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Thread: Let's all take a deep breath (everyone please read)

  1. #346
    Member Spitball's Avatar
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    Re: Let's all take a deep breath (everyone please read)

    Quote Originally Posted by red-in-la
    The death of objective truth.....
    "I am your child from the future. I'm sorry I didn't tell you this earlier." - Dylan Easton

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  3. #347
    BobC, get a legit F.O.! Mario-Rijo's Avatar
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    Re: Let's all take a deep breath (everyone please read)

    Or maybe some people need to step away from the T.V. and Radio during Red's broadcasts for awhile. Go swimming, read a book, watch a movie do something fun because it's painfully obvious that some here need a break from the Red's more than this board. Certainly it doesn't help that when they irritate the crap out of ya, somebody is there to needle you when you are down. So by all means take a sick day, when ya can't stands it no more.


    I myself just step away from the baseball and put the remote down!
    "You can't let praise or criticism get to you. It's a weakness to get caught up in either one."

    --Woody Hayes

  4. #348
    Resident optimist OldRightHander's Avatar
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    Re: Let's all take a deep breath (everyone please read)

    Quote Originally Posted by TStuck
    Ah... here is the heart of this entire discussion. Everyone needs to realize that every one who is a member here enjoys the PRIVILEGE of posting here. I repeat this is a PRIVILEGE not a RIGHT. The owners of this board "invite" us to come and discuss a favorite topic - our beloved Reds. Since it is their house, THE OWNERS have the right to establish the ground rules (which they have) and enforce them as they see fit (which they try to do). As house guests, we are asked to observe and abide by the rules. Come on folks, this is etiquette 101. Let's stop all the feuding and get back to doing what this place was created for - TALKIN' REDS BASEBALL!
    Amen

  5. #349
    Member SandyD's Avatar
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    Re: Let's all take a deep breath (everyone please read)

    Actually, for me, the low points of the baseball season are just as important as the high points. Baseball is as much about failure as it is about success. It's about building success out of failure.

    The best team in baseball will lose roughly a third of it's games, and the worst will likely win about a third. The best batter makes an out over half the time. Most, about 2/3rds? A pitcher will get the out more often than not, yet there's a losing pitcher every game.

    Some wins are self-aggrandizing when your team CLOBBERS their opponent. Some are hilarious when the opposing team seems to hand the game to yours. Some are uplifting and exhilarating, such as a walk-off home run in the bottom of the ninth, or the bottom of the 13th, such as Junior vs Dodgers in 2002. (I was there.) Maybe even a bloop single or a sac fly that allows the winning run to score. But you have to take the losses too. Crushing defeats, comedies of errors, painful loses when the BP gives up a 9 run lead to a lower tier team in the ninth. You just can't let those get you down. Because tomorrow (or the next day), there's another game.

    It's a long and grueling season. I'm just glad it's May and not September.


  6. #350
    RZ Chamber of Commerce Unassisted's Avatar
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    Re: Let's all take a deep breath (everyone please read)

    Quote Originally Posted by TStuck
    Everyone needs to realize that every one who is a member here enjoys the PRIVILEGE of posting here. I repeat this is a PRIVILEGE not a RIGHT. The owners of this board "invite" us to come and discuss a favorite topic - our beloved Reds. Since it is their house, THE OWNERS have the right to establish the ground rules (which they have) and enforce them as they see fit (which they try to do). As house guests, we are asked to observe and abide by the rules.
    It is the owners' board, but it's not quite so cut-and-dried. Since some of us have seen fit to send a few shekels the owners' way via the tip jar, I would argue that a donors' investment is more than emotional... we have paid for the "privilege" you cite. (And paid for some other posters' privilege, I might add. ) In the same way that members vote for or against posts with rep, donors vote for or against the board's management (or continued existence) with a donation, or the lack thereof.

    I plan to keep an eye on the decisions that come out of this feedback session and "vote" accordingly with my donation next year.

  7. #351
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    Re: Let's all take a deep breath (everyone please read)

    In addition to what Unassisted said above you have to remember that if the party-goers decide to leave 'cause they aren't having a good time, then there is no party. At that point it doesn't matter who's living room it is.

