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Thread: Who should be the next Manager?

  1. #121
    Making sense of it all Matt700wlw's Avatar
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    Re: Ken Macha in the mix for Reds manager?

    Quote Originally Posted by jojo View Post
    Until the roster improves, Moses couldn't lead this team to the promised land.

    Moses maybe...



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  3. #122
    Haunted by walks
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    Re: Ken Macha in the mix for Reds manager?

    Quote Originally Posted by wheels View Post
    That was Art Howe.
    Yes you're right. Thanks. I feel better about the possibility now.

  4. #123
    breath westofyou's Avatar
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    Re: Ken Macha in the mix for Reds manager?

    Quote Originally Posted by wheels View Post
    That was Art Howe.
    True, but Macha bristled under the Beane leadership too, Beane wants the manager to execute his vision to the absolute micro level. Most organizations have the macro determined with the micro being more flexible. Beane wants and has more input to the lineups and such. In the mid 50's Hank Greenberg was teh GM of the Indians and he chased Al Lopez to the White Sox by demanding pretty much what Beane does today.

  5. #124
    Ripsnort wheels's Avatar
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    Re: Ken Macha in the mix for Reds manager?

    Quote Originally Posted by westofyou View Post
    True, but Macha bristled under the Beane leadership too, Beane wants the manager to execute his vision to the absolute micro level. Most organizations have the macro determined with the micro being more flexible. Beane wants and has more input to the lineups and such. In the mid 50's Hank Greenberg was teh GM of the Indians and he chased Al Lopez to the White Sox by demanding pretty much what Beane does today.

    I've always been in favor of that.

    A GM has a vision, a reason for bringing in the players and if they aren't used properly, that vision can be wrecked.

    I wouldn't trust anyone with my vision, especially when my job is on the line. If the manager doesn't like it, there's the door.
    "We know we're better than this, but we can't prove it." - Tony Gwynn

  6. #125
    Charlie Brown All-Star IslandRed's Avatar
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    Re: Ken Macha in the mix for Reds manager?

    Quote Originally Posted by wheels View Post
    I've always been in favor of that.

    A GM has a vision, a reason for bringing in the players and if they aren't used properly, that vision can be wrecked.

    I wouldn't trust anyone with my vision, especially when my job is on the line. If the manager doesn't like it, there's the door.
    I can see that. I can also see the manager saying "if you want to make all the decisions, then put on the uniform and make them." It's a tough call. You've got to have a guy that will execute your vision. But thinking about the NFL, is there a coach worth his salt who would let the GM meddle in the Xs and Os? Can a team respect a manager if he's just a puppet who has to check everything with his boss first?

    I liked Tim Green's analogy in his book "Dark Side of the Game." He compared a team to a restaurant and the owner/GM/coach to the owner/manager/chef. If the guy who decides what type of food it will serve and the guy who shops for the food and the guy who cooks the food aren't all on the same page, the place is doomed.

    So to me, the key isn't for the GM to do the manager's job for him, it's to have the shared vision of what you're trying to accomplish.
    Not all who wander are lost

  7. #126
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    Re: Ken Macha in the mix for Reds manager?

    In a world where masculinity is often judged by your stubbornness in matters of compliance, Macha might be the man to stand up to Wayne's stupidity and tell him what he's doing wrong.

    I don't know: just thinking out loud. Perhaps the problem is that Wayne has too many yes-men who cave to his obviously very wrong instincts too often. Maybe Macha is smart enough to school him. I doubt it, but it's possible. And if Wayne is being kept around, I want him being as well-informed as he can be.

  8. #127
    Five Tool Fool jojo's Avatar
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    Re: Ken Macha in the mix for Reds manager?

    Quote Originally Posted by Falls City Beer View Post
    In a world where masculinity is often judged by your stubbornness in matters of compliance, Macha might be the man to stand up to Wayne's stupidity and tell him what he's doing wrong.

    I don't know: just thinking out loud. Perhaps the problem is that Wayne has too many yes-men who cave to his obviously very wrong instincts too often. Maybe Macha is smart enough to school him. I doubt it, but it's possible. And if Wayne is being kept around, I want him being as well-informed as he can be.
    I really think the Reds FO has a culture where being a baseball guy gets you way too much slack on your rope. It's kind of a fraternity mentality where being a brother counts a little more than what you bring to the table.
    "This isnít stats vs scouts - this is stats and scouts working together, building an organization that blends the best of both worlds. This is the blueprint for how a baseball organization should be run. And, whether the baseball men of the 20th century like it or not, this is where baseball is going."---Dave Cameron, U.S.S. Mariner

  9. #128
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    Re: Ken Macha in the mix for Reds manager?

