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Thread: Favorite Commercials

  1. #16
    Mon chou Choo vaticanplum's Avatar
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    Re: Favorite Commercials

    This is probably my favorite commercial ever. It's not funny, but beautiful.

    60-second version:
    http://www.bravia-advert.com/commerc...acommhigh.html

    Extended version:
    http://www.bravia-advert.com/commerc...tcommhigh.html

    It's the damn stupid frog that gets me every time.

    I've always been a firm believer that everyone would benefit if artists took a different tack toward "selling out". If truly good artists were more willing to let their work be used in other mediums, even commercial ones, then commercialism could be more strongly infused with art and good obscure art would be a bigger part of the mainstream. Volkswagen has always been pretty good at doing this.
    There is no such thing as a pitching prospect.

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  3. #17
    Member dman's Avatar
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    Re: Favorite Commercials

    Monster.com's commercial from the 1999 Superbowl where the kids are saying things like "when I grow up I want to be a yes man" or "I want to work my way up to middle management".

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  5. #18
    Resident optimist OldRightHander's Avatar
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    Re: Favorite Commercials

    I've always kind of liked the career builder ones with the chimps.

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    Re: Favorite Commercials

    Quote Originally Posted by MrsHammer View Post
    For those of us who can't access youtube (stupid company firewall)...which commercial is this?

    My current fave is the Old Spice commercial with Bruce Campbell singing Duran Duran's "Hungry Like the Wolf". Of course, it could have something to do with being a big DD fan in my teen years.
    I guess everyone's going to keep it their little secret MrsHammer. I'd like to know too but as slow as my computer loads videos I'll probably see the commercial twice on TV while waiting on it to load from youtube.

  7. #20
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    Re: Favorite Commercials

    I've been a big fan of the Vault commericals lately, particularly the one where the dad clears out his backyard and the backyards of like 4 neighbors to give his son 50 yards to throw a football.

    Also a huge fan of the one where the guy builds the scarecrow to guard his crop. Especially against hippies.

  8. #21
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    Re: Favorite Commercials

    Quote Originally Posted by vaticanplum View Post
    This is probably my favorite commercial ever. It's not funny, but beautiful.

    60-second version:
    http://www.bravia-advert.com/commerc...acommhigh.html

    Extended version:
    http://www.bravia-advert.com/commerc...tcommhigh.html

    It's the damn stupid frog that gets me every time.
    That is a great commercial. It really stands out.
    My favorite is the Nike "move" commercial from the 2002 Salt Lake Olympics - I'm sure you recall it. My favorite part is the editing from the long jumper, to the little boy jumping backward on his parent's bed, to the snowboarder, to the skateboarder:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G4Yn9eWgNmk
    Last edited by Betterread; 06-10-2007 at 10:50 PM.

  9. #22
    Mon chou Choo vaticanplum's Avatar
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    Re: Favorite Commercials

    Quote Originally Posted by Betterread View Post
    That is a great commercial. It really stands out.
    My favorite is the Nike "move" commercial from the 2002 Salt Lake Olympics - I'm sure you recall it. My favorite part is the editing from the long jumper, to the little boy jumping backward on his parent's bed, to the snowboarder, to the skateboarder:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G4Yn9eWgNmk
    That was great. I had actually never seen that -- I was out of the country and missed that whole Olympics -- so thanks for the link. Good sports commercials tend to get to me, unsurprisingly.

    I know very little about advertising, and that commercial makes me wonder how much money has to go into something like that. Maybe MWM or somebody can elaborate -- have these things gotten easier to make with the advent of computers and so on? Or does it really take somebody like Nike to make a commercial like that? It looks like there are about sixty eleven thousand shots in that commercial.
    There is no such thing as a pitching prospect.

  10. #23
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    Re: Favorite Commercials

    Quote Originally Posted by vaticanplum View Post
    That was great. I had actually never seen that -- I was out of the country and missed that whole Olympics -- so thanks for the link. Good sports commercials tend to get to me, unsurprisingly.

