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Thread: Commonly misused words and phrases

  1. #31
    Bunn-O-matic max venable's Avatar
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    Re: Commonly misused words and phrases

    More redundancies:

    I'll repeat it again.
    The sum total. Total is sufficient thank you. And related to this is total number.
    That's their usual custom.
    What are the weather conditions?
    It was brief in duration.
    Have you reached a final conclusion?
    Oh, it's adequate enough.
    News reporters: An armed guman walked in to the store...
    And...as an added bonus...
    We have the building completely surrounded. As opposed to just partly surrounded, I guess.
    I just completed my doctorate degree... Oh really, guess it wasn't in English
    The President made a statement saying...
    None at all. As if none doesn't cover it. C'mon, none means none, folks.
    For every action there is an equal and opposite criticism.

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  3. #32
    For a Level Playing Field RedFanAlways1966's Avatar
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    Re: Commonly misused words and phrases

    Quote Originally Posted by max venable
    None at all. As if none doesn't cover it. C'mon none means none, folks.
    What if a person says... "I ain't got none"? Then none, in conjunction with ain't, must mean that that person has some.

    WHAT!??! Danny Graves says that the above is not grammatically correct and only people from Kentucky talk that way!?!?
    Small market fan... always hoping, but never expecting.

  4. #33
    Raaaaaaaandy guttle11's Avatar
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    Re: Commonly misused words and phrases

    When people say or write "supposively", I get angry for some reason.
    "I saw Wedding Crashers accidentally. I bought a ticket for Grizzly Man and went into the wrong theater. After an hour, I figured I was in the wrong theater, but I kept waiting. Thatís the thing about bear attacks. They come when you least expect it."-Dwight K. Schrute

  5. #34
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    Re: Commonly misused words and phrases

    Affect vs. effect

    It's "a lot," not "alot"

    "alright" isn't a word. It's actually "all right."

    Among= used with more than two items
    Between= used with exactly two items

    Anxious= worried
    Eager= excited or looking forward to something

    Bad= an adjective that modifies a noun
    Badly= an adverb that modifies a verb

    Can= capbable of doing something
    May= permission or the chance to do something

    Complement= to complete
    Compliment= to flatter or praise

    "Consenus of opinion"= redundant(just use consenus)

    Criteria= factors
    Criterion= only one factor

    Desert= a barren place
    Dessert= something to eat

    Embarrassment= spelled like that
    Harassment= spelled like that

    Farther= distance
    Further= length of time, quantity or intensity

    Feel= a state of being or a sense of touch.

    Fewer= a specific number of items you could count
    Less= a collection of items, a period of time or a quantity

    Goes without saying= Do NOT say it

    It's= It is
    Its= a possessive word meaning belonging to it

    Join= correct
    Join together= incorrect (nothing can be joined apart)

    Judgment= No e

    Media= plural when talking about all forms
    Medium= just newspapers

    Stationary= something stays the same
    Stationery= paper you use for letters

    Than= used for comparison
    Then= used for time

    Toward= correct(not towards)

    Unique= one of a kind, incomparable. You cannot have something "more" or "most" unique

    Who= the subject and does the action
    Whom= the object and receives the action
    And this one belongs to the Reds!!!- Hall of Famer Marty Brennaman

  6. #35
    Bunn-O-matic max venable's Avatar
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    Re: Commonly misused words and phrases

    Quote Originally Posted by CincyRedsFan30

    Anxious= worried
    Eager= excited or looking forward to something
    Yes! Anxious may be THE most misused word in the English language.
    For every action there is an equal and opposite criticism.

  7. #36
    Dunnilicious creek14's Avatar
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    Re: Commonly misused words and phrases

    Alright, Im ascared too post hear alot four feer im gonna cey sumthin rong.
    Will trade this space for a #1 starter.

  8. #37
    Mon chou Choo vaticanplum's Avatar
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    Re: Commonly misused words and phrases

    Quote Originally Posted by max venable
    Yes! Anxious may be THE most misused word in the English language.
    I would give that prize to "nauseous".

    One is not nauseous. One is nauseated.
    There is no such thing as a pitching prospect.

  9. #38
    Making sense of it all Matt700wlw's Avatar
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    Re: Commonly misused words and phrases

    "could care less"....well if you could, you would. It's "COULDN'T care less"

  10. #39
    Potential Lunch Winner Dom Heffner's Avatar
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    Re: Commonly misused words and phrases

    Judgment= No e
    Judgment is preferred, but judgement is acceptable.

    Anxious= worried
    Eager= excited or looking forward to something
    A few online dictionaries give both meanings, though the preferred usage is as you say...

    anxious(p): eagerly desirous; "anxious to see the new show at the museum"; "dying to hear who won"
    causing or fraught with or showing anxiety; "spent an anxious night waiting for the test results"; "cast anxious glances behind her"; "those nervous moments before takeoff"; "an unquiet mind"

    Usage Note: Anxious has a long history of use roughly as a synonym for eager, but many prefer that anxious be used only when its subject is worried or uneasy about the anticipated event. In the traditional view, one may say We are anxious to see the strike settled soon but not We are anxious to see the new show of British sculpture at the museum. Fifty-two percent of the Usage Panel rejects anxious in the latter sentence. But general adoption of anxious to mean "eager" is understandable, at least in colloquial discourse, since it provides a means of adding emotional urgency to an assertion. It implies that the subject so strongly desires a certain outcome that frustration of that desire will lead to unhappiness. In this way, it resembles the informal adjective dying in sentences such as I'm dying to see your new baby.

