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Thread: Baseball cards are weird

  1. #46
    Potential Lunch Winner Dom Heffner's Avatar
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    Re: Baseball cards are weird

    If people weren't willing to pay money for a 1952 Topps Mantle, Upper Deck wouldn't care about baseball cards.

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  3. #47
    Potential Lunch Winner Dom Heffner's Avatar
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    Re: Baseball cards are weird

    Quote Originally Posted by 757690 View Post
    Babe Ruth was a just a better player than everyone else too.

    Microsoft just made a nice operating system.

    HBO just made better shows than the networks...
    Oh yes, Ken Griffey is respinsible for baseball cards.

    How old are you guys? 30?

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  5. #48
    Potential Lunch Winner Dom Heffner's Avatar
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    Re: Baseball cards are weird

    It is an influential card- but really, are you suggesting as technology improved baseball cards would have been stuck in the 1980s if not for Ken Griffey Jr?

    This fits into a salesman's narrative as the price plummets to $40.

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  7. #49
    Member SteelSD's Avatar
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    Re: Baseball cards are weird

    Quote Originally Posted by dougdirt View Post
    What other card changed the industry like the Griffey UD did? I can think of a few different sets that changed things moving forward, but not so much a card. The 89 UD set changed things, but the reason the game was changed is because of Griffey. The 89 whateverotherbrand Griffey cards aren't nearly as popular or valuable.
    The '84 Donruss Mattingly and the '86 Donruss Canseco were, IMHO, a bit more influential than the Griffey offering. Both created a huge swell in the collector market; resulting in a glut of cards from all three starting in 1987 (Fleer in '88) during a period of collector rookie card speculation that had been mostly absent prior to that time. Upper Deck certainly capitalized on this, with the Griffey being the primary target for collectors.

    Frankly, the '88 Fleer Billy Ripken "error" variants may have been just as- if not more- important as it demonstrated for the hobby exactly how rabid collectors would be for chase offerings.
    "The problem with strikeouts isn't that they hurt your team, it's that they hurt your feelings..." --Rob Neyer

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  9. #50
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    Re: Baseball cards are weird

    the card of rafael santo domingo was epic

  10. #51
    Member 757690's Avatar
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    Re: Baseball cards are weird

    Quote Originally Posted by Dom Heffner View Post
    It is an influential card- but really, are you suggesting as technology improved baseball cards would have been stuck in the 1980s if not for Ken Griffey Jr?

    This fits into a salesman's narrative as the price plummets to $40.
    If not for his 1989 Upper Deck card. Absolutely.

    If Upper Deck failed, and it could have as many did before them, Topps would have had no incentive to produce their higher end lines like Stadium Club. Having that Ken Griffey jr. Card as their signature card put them on the map and made them into the #1 card company. Remember, Jr. wasn't a star yet, but they chose him to be the star of their card line.

    Concerning other influential cards like the 1952 Mantle and 1968 Ryan, both of which did change the market, both of those were rather cheap for decades, then took off once the baseball card market took off. They followed the market, they didn't set it. 1989 Upper Deck Griffey jr. card set the market, and changed it forever.
    "Man, the pitch looks fast, even in slow motion." Thom Brennaman on Chapman's fastball.

  11. #52
    The Boss dougdirt's Avatar
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    Re: Baseball cards are weird

    Quote Originally Posted by Dom Heffner View Post
    Oh yes, Ken Griffey is respinsible for baseball cards.

    How old are you guys? 30?
    I will be 30 in April, but I used to be pretty deep into the card industry.

    The 52 Topps Mantle is always an interesting discussion. Not his rookie card, but his most sought after card. Of course, we know why it is so rare at this point and thus more valuable than his 51 Bowman. Still, it has to be one of the very few second year cards that are worth more than the rookie card.

  12. #53
    The rest is drama. marcshoe's Avatar
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    Re: Baseball cards are weird

    When I was ten, this card convinced me that Rich Robertson was Jim Nabors in disguise.



    This was two years before I found out I needed glasses.

    I bought more cards in '72 than any other year. They weren't kept in great shape; I drew mustaches on all of the A's, whether the player had grown one or not. After all, does this look right to you?



    I sold most of my cards to pay for college, but I still have this one:


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  14. #54
    Potential Lunch Winner Dom Heffner's Avatar
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    Re: Baseball cards are weird

    Quote Originally Posted by dougdirt View Post
    I will be 30 in April, but I used to be pretty deep into the card industry.

    The 52 Topps Mantle is always an interesting discussion. Not his rookie card, but his most sought after card. Of course, we know why it is so rare at this point and thus more valuable than his 51 Bowman. Still, it has to be one of the very few second year cards that are worth more than the rookie card.
    I'll give you that it is one of the more influential cards but it just isn't the most influential.

