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Thread: Despite having TB, he flew to his wedding

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    2009: Fail Ltlabner's Avatar
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    Despite having TB, he flew to his wedding

    Man Boarded Airplane for Wedding, Honeymoon Despite TB Diagnosis
    Wednesday, May 30, 2007


    ATLANTA A man with a form of tuberculosis so dangerous he is under the first U.S. government-ordered quarantine since 1963 told a newspaper he took one trans-Atlantic flight for his wedding and honeymoon and another because he feared for his life.

    Hundreds of health authorities around the world are now scrambling to track down passengers who were seated near the man for testing, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Julie Gerberding said Wednesday.

    "There are two aspects to this," Gerberding said. "One is, is the patient himself highly infectious? Fortunately, in this case, he's probably not. But the other piece is this bacteria is a very deadly bacteria. We just have to err on the side of caution."

    Health officials said that the man had been advised not to fly and that he knew he could expose others when he boarded the jets from Atlanta to Paris, and later from Prague to Montreal.

    The man, however, told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that doctors didn't order him not to fly and only suggested he put off his long-planned wedding in Greece.

    He knew he had a form of tuberculosis and that it was resistant to first-line drugs, but he didn't realize it could be so dangerous, he said. "We headed off to Greece thinking everything's fine," said the man, who declined to be identified because of the stigma attached to his diagnosis.

    He flew to Paris on May 12 aboard Air France Flight 385. While in Europe, health authorities reached him with the news that further tests had revealed his TB was a rare, "extensively drug-resistant" form, far more dangerous than he knew. They ordered him into isolation, saying he should turn himself over to Italian officials.

    Instead, the man flew from Prague to Montreal on May 24 aboard Czech Air Flight 0104, then drove into the United States at the Champlain, N.Y., border crossing. He told the newspaper he was afraid that if he didn't get back to the U.S., he wouldn't get the treatment he needed to survive.

    He is now at Atlanta's Grady Memorial Hospital in respiratory isolation.

    CDC officials have recommended medical exams for cabin crew members and passengers who sat within two rows of the man on the flights.

    The other passengers are not considered at high risk of infection because tests indicated the amount of TB bacteria in the man was low, said Dr. Martin Cetron, director of the CDC's division of global migration and quarantine.

    But Gerberding noted that U.S. health officials have had little experience with the "extensively drug-resistant" form. It's possible it may have different transmission patterns, she said. Officials simply don't know yet.

    "We're thankful the patient was not in a highly infectious state, but we know the risk of transmission isn't zero, even with the fact that he didn't have symptoms and didn't appear to be coughing," Gerberding said on ABC's "Good Morning America."

    "We've got to really look at the people closest to him, get them skin tested."

    Dr. Howard Njoo of the Public Health Agency of Canada said it appeared unlikely that the man spread the disease on the flight into Canada. Still the agency was working with U.S. officials to contact passengers who sat near him.

    French health authorities have asked Air France-KLM for lists of all passengers seated within two rows of the infected man, a spokeswoman said Wednesday.

    Daniela Hupakova, a spokeswoman for the Czech airline CSA, said their flight crew underwent medical checks and are fine. The airline was contacting passengers and cooperating with Czech and foreign authorities, she said.

    The man told the Journal-Constitution he was in Rome during his honeymoon when the CDC told him to turn himself in to Italian authorities to be isolated and be treated. The CDC told him he couldn't fly aboard commercial airliners.

    "I thought to myself: You're nuts. I wasn't going to do that. They told me I had been put on the no-fly list and my passport was flagged," the man said.

    He told the paper he and his wife decided to sneak back into the U.S. via Canada. He said he voluntarily went to a New York hospital, then was flown by the CDC to Atlanta.

    He is not facing prosecution, health officials said.

    "I'm a very well-educated, successful, intelligent person," he told the paper. "This is insane to me that I have an armed guard outside my door when I've cooperated with everything other than the whole solitary-confinement-in-Italy thing."

