds for several years.

kaldaniels
07-14-2012, 11:18 PM
Unfortunate for Pittsburgh and MLB. Be nice to see the Bucs have some sustained success. Would look forward to them battling our Reds for several years.

I'm glad it didn't work out. Our divison rival gambled on a tough sign and lost...the alternative was that the top player in the draft signed with them after teams passed due to signability concerns...that is a much worse fate if you ask me.