    And Doug is qualifying now where he didn't before. Of course, he may have been just saying that not to be taken so literally.

    As someone who collected alll through the 70s, I can tell you that once Rose got close to Cobb things took a significant turn.

    But if we're just going to say which card had more influence over card quality, Griffey is it, I guess, but that is sort of a chicken or egg thing.

    With Score's 1988 release cards were looking better already .

  15. #55
    Potential Lunch Winner Dom Heffner's Avatar
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    Re: Baseball cards are weird

    Quote Originally Posted by marcshoe View Post
    When I was ten, this card convinced me that Rich Robertson was Jim Nabors in disguise.



    This was two years before I found out I needed glasses.

    I bought more cards in '72 than any other year. They weren't kept in great shape; I drew mustaches on all of the A's, whether the player had grown one or not. After all, does this look right to you?



    I sold most of my cards to pay for college, but I still have this one:

    The 1972 set is a thing of beauty.

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  17. #56
    5.3 Posts Abv Replacement BluegrassRedleg's Avatar
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    Re: Baseball cards are weird

    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph View Post


    There's a hockey player named Clutterbuck. I'll have to find out if they are related.
    That's almost Kenny Powers-esque.
    Rounding third and heading for home...

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  19. #57
    5.3 Posts Abv Replacement BluegrassRedleg's Avatar
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    Re: Baseball cards are weird

    Quote Originally Posted by Redsfaithful View Post
    I'm working on a complete Topps Reds set 1952-present. Have everything from 1971 on, but now it gets expensive, of course. Anyone else do anything like this?
    Wow. I've been doing the same thing, only from 1971 (birth year). That's quite an undertaking going back to 1952! Good luck.
    Rounding third and heading for home...

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  21. #58
    5.3 Posts Abv Replacement BluegrassRedleg's Avatar
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    Re: Baseball cards are weird

    Quote Originally Posted by Dom Heffner View Post
    Most influential?

    I'd give that to a few other cards.
    Maybe just semantics. I know what Doug is referring to. That card caused ripples in the card industry like no other before it. People would buy entire boxes of those 89 UDs and rifle through the packs just seeking that one card.
    Rounding third and heading for home...

  22. #59
    Flash the leather! _Sir_Charles_'s Avatar
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    Re: Baseball cards are weird

    Quote Originally Posted by Dom Heffner View Post
    The 1972 set is a thing of beauty.
    72 through 75 were all top notch IMO. Unique borders and excellent photos. Definitely my favorite era for cards by far.
    2014 predictions:
    99-63 WS champs (Cards take 2nd WC, Mil 3rd, Pit 4th, Chi 5th)
    Bruce/Votto neck and neck MVP race (neither takes it)
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  24. #60
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    Re: Baseball cards are weird

    Quote Originally Posted by BluegrassRedleg View Post
    Maybe just semantics. I know what Doug is referring to. That card caused ripples in the card industry like no other before it. People would buy entire boxes of those 89 UDs and rifle through the packs just seeking that one card.
    Yes, I was one of those ripping through '89 UD packs. But that's not the first time during the 80's that type of thing happened and, with respect to Upper Deck, interest revolved almost solely around the Griffey card in isolation; although product quality retained collector interest for the next couple of years. Important, yes, but not unprecedented.

    The '84 Donruss Mattingly rookie created behavior rarely (if ever) seen in the hobby. Packs shot up to $10.00 or more in the aftermarket. I actually had a dealer removed from a card show for re-sealing and selling searched packs. That card, along with Canseco's '86 Donruss card, were also the target of a number of counterfeit attempts; significant enough that we started to see guides showing us telling us how to spot them.

    That Mattingly card was so sought after that it actually had an effect of pushing the value of the set's minor rookie cards (see: Brook Jacoby) to $15-$20, minor stars at $5-$10, and commons at $2 or more at the peak. Even hand-collated sets were pushing $200 before Upper Deck issued their first card. That was fairly unprecedented as the packs, while produced in a lower volume than other sets, were scare almost solely due to Mattingly (and, to a lesser extent Strawberry) but nice looking enough that folks still wanted to put a set together.

    Upper Deck paved the way for the next evolution but the '89 set is likely less historically important than even something like the '92 Bowman offering; which put a new shine (for better or worse) on the words "rookie card".

    However, that '84 Donruss Mattingly literally caused every other card associated with the set to be worth significantly more than it should have been. That's pretty unique in the hobby's history.
    Last edited by SteelSD; 01-11-2014 at 08:11 PM.
    "The problem with strikeouts isn't that they hurt your team, it's that they hurt your feelings..." --Rob Neyer

    "The single most important thing for a hitter is to get a good pitch to hit. A good hitter can hit a pitch that’s over the plate three times better than a great hitter with a ball in a tough spot.”
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