    CDC officials told The Associated Press they could not immediately comment on the interview.

    Health officials said the man's wife tested negative for TB before the trip and is not considered a public health risk. They said they don't know how the Georgia man was infected.

    The quarantine order was the first since the government quarantined a patient with smallpox in 1963, according to the CDC.

    Tuberculosis is a disease caused by germs that are spread from person to person through the air. It usually affects the lungs and can lead to symptoms such as chest pain and coughing up blood. It kills nearly 2 million people each year worldwide.

    Because of antibiotics and other measures, the TB rate in the United States has been falling for years. Last year, it hit an all-time low of 13,767 cases, or about 4.6 cases per 100,000 Americans.

    Health officials worry about "multidrug-resistant" TB, which can withstand the mainline antibiotics isoniazid and rifampin. The man was infected with something even worse "extensively drug-resistant" TB, also called XDR-TB, which resists many drugs used to treat the infection.

    There have been 17 U.S. XDR-TB cases since 2000, according to CDC statistics.

    The highly dangerous form is "expanding around the world," particularly in South Africa, eastern Europe and the former states of the Soviet Union, he said.
    a super volcano of ridonkulous suckitude.

    I simply don't have access to a "cares about RBI" place in my psyche. There is a "mildly curious about OBI%" alcove just before the acid filled lake guarded by robot snipers with lasers which leads to the "cares about RBI" antechamber though. - Nate

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  3. #2
    2009: Fail Ltlabner's Avatar
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    Re: Despite having TB, he flew to his wedding

    Not sure how I feal about this whole thing. On the one hand, he was told that the TB wasn't that serrious and claims it was only a recomendation that he not fly.

    OTOH, his actions come off as very self-centered and I'm not sure I beleive his "aw shucks, I didn't know it was that serrious" routine.

    I don't know, maybe I'm being unfair, but this guy comes off like a real jerk IMO.
    a super volcano of ridonkulous suckitude.

    I simply don't have access to a "cares about RBI" place in my psyche. There is a "mildly curious about OBI%" alcove just before the acid filled lake guarded by robot snipers with lasers which leads to the "cares about RBI" antechamber though. - Nate

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    Churlish Johnny Footstool's Avatar
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    Re: Despite having TB, he flew to his wedding

    Unless the doctor forbid him to fly, I don't blame this guy. He probably had a lot of money and time invested in the wedding. If the physician didn't make the seriousness of his condition crystal-clear, I can understand how he wouldn't want to fly.

    Now, if the doctor told him he was a public health risk and he flew anyway, lock him up for reckless endangerment.
    "I prefer books and movies where the conflict isn't of the extreme cannibal apocalypse variety I guess." Redsfaithful

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    RZ Chamber of Commerce Unassisted's Avatar
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    Re: Despite having TB, he flew to his wedding

    So the CDC put him on the international no-fly list and they wanted to send a private jet for his return flight. Rather than be bothered with any of that, he flew commercial on the Czech airline back to Canada and drove across the border.
    Last edited by Unassisted; 05-30-2007 at 01:00 PM.
    /r/reds

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    Member Highlifeman21's Avatar
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    Re: Despite having TB, he flew to his wedding

    Just another reason not to fly Air France.

    You might catch TB.

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    Hisssssssss Yachtzee's Avatar
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    Re: Despite having TB, he flew to his wedding

    Oddly enough, I saw the title of this thread and wondered what exactly TeamBoone was doing with this groom before his wedding.
    Burn down the disco. Hang the blessed DJ. Because the music that he constantly plays, it says nothing to me about my life.

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    So long old friend rotnoid's Avatar
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    Re: Despite having TB, he flew to his wedding

    Sure this guy caught all kinds of grief from the world at large. But think of the hell he'd have taken from his wife if he missed the wedding.
    I'm just like everybody else. I have two arms, two legs and 4,000 hits."

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