    This board is just like any other business; it's important to listen to what your customers want. It's my impression that this is what this thread is about. Boss started it so he must have perceived that there were some customers that weren't happy. He did a smart thing---he asked his customers what they would like. As long as the thread doesn't get out of hand it's likely that some useful changes will come out of this little 'rap session' and the board will be better and stronger and the party will go on in this particular laiving room.

    Rem

  8. #352
    Worst Behavior. reds44's Avatar
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    Re: Let's all take a deep breath (everyone please read)

    What if you don't give out positive rep points. Everyone starts at 0, and if you get bad rep you go into negatives. After a certain amount of time the negative rep doesn't count against you anymore. If you get a certain amount of negative reps then you are banned for a few days, then if you get more you are gone forever. This way you don't single out good posters, but you do bad ones.

    It would kind of take away ORG, but I dunno just throwing things out.
    Quote Originally Posted by PuffyPig View Post
    Let's face it, you mis-hit the bun with the mustard squirter, no one will really care.

  9. #353
    The wino and I know bucksfan's Avatar
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    Re: Let's all take a deep breath (everyone please read)

    I cannot add much unique to the those views already posted. However in the spirit of everyone sharing their thoughts on the state of redszone...

    1) I subscribe to the notion that it is Boss's and GIK's living room. If they wanted to ban the use of vowels tomorrow, that is their perogative.

    2) I really don;t pay any attention to the rep system. So please no one take offense that I have not given much. I just read the posts and I form my opinions. However it is a tough concept for me to grasp to essentially "rate" others' opinions. IMO the rep system could go away tomorrow and I'd never miss it.

    3) I don't care for the idea of a "dead horse" forum. One thing that makes me cringe is when someone fairly new posts something that I know many will consider to be something discussed ad nauseam in previous days/weeks/months/or even years. There is almost always some condescending remarks or even outright insults hurled their way for daring to bring up such a frequently discussed subject. I never understood this. Someone can be the smartest baseball person and biggest Reds fan in the world, find this site in his/her 20 mintues of internet time one night, and just make a post. Most people are not going to want to research a site, note tendencies and "rewarded behaviors', etc before posting. They are just happy to be at a place to discuss Reds baseball. I hardly psot or start a thread regarding Reds'specific info because I am sure it proabably has been discussed before and as much as I love the Reds AND this site, I don't have time or want to spend the time to search out if my topic has been addressed previously.

    4) Regarding the ORG forum, I thought it was an OK idea at the start but honeslty I could do without it also. I find myself rarely, if ever at all, recognizing what gforum I am browsing anyway. Sometimes I get confused if I read it in ORG or RL. I'd rather be exposed to all the posters in one forum.

    5) I have learned a ton here thanks primarily to Boss and GIK for providing this forum to begin with, and also to the many contributing posters, both past and present. Only real changes I would make honestly is to go back to how it was pre-ORG/rep as I don't know if it really helped anything other than to create a set of issues with rep points.

    6) Regarding any perceived or otherwise cliques- when you have a message board that has been in existence for this long and centers around an activity such as baseball, it is very reasonable to expect people will eventually meet and some will develop friendships. IMO that is to be expected and even helps strengthen the community as long as people are not so blinded by these relationships that they forget how to treat everyone else.

    Man, what is it - 12:20? I need to sleep...
    "I'm virtually free to do whatever I want, but I try to remember so is everybody else..." - Todd Snider

  10. #354
    Member Cedric's Avatar
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    Re: Let's all take a deep breath (everyone please read)

    Quote Originally Posted by bucksfan
    I cannot add much unique to the those views already posted. However in the spirit of everyone sharing their thoughts on the state of redszone...

    1) I subscribe to the notion that it is Boss's and GIK's living room. If they wanted to ban the use of vowels tomorrow, that is their perogative.

    2) I really don;t pay any attention to the rep system. So please no one take offense that I have not given much. I just read the posts and I form my opinions. However it is a tough concept for me to grasp to essentially "rate" others' opinions. IMO the rep system could go away tomorrow and I'd never miss it.