    True, but Macha bristled under the Beane leadership too, Beane wants the manager to execute his vision to the absolute micro level. Most organizations have the macro determined with the micro being more flexible. Beane wants and has more input to the lineups and such. In the mid 50's Hank Greenberg was teh GM of the Indians and he chased Al Lopez to the White Sox by demanding pretty much what Beane does today.
    Differnce being Hank Greenburg may have been the worst GM of all time while Beane is one of the best. From looking at the history books and such -it appears Greenburg shot himself through the foot many times.

  10. #129
    breath westofyou's Avatar
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    Re: Ken Macha in the mix for Reds manager?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cooper View Post
    Differnce being Hank Greenburg may have been the worst GM of all time while Beane is one of the best. From looking at the history books and such -it appears Greenburg shot himself through the foot many times.
    Worst?

    Code:
    1950	Cleveland Indians	AL	154	92	62	.597	6.0	4	Lou Boudreau	
    1951	Cleveland Indians	AL	154	93	61	.604	5.0	2	Al Lopez	
    1952	Cleveland Indians	AL	154	93	61	.604	2.0	2	Al Lopez	
    1953	Cleveland Indians	AL	154	92	62	.597	8.5	2	Al Lopez	
    1954	Cleveland Indians	AL	154	111	43	.721	-	1	Al Lopez	Lost World Series (Giants)
    1955	Cleveland Indians	AL	154	93	61	.604	3.0	2	Al Lopez	
    1956	Cleveland Indians	AL	154	88	66	.571	9.0	2	Al Lopez	
    1957	Cleveland Indians	AL	153	76	77	.497	21.5	6	Kerby Farrell	
    1961	Chicago White Sox	AL	162	86	76	.531	23.0	4	Al Lopez

  11. #130
    This one's for you Edd Heath's Avatar
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    Re: Ken Macha in the mix for Reds manager?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cooper View Post
    Differnce being Hank Greenburg may have been the worst GM of all time while Beane is one of the best. From looking at the history books and such -it appears Greenburg shot himself through the foot many times.
    It's not Hank's fault he was in the same league as the Yankees.

    But he was no Oscar Vitt.
    Some people play baseball. Baseball plays Jay Bruce.

  12. #131
    Member paulrichjr's Avatar
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    Re: Who should be the next Manager?

    I sometimes read posts in the Sun Deck and there has been a discussion going on about Larussa and Jocketty coming here at the end of the season. I thought this was interesting and is semi-related to that.


    http://insider.espn.go.com/espn/blog...2=stateChanged
    • Tony La Russa has been manager of the Cardinals for 12 years, and St. Louis chairman Bill DeWitt noted over the phone Tuesday that his contracts have been neat and consistent -- three-year deals, four of them. "Every time his contract has been in its last year, I've asked him -- how about a renewal?" DeWitt said. "And every time, he's said, 'You know, I'm going to wait until the end of the season. I think he just doesn't like doing a deal in advance. ... I'd like to do a deal with him now."

    But DeWitt understands, and says he will talk to La Russa at season's end, again. "If he says he's fired up to come back, we'll negotiate an extension," said DeWitt. "This is a Hall of Fame manager. His record speaks for itself. ... He's been extremely important. His biggest asset is getting players to play as hard as they can. He's got this motto that you play nine innings every night, and good things happen."
    Tim McCarver: Baseball Quotes
    I remember one time going out to the mound to talk with Bob Gibson. He told me to get back behind the batter, that the only thing I knew about pitching was that it was hard to hit.

  13. #132
    Member paulrichjr's Avatar
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    Re: Who should be the next Manager?

    I want to go on record AGAIN that I do not want Girardi anywhere near this team.

    http://insider.espn.go.com/espn/blog...name=neyer_rob

    Managers should know the rulesposted: Thursday, August 30, 2007 | Feedback | Print Entry

    Yes, the Yankees swept the Red Sox. More on that -- and all the rest of the big games this week -- tomorrow.

    At the moment I want to talk about Joe Girardi.