    I know very little about advertising, and that commercial makes me wonder how much money has to go into something like that. Maybe MWM or somebody can elaborate -- have these things gotten easier to make with the advent of computers and so on? Or does it really take somebody like Nike to make a commercial like that? It looks like there are about sixty eleven thousand shots in that commercial.
    Information on the making of this commercial:

    Directed by Jake Scott of RSA, Los Angeles, "Move" connects more than 20 different sports via common human body movements. Through the spot, the camera tracks each athlete; the edits cut from one jock to the next, transitioning when they share similar body positions. Copywriters on "Move" were Mike Byrne and Kash Sree; creative director Hal Curtis art directed, working with creative director Carlos Bayala and agency producer Vic Palumbo. Teresa Lutz handled business affairs for W+K. Adam Pertofsky of Rock Paper Scissors, Los Angeles cut "Move;" Max Malkin was DP.
    The spot begins with a teen sprinting into the suburban setting, then looking back over his shoulder, a move which triggers the move-to-move athletic oneness communicated by the spot. Both Nike-sponsored and amateur talent demonstrate the commonality of athletics; some Nike athletes featured in the spot include A.J. Mleczko, Landon Donovan, Luis da Silva, Jr., Vince Carter, Lottie Aston, Savante Stringfellow, Barrett Christy, Picabo Street, Apolo Ohno and Lindsay Davenport. Sports played include gymnastics, skateboarding, base jumping and Frisbee.
    "The idea is sport is a shared experienced. You can be a professional athlete like Vince Carter or a peewee football player and it doesn't really matter. We wanted to demonstrate that why and how you move translates from sport to sport and athlete to athlete," says Curtis.
    "Our intention was for it to be a celebration of all the different kinds of sports and athletes. Nike is perceived as a core sport brand for football, basketball, baseball and soccer. Showing other sports and stretching that is a good thing strategically."
    The spot was filmed in California and Colorado. Curtis describes the spot as "difficult to execute."
    "When you look at the spot you'll see scenes hook up perfectly, and as it flows, you understand the point. Further in, it loosens up and we are not as literal. It's more about shared movements as opposed to body positions."
    Byrne, one of two copywriters, says the creative team avoided the now cliche slow motion sports footage for fast paced real time shots; the hectic rate of transitions is broken up by longer sequences including a base jump and an elaborate triathlon scene; similarly some of Byrne's own video game golfing technique found a home within the spot.
    "I am really happy with it. The spot really starts picking up and then you get lulled into the transitions. Also, we came across music that actually supported the transitions. For a while we looked at music that punctuates the visuals," says Byrne. "When we got a nice cut together, we tried other music on that . [Jonathan Elias] wrote this piano piece that carries it along and kind of reminds me of the theme from Chariots of Fire."
    "Move" was the culmination of a seven-day shoot and will ultimately be cut into 60 second and 30 second commercials.
    "We told Nike that there should be some eight-year-old kid in Biloxi Mississippi who wants to be a dancer and watches this spot and feels they have something in common with the football player," says Byrne. "It was a simple ambitious idea and we had all the right people together so it came out really well in the end."
    Also on tap on the post production front was Santa Monica's A52; the A52 team included producer Leighton Greer, Inferno artist Patrick Murphy and Flame artist Cari Chadwick.

  11. #24
    Hot Stove Season HotCorner's Avatar
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    Re: Favorite Commercials

    I like the Haggar "Making Things Right" commercials.

    http://www.haggar.com/gs/ads.html

    They have some new ones that aren't on the site that are pretty good too like the cable repairman one.

  12. #25
    Puffy's Daddy Red Leader's Avatar
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    Re: Favorite Commercials

    Quote Originally Posted by Red Leader View Post
    My favorite commercial is the two birds sitting outside on a branch at the back of the house. The home owner goes to answer the door and the birds shut the sliding glass door and then laugh hysterically when the home owner walks right into the sliding glass door. It's a Windex commercial, and it's hilarious.
    Here is the youtube link to the commercial I was talking about...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oF7hwBbxpiM
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  13. #26
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    Re: Favorite Commercials

    I think its a Geico commercial where the 2 squirrels ,ake a guy wreck his car, then high 5 each other.

    I also liked the "All Night Long" commercial with the animals... I know...shoot me. Cant help it.
    L.A. manager Grady Little had a bad feeling about Wednesday's game when he saw Harang and pitching coach Dick Pole walking in after Harang's warmup.

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  14. #27
    You know his story Redsland's Avatar
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    Re: Favorite Commercials

    Quote Originally Posted by vaticanplum View Post
    This is probably my favorite commercial ever. It's not funny, but beautiful.