    3) I don't care for the idea of a "dead horse" forum. One thing that makes me cringe is when someone fairly new posts something that I know many will consider to be something discussed ad nauseam in previous days/weeks/months/or even years. There is almost always some condescending remarks or even outright insults hurled their way for daring to bring up such a frequently discussed subject. I never understood this. Someone can be the smartest baseball person and biggest Reds fan in the world, find this site in his/her 20 mintues of internet time one night, and just make a post. Most people are not going to want to research a site, note tendencies and "rewarded behaviors', etc before posting. They are just happy to be at a place to discuss Reds baseball. I hardly psot or start a thread regarding Reds'specific info because I am sure it proabably has been discussed before and as much as I love the Reds AND this site, I don't have time or want to spend the time to search out if my topic has been addressed previously.

    4) Regarding the ORG forum, I thought it was an OK idea at the start but honeslty I could do without it also. I find myself rarely, if ever at all, recognizing what gforum I am browsing anyway. Sometimes I get confused if I read it in ORG or RL. I'd rather be exposed to all the posters in one forum.

    5) I have learned a ton here thanks primarily to Boss and GIK for providing this forum to begin with, and also to the many contributing posters, both past and present. Only real changes I would make honestly is to go back to how it was pre-ORG/rep as I don't know if it really helped anything other than to create a set of issues with rep points.

    6) Regarding any perceived or otherwise cliques- when you have a message board that has been in existence for this long and centers around an activity such as baseball, it is very reasonable to expect people will eventually meet and some will develop friendships. IMO that is to be expected and even helps strengthen the community as long as people are not so blinded by these relationships that they forget how to treat everyone else.

    Man, what is it - 12:20? I need to sleep...
    I haven't been around much lately so I've missed most of this thread. I agree with what you say about the clique thing. I can't really understand how people wouldn't expect friendships to be developed over this long a time. I don't think the people that are always said to be in the "clique" are blinded by their relationships, but obviously they are going to have the same foundation of beliefs on things they see on the diamond, that's just common sense. That's what would help develop the strong friendship.

    This site can't be anywhere near perfect for new posters. It has to be intimidating on some level. Hopefully the new posters will realize how great this website is and will have the guts to stick around and fire away.

    Again, once people get involved and get into the flow of things they will appreciate criticism a little better and not take it personally.

    I think a key to getting more familiar with this site is learning your own personal flaws. I'm still sensitive about my opinions on the game and I know that I have trouble sometimes using the written word to convey my thoughts on the game of baseball. Some of what I see I can't describe in as perfect detail as other posters. This has helped me to learn how to step back and not try and force my opinion down others throats.

    This site will challenge you, you will NOT go without getting your feelings hurt or your ego bruised. Even the best have had it.
    This is the time. The real Reds organization is back.

  11. #355
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    Re: Let's all take a deep breath (everyone please read)

    It seems lioke an excellent forum for thought provoking theories

  12. #356
    Please come again pedro's Avatar
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    Re: Let's all take a deep breath (everyone please read)

    Although I have stated that I like the idea of the "dead horse" forums, I have to say that there are quite a few of us that I really respect that have given persuasive arguments against it as well.


    TMBS, I was also against the creation of the minor league forum and that seems to have worked out quite well so I guess I don't know what I'm trying to say.
    Get your nunchucks and the keys to your dad's car. I know where we can get a gun

  13. #357
    Maple SERP savafan's Avatar
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    Re: Let's all take a deep breath (everyone please read)

    While reading this entire thread, I have seen some ask what is a quality post. What kind of post will earn you positive rep points. I'd like to point out a few.