    Girardi's currently serving as one of the Yankees' many TV analysts. By my count, there are seven of them, which has to be some sort of all-time record. What's more, most of them are truly excellent. In addition to Girardi, my favorite, Al Leiter, John Flaherty and Paul O'Neill all are solid (Leiter's better than solid, actually), and Ken Singleton has a million stories to tell.

    Today, in the bottom of the fifth inning, this exchange came after Robinson Cano hit his second home run of the afternoon:

    Michael Kay: One of the big knocks against Robinson Cano, for the first couple of years, has been his lack of production in day games. And that's changing with these two home runs today. And that's something that Jeter really rides him about.

    Girardi: That's a small sample. When you hit well, they're always going to find an area where you don't hit as well as you have in the past. But it's a fairly small sample. Some guys are just better nighttime hitters. There's no doubt about it.
    Actually, Cano's never showed any particular lack of production in day games. As a rookie in 2005, he played just slightly worse in day games than night games. In 2006, he was significantly better in day games. It's not until this year that he's struggled in day games, with a .721 OPS in 187 plate appearances (before today).

    You know what, though? Girardi's right: That is a small sample. Of course, we can't know the depth of Girardi's understanding of statistical significance. But just a passing familiarity is something you like to see in a future manager, and Girardi will manage again someday.

    In the top of the seventh, Kevin Youkilis ran far out of the baseline to avoid Alex Rodriguez's tag, but for some reason, Youkilis wasn't called out. After a conference among the umpires, Youkilis was finally called out, which essentially short-circuited the Red Sox's best chance to score all afternoon, and brought Terry Francona out of the dugout to argue (and then get ejected).

    To Girardi's credit, while all this was going on he said, "I gotta tell you, Michael. I don't know the rule. I'm not going to sit here and try to make something up."

    The rule is fairly clear: Any runner is out when "he runs more than three feet away from a direct line between bases to avoid being tagged unless his action is to avoid interference with a fielder fielding a batted ball."

    Youkilis just as clearly deserved to be out. My guess is that the umpires knew the rule, were not immediately sure if it applied in this particular case. If one of them did not know the rule, he didn't belong on the field. Frankly, I don't think the same applies to the broadcast booth. Or (fortunately for me and most of my colleagues) the press box. But what about a manager? Shouldn't a manager know the rules, cold?

    Girardi's obviously an intelligent guy, and I don't doubt that he knows his baseball. But before I hired him to manage my team, I'd ask him to brush up on the rulebook. Because if there's one guy other than the umpires who should know the rules, it's the manager.
    Tim McCarver: Baseball Quotes
    I remember one time going out to the mound to talk with Bob Gibson. He told me to get back behind the batter, that the only thing I knew about pitching was that it was hard to hit.

  14. #133
    Please come again pedro's Avatar
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    Re: Who should be the next Manager?

    lemmy.
    Get your nunchucks and the keys to your dad's car. I know where we can get a gun

  15. #134
    Rally Onion! Chip R's Avatar
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    Re: Who should be the next Manager?

    Here's an article from BP that doesn't give Mackanin an endorsement but it doesn't shoot him down either. It's basically wondering if he'll be back

    http://www.baseballprospectus.com/ar...articleid=6673

    In the Interim
    Pete Mackanin's Second Chance

    by John Perrotto

    Pete Mackanin virtually spent a lifetime in the minor leagues waiting for a chance to manage in the major leagues, logging 1,766 games in 13 seasons as a skipper down on the farm. Now, Mackanin is Cincinnati’s interim manager, taking over July 1 after Jerry Narron was fired when the Reds got off to a 31-51 start. The Reds have gone 31-26 since the switch, and even got within 6 ½ games of the National League Central lead, until the current skid of seven losses in nine games dropped them from the fringe of contention. Still, not too shabby, considering that the Reds were a season-worst 16 ½ games behind when Mackanin took over.

    While Mackanin is still waiting to see whether he will get the job on a permanent basis, all those years in the minor leagues obviously sharpened his sense of humor. When asked if he thought he might be the National League Manager of the Year for guiding the Reds from oblivion all the way to being within shouting distances of the division leaders, Mackanin didn’t miss a beat. “I think I’m going to be Interim Manager of the Year,” Mackanin said. “I think I’m going to win it, I really do.” Of course, Mackanin is the only interim manager in the major leagues at the moment. Baltimore’s Dave Trembley initially had that