    60-second version:
    http://www.bravia-advert.com/commerc...acommhigh.html

    Extended version:
    http://www.bravia-advert.com/commerc...tcommhigh.html

    It's the damn stupid frog that gets me every time.

    I've always been a firm believer that everyone would benefit if artists took a different tack toward "selling out". If truly good artists were more willing to let their work be used in other mediums, even commercial ones, then commercialism could be more strongly infused with art and good obscure art would be a bigger part of the mainstream. Volkswagen has always been pretty good at doing this.
    Great commercial. It's been cleaning up at all the advertising awards shows for the past year or so. Fallon's London branch was the agency, MJZ was the production company, and Nicholai Fuglsig was the director.

    Most people assume that some or all of the rubber balls were actually CGI, but they weren't. Thousands and thousands of them were actually dumped down the streets of San Francisco. A few of the shots were added in post-production, though, like the frog.

    FYI, the Volkswagen work is done by Arnold Worldwide, in Boston. You certainly have a good eye for advertising because, like the Bravia spot you identified, Arnold's Volkswagen work is universally hailed as outstanding at every awards show worldwide, year in and year out.

    As to your point about selling out, advertising at its best is nothing less than commercial art. Commercial, yes, but art nonetheless.

    Like this one, for example.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
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  15. #28
    Puffy's Daddy Red Leader's Avatar
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    Re: Favorite Commercials

    Quote Originally Posted by Ludwig Reds Fan View Post
    I think its a Geico commercial where the 2 squirrels ,ake a guy wreck his car, then high 5 each other.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aB4AXOioCOU

    I like that one, too. I'm a sucker for funny animal commercials.
    'When I'm not longer rapping, I want to open up an ice cream parlor and call myself Scoop Dogg.'
    -Snoop on his retirement

    Your Mom is happy.

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    redsfandan (07-06-2013)

  17. #29
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    Re: Favorite Commercials

    Terry Tate. Office linebacker.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ei7RuxX8u24
    When all is said and done more is said than done.

  18. #30
    You know his story Redsland's Avatar
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    Re: Favorite Commercials

    Quote Originally Posted by vaticanplum View Post
    I know very little about advertising, and that commercial makes me wonder how much money has to go into something like that. Maybe MWM or somebody can elaborate -- have these things gotten easier to make with the advent of computers and so on? Or does it really take somebody like Nike to make a commercial like that? It looks like there are about sixty eleven thousand shots in that commercial.
    Money-wise, a spot like that is enormously expensive. As you noted, it has many individual shots, each of which required a separate shoot, most of which are on-location, and each of which required a full shooting crew that was shooting unique talent, each of whom had to be cast separately and each of whom had to be paid scale.

    Before shooting ever occurred, the entire spot had to be storyboarded in intricate detail, to ensure the transitions were as seamless as possible. And, of course, a top-flight director had to be lined up, and they aren't free.

    Due to the large number of shots in this spot, and the fact that they had to be spliced together just-so for maximum effect, this spot would have spent a lot more time in post-production than is the norm. That would add expense, as would acquiring the rights to the music. So, figure Nike spent maybe (ballparking here) $2-5 million getting the spot produced. After all that, Nike still had to buy the air time.

    Yes, computers have made things easier. They have compressed the amount of time necessary to produce advertising, and they have opened up possibilities that never existed before, like talking geckos and the like. They make it possible to make changes on the fly that previously would have rendered shots unusable. When combined with digital cameras, they can give you the ability to review shots right on the set, rather than wait for film to be developed, which speeds things up by eliminating re-shoots. And they've driven some of the post-production costs down by allowing more players to get into the field. At the same time, there are "elite" post houses, and those are the ones that tend to do the kinds of spots under discussion here, and the elite players in any field are going to cost a premium.

    As for your final question, there are some brands that handle their advertising in-house. Gap is one of them. But most brands farm their advertising to one or more advertising agencies. Generally the quality of the work and the quality of the ideas driving the work are better when you use an agency, since these folks are experts at that sort of thing.

    And of course, money is a factor. The "Move" concept could conceivably have been pitched to any sporting goods company whose products are used in multiple sports. But could Easton, for example, have afforded to produce the spot? If not, it would merely have been another great idea for an ad that died on the vine in a board room.
    Makes all the routine posts.


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