    Quote Originally Posted by Old Red Guard
    Might as well make my jaded commentary on this here thread which could be renamed "The Never Ending Story"

    People who don't think we're watching the greatest athletes in baseball history are just wrong - Reds Faithful

    Yep. Just about all the players from the 30s wouldn't do squat if they were transplanted into today's game as is. 20 year olds looked about 30, bodies were smaller overall, no one weight trained (Lord forbid that makes you musclebound don't you know). The most popular diet supplement was liquid malt barley in one form or 'nuther. Juiced meant a guy played better drunk, you slept on clanking, rocking, creaking trains and spent weeks on the road, living in pullman's and hotel rooms. Nutritional theory was the more fatty red meat the better and exercise was generally considered only in spring training if you weren't smart enough to get out of it then. If you pulled a muscle or tweaked a hammy you rubbed some homemade balm into it, gritted your teeth, shut your fool mouth and played the game. There was some kid playing out in the cornbelt who was hellbent to take your job and your boss was hellbent to give it to him if you faltered for a second. After all you were making 5 grand a year and he could pay that kid 1200 and a train ticket to do the same thing. You might be better but not if you're hurt - why give the kid any chance at showing his stuff. Keep playing. Sanitation was nonexistent. Well, okay, most guys washed their face once a day and a few bathed more than once a week, but only a few. Uniforms were worn until they could play the game by themselves. Don't tear it either - get a needle and darn it up - if the club has to buy another one for you before midpoint they'd deduct it from your check. Heck that's about 6 bottles of whiskey and a night with a Philly hooker! Players would have made good footballers though with all that weight. Wool uniforms full of sweat and 3 pounds of fermented dirt, heavy leather shoes with razored steel cleats, cotton unders and a patch of leather on your off-ham and you were playing with 20 pounds of itchy, scratchy, buggy, sometimes soggy, baggy mucilaginous fiber clinging to your every move. Compare that to today's featherweight outfits and shoes that weigh 6 ounces! Training equipment consisted of medicine balls, a big field and for pitchers, a wall to throw against. Knocking bottles off posts was a favorite way for kids to practice control, pitching off a concrete stoop and catching the rebounds, tossing at birds or rabbits and hitting rocks as far as you could were other disciplines of rigorous training. Stickball WAS great - it taught incredible bat control and concentration. You try hitting a small ball with a broomstick and see how well you do. Stickball in the streets is overlooked as a way to teach youngsters today. I'm seriuos. That's how I always coached my kids when I was involved in Pony baseball. I'd start out with stickball games and oven mitts for gloves. Bragging now but in twelve years coaching tykes we never once failed to win twice as many as we lost and a ton of my boys made allstar teams every year. Nothing special I did - just the stickball and oven mitts. Catch with an oven mitt and by gosh you WILL use 2 hands. Swing with a broomstick at a little rubber ball half the sizer of a baseball and by the time we played with real bats and balls and gloves the kids hardly missed anything. Easier to straighten out swings when they're hefting a broomstick, too. Helps them select the right weight bat, too. Most kids try to swing way too heavy. Anyway, drifting - back to former athletes.
    Today's players are far better athletes. Work regimens are religiously adhered to, scientific principles are utilized, professionals in kinesiology, nutrition, conditioning for specific functions, flexibility, even psychology are employed to help players train. In the 30s and 40s you were too busy at your 2nd job during the offseason to train much. During the season some guys main exercise consisted of bouncin a different Betty in every town you visited and brawling in saloons. There were lots of "good" guys, too, that had families and religion. They loafed around the hotel reading, writing letters and playing cards. Not every player was a hell-raiser but the ripsnorts probably got more exercise viz less sleep. Top it off with the fact that communicable diseases were widespread, nutrition from the cradle to grave was sometimes good but inconsistent. Food followed the economy - lots of people ate thin soup and litle else when times were slow. For lots of kids times was always slow. Then as now the greatest weapon against poverty was hard work but then as now there were lots of folk who ignored that fact. There was no foodstamps, no unemployment checks, no welfare boards to take up the slack for the children. If your parents were unlucky, or bums, or down and out, then you didn't eat much. You spent your hours in the streets, playing stickball, pitching against that stoop, playing burnout with your buddies and breathing, sleeping, dreaming baseball. Then you're 16 and good - you play on a town team or maybe a factory boss pays you 3 bucks a game to play on their team and gives your old man a job to boot. You learn the game the hard way against guys who'll