    Also found this usage note helpful in distinguishing between vs. among:

    "According to a widely repeated but unjustified tradition, "between is used for two, and among for more than two." It is true that between is the only choice when exactly two entities are specified: the choice between (not among) good and evil, the rivalry between (not among) Great Britain and France. When more than two entities are involved, however, or when the number of entities is unspecified, the choice of one or the other word depends on the intended sense. Between is used when the entities are considered as distinct individuals; among, when they are considered as a mass or collectivity. Thus in the sentence The bomb landed between the houses, the houses are seen as points that define the boundaries of the area of impact (so that we presume that none of the individual houses was hit). In The bomb landed among the houses, the area of impact is considered to be the general location of the houses, taken together (in which case it is left open whether any houses were hit). By the same token, we may speak of a series of wars between the Greek cities, which suggests that each city was an independent participant in the hostilities, or of a series of wars among the Greek cities, which allows for the possibility that the participants were shifting alliances of cities. For this reason, among is used to indicate inclusion in a group: She is among the best of our young sculptors. There is a spy among you. Use between when the entities are seen as determining the limits or endpoints of a range: They searched the area between the river, the farmhouse, and the woods. The truck driver had obviously been drinking between stops."

    http://www.thefreedictionary.com

  11. #40
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    Re: Commonly misused words and phrases

    Quote Originally Posted by RedsManRick
    http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=enthuse

    Apparently Enthuse is in good company as a back formation. I see no problem with it.
    Back-formations are as much a part of language as portmanteaus and compounds. I'm not taking issue with back-formations. I would add the words "edit" and "escalate" to the list of successful back-formations (from "editor" and "escalator" respectively).

    It's just that "enthuse" is a particularly bad back-formation largely for the reasons listed in the objection on that website--it's a transitive/intransitive ambiguity. It's just kind of a silly word, either way; it doesn't add much to the language except conceptual fuzziness.
    Last edited by Falls City Beer; 02-28-2006 at 07:47 PM.

  12. #41
    Potential Lunch Winner Dom Heffner's Avatar
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    Re: Commonly misused words and phrases

    Speaking of which, it's amazing how many people use the word "ironic" incorrectly. It's not ironic that something odd or coincidental happened, it's just odd or coincidental.
    I used to beat up on Alanis Morrissette for destroying the meaning of the word, but when you look at its second meaning, she may have been on to something, perhaps, with one or two of her examples:

    ironic - characterized by often poignant difference or incongruity between what is expected and what actually is;


    Do any of these things count as irony then?:

    Rain on your wedding day

    Black fly in your chardonnay

    A traffic jam when you're already late (I don't think so here at all)

    A free ride when you've already paid

    Good advice you didn't take (?)

    Meeting the man of your dreams and then meeting his beautiful wife

    An old man turned ninety-eight
    He won the lottery and died the next day

    Mr. Play It Safe was afraid to fly
    He packed his suitcase and kissed his kids goodbye
    He waited his whole damn life to take that flight
    And as the plane crashed down he thought
    "Well isn't this nice..."

    Maybe one or two of these fit the second definition...I dunno.

  13. #42
    Bunn-O-matic max venable's Avatar
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    Re: Commonly misused words and phrases

    Ready for more redundant phrases? Hope so. Here they are:

    tuna fish (this, of course, is different than tuna pork)
    Easter Sunday (as opposed to Easter Thursday)
    We specialize in all cars, foreign and domestic (just in case "all" leaves you wondering.)
    totally destroyed (not just a little destroyed but TOTALLY destroyed).
    thought to himself (I don't know, can you think to someone else?)
    serious danger (is there another kind of danger?)
    personal friend (what's the alternative, an impersonal friend?)
    Awful Tragedy (yes, we often feel the need to distinguish between the good tragedies and the bad ones)
    For every action there is an equal and opposite criticism.

  14. #43
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    Re: Commonly misused words and phrases

    Quote Originally Posted by vaticanplum
    I would give that prize to "nauseous".

    One is not nauseous. One is nauseated.
    Excellent one. The meal was nauseous. The man was nauseated after eating it.

  15. #44
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    Re: Commonly misused words and phrases

    The word "tragedy" has been butchered in the contemporary parlance. Not all bad things that happen are "tragedies." A huge mudslide that kills 1500 people isn't a "tragedy," it's a disaster. A tragedy involves human volition.

  16. #45
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    Re: Commonly misused words and phrases

    Quote Originally Posted by Dom Heffner
    Judgment is preferred, but judgement is acceptable.
    I should have clarified that I was referring to the usages according to AP Style.

    AP Style says no 'e' there and not to use anxious when you are trying to say you are looking forward to something.
    And this one belongs to the Reds!!!- Hall of Famer Marty Brennaman


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