spike you, crash into you, trip you and rag you unmercifully -nothing sacred, mothers not spared. You small and young and facing a hulk of a pitcher who throws 85 ( fast enough back then) and spits tobacco with every pitch. He's dug a rut 6 inches in front of the rubber, too and pitches from there - the umps are scared of him so who's going to stop him? You know you can't pull him so you slap at the ball and poke it into left with a bit of spin - the ball caroms off into foul gorund after striking fair and you run like a jackrabbit, skipping over the first baseman's extended foot, ducking the elbow aimed at your ribs the 2nd sacker points your way and you slide into third with your spikes up and slashing. Not trying to hurt the guy, just keeping him from getting close enough to stomp on you when he sweeps the tag.
    A couple years of this and a scout sees you and signs you for a ticket and fifty bucks and sends you to Red Oak, Iowa to play. You're 18 and weigh 140 sopping wet. Your face is drawn and you look 30 by today's standards but everyone in Red Oak calls you Cheeks because they think you have a "babyface". You're scrawny, undernourished, wiry strong but no one today would call you an athlete. Didn't then, either - you are a ballplayer. Big difference. Athletes are born - ballplayers are forged from runny gruel, concrete stoops, bouncing balls, broomsticks and hard knocks. You know all the dirty tricks - better known as essential survival techniques. At 21, you make the show. You do well, you're a 2nd baseman. You get on base any way you can, you holler at the pitcher, you steal when you can but only when its necessary. Go the other way, bunt, squeeze, and you've learned to swing from the heels when the pitcher is predictable. You use whatever you've been given, and you learn everything you can, every nuance possible. You are successful and your twetnies are golden years. Then you're 30. Within 2 or 3 years your career will be over. Your joints hurt, you've lost a couple of steps. You've played through aches and strains, and punished yourself for a decade to fend off the stream of prospects trying to unseat you. And now it happens. You're traded for no one inparticular to a terrible team. You play a couple years, your numbers aren't that bad but thwe little things are gone. You can't steal anymore, triples are doubles and doubles are singles and that kid up from Tuscaloosa that throws 92 just blows it by you. You retire at 33. You are old, ancient by baseball standards. You've never touched a weight set, never taken a vitamin or mineral supplement, never even heard of yoga or yogurt, never had a personal or team trainer, you have the beginnings of gout, and have had chicken pox, measles, mumps, rubella, and a variety of flus during your career. Mostly you played through it all and let your natural vitality cure it. You have a permanently bent finger from the time you broke it on a ball that jammed it, then you taped it, grimaced and played on. You have hammer toe because you played in second hand shoes for all those early years and the toe was too tight. You don't even know its why you couldn't run worth a damn anymore when you were just 30. You were a ballplayer. Now you're 33 and you're nothing. No job, no other skills, no player's association to write you a check. You take a job as a coach. You'll teach the same misguided theories and scoff at new advances in nutrition and training for years, delaying major advances in your sport until the mid to late 60s when rising salaries and advancing knowledge begins to change the way athletes take care of themselves and baseball begins to scout athletes for their potential instead of ballplayers for their skills. The theory is you can teach skills but you can't teach speed or genetics. In the back of my mind, this old man realizes they are right, but I miss the pure ballplayers. The ones who raised hell and tripped guys as they rounded second. The ones who took whatever you gave em and used it against you. When I was a child I watched ordinary men with extraordinary skills playing a game I loved. Today, I watch demi-gods of athleticism with lithe, muscular bodies play my beloved sport. The hope for the everyday joe, who works hard, who hones his skills fanatically, to play at the highest level, is almost gone. Yes, today's athletes are incredible and outclass their counterparts of yesteryear. They are not nearly as much fun to watch or follow.
    Quote Originally Posted by Stormy
    So many fallacies, misconceptions, and distortions, so little time. By definition, Adam Dunn is *never* "easy to approach" or an easy out, in any situation. You see, in 2005 in every situational batting condition, involving At Bats with baserunners On Base, Adam boasts a 500+OBP. Yes, 500+, which is staggering, when you consider the implications: When Adam strides to the plate with a runner anywhere on the basepaths, he's going to get a hit or walk better than 50% of the time. Likewise, he provides ample power in those same situations, with a Slugging% between .533-and-.615 in all baserunner involved Plate Appearances. In direct contrast to what you assert about Adam's At Bats with Runners On Base, even his Batting Average has increased with Runners On and RISP w/2 out, when compared to his Bases Empty BA (.267 versus .247).

    Contrary to what you say, in 2005, Adam's numbers are better across the board in situations where the basepaths are littered with runners. Even though he has been walked in 22 of his 66 TPA's with Runners On, due to the fear he instills in opposing pitchers who prefer to make use of his ill-advised placement in the #5 hole to pitch around him, Adam has managed *half* of his 16 total Extrabase Hits with Runners On. That's made more amazing by the fact that he has only HALF as many ABs with Runners On, as he does with the bases empty (yet another indicator of the misplacement of him in the lineup, for both OBP and SLG driven RBI reasons).

    As opposed to his 949 OPS with the Bases Empty, Adam has an epic OPS between 1110-and-1217 in each situation where Runners are On, RISP and RISP w/2 Out. And that's not generated by the misnomer "soft BB", as he absolutely mashes in those situations, as well. That's the opposite of what you indicate about Dunn's production/performance with Runners On. The fact that his K/AB ratio increases during those situational ABs, also indicates that, knowing he is often going to be pitched around with Runners On, at #5, with far lesser hitters behind him in the order, he's consciously willing to expand his zone some to try to drive in more Runs, which is probably counterproductive.

    You've chosen to make the youngest, most productive offensive player the Reds have had in recent history your personal whipping boy, providing no substantial evidence to support your contentions of personal whim, and without ever alluding to the inferior production of his elder, more expensive supporting cast, nor the league worst, historically bad rotation. It's a tired, personal vendetta... but the bright side is that with every post, you unwittingly use numbers which make a better and better case for Adam Dunn being the centerpiece of this franchise, one of the elite young producers in the game, and the only Reds player worthy of the #3 spot and long-term commitment. Well done, and thanks for making our case for us, so routinely, even as you fail to ever directly respond to posts/criteria which controvert your unsubstantiated instincts to the contrary.
    Quote Originally Posted by cincinnati chili
    I wanted to share with you all some old research I did about high school pitchers taken in the first round. Hopefully, this will give everyone a sense of how large the Reds' gamble was.

    Between 1990 and 1996, there were 40 high school pitchers taken in the first round. A total of $42.859 million was been spent on bonus money for these guys (of course the going rate is higher).

    - 27 out of the 40 (67.5%) pitchers were busts
    - 2 more (5%) will probably be busts
    - 1 (2.5%) is a horrible major league pitcher
    - 4 of them (10%) had a good year or so then flamed out with injuries
    - 4 of them (10%) are actually good major league pitchers
    - 1, and only 1 (2.5%), Kerry Wood, is an all-star quality player

    I've never seen Grueler pitch. But hopefully this will give some perspective on how big a gamble the Reds are taking.

    5 *Kurt Miller, rhp, Pirates 232,000 1990 bust
    9 *Ron Walden, lhp, Dodgers 215,000 1990 bust
    25 *Robbie Beckett, lhp, Padres 175,000 1990 bust
    1 *Brien Taylor, lhp, Yankees $1,550,000 1991 bust
    15 *Tyrone Hill, lhp, Brewers 280,000 1991 bust
    18 *Al Shirley, of, Mets 245,000 1991 bust
    22 *Brian Barber, rhp, Cardinals 200,000 1991 bust
    17 *Jim Pittsley, rhp, Royals 410,000 1992 bust
    26 *Dan Serafini, lhp, Twins 350,000 1992 bust
    8 *Kirk Presley, rhp, Mets 900,000 1993 bust
    13 *Matt Drews, rhp, Yankees 620,000 1993 bust
    15 *Jayson Peterson, rhp, Cubs 712,500 1994 bust
    16 *Matt Smith, lhp-1b, Royals 1,000,000 1994 bust
    27 *Jacob Shumate, rhp, Braves 500,000 1994 bust
    15 *Andy Yount, rhp, Red Sox 986,000 1995 bust
    16 *Joe Fontenot, rhp, Giants 900,000 1995 bust
    17 *Todd Noel, rhp, Cubs 900,000 1996 bust
    21 *Jake Westbrook, rhp, Rockies 750,000 1996 bust
    24 *Sam Marsonek, rhp, Rangers 834,000 1996 bust
    26 *Josh Garrett, rhp, Red Sox 665,000 1996 bust
    7 *Doug Million, lhp, Rockies 905,000 1994 Died tragically (asthma attack), but was awful in the minors and appeared to be a bust waiting to happen.
    5 *John Patterson, rhp, Expos/DBacks 6,075,000 1996 helped send the Dbacks toward bankrupcy
    7 *Matt White, rhp, Giants/DRays 10,200,000 1996 helped send the Drays toward bankrupcy
    12 *Bobby Seay, lhp, White Sox/DRays 3,000,000 1996 helped send the Drays toward bankrupcy
    22 *Tony McKnight, rhp, Astros 500,000 1995 net value was a rental of Mike Williams for the 2001 stretch run
    14 #*Todd Van Poppel, rhp, Athletics 500,000 1990 of no value to team that drafted him
    12 *Todd Ritchie, rhp, Twins 252,500 1990 released by team that drafted him before succeeding later
    5 *Kenny Henderson, rhp, Brewers Did not sign 1991 DNS
    30 *Nick Bierbrodt, lhp, Diamondbacks 1,046,000 1996 will probably be a bust
    22 *Gil Meche, rhp, Mariners 820,000 1996 will be a bust unless he recovers from injury
    28 *Jamey Wright, rhp, Rockies 395,000 1993 not a bust, but a bad major league starting pitcher. Doesn't throw strikes.
    23 *Jeff D'Amico, rhp, Brewers 525,000 1993 Dominant in 2000; worthless to Brewers in other years due to injury
    11 *Adam Eaton, rhp, Phillies 1,100,000 1996 looked very promising in short major league stint. Career may be over due to injury.
    10 *Jaret Wright, rhp, Indians 1,150,000 1994 Short, immediate success in majors before flaming out due to injury
    25 *Scott Elarton, rhp, Astros 750,000 1994 Short, immediate success in majors before flaming out due to injury
    17 *Roy Halladay, rhp, Blue Jays 895,000 1995 excellent pick
    15 *Chris Carpenter, rhp, Blue Jays 580,000 1993 middle of rotation starter; has pitched over 200 innings only once
    22 *Steve Karsay, rhp, Blue Jays 180,000 1990 success came near his free agent years
    11 *Shawn Estes, lhp, Mariners 332,500 1991 valuable major league player in his best years, despite walking many batters
    4 *Kerry Wood, rhp, Cubs 1,265,000 1995 worth every penny, even though he was of no use to the Cubs for 1.5 years due to injury
    Quote Originally Posted by Falls City Beer
    I'd wager my firstborn that Jimmy Haynes does not reach 14 wins.
    The last one is a personal favorite.
    My dad got to enjoy 3 Reds World Championships by the time he was my age. So far, I've only gotten to enjoy one. Step it up Redlegs!

  14. #358
    Member Spitball's Avatar
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    Apr 2000
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    5,622

    Re: Let's all take a deep breath (everyone please read)

    Quote Originally Posted by savafan
    While reading this entire thread, I have seen some ask what is a quality post. What kind of post will earn you positive rep points. I'd like to point out a few.

    The last one is a personal favorite.
    Nice.
    "I am your child from the future. I'm sorry I didn't tell you this earlier." - Dylan Easton

  15. #359
    The Lineups stink. KronoRed's Avatar
    Join Date
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    Re: Let's all take a deep breath (everyone please read)

    That's the real important issue.

    Did we ever get FCB's firstborn?
    Go Gators!

  16. #360
    Member klw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    New England
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    Re: Let's all take a deep breath (everyone please read)

    Quote Originally Posted by KronoRed
    That's the real important issue.

    Did we ever get FCB's firstborn?
    FCB's firstborn was sent to the Sons of Sam Horn for a 3 year old lefthander and a third born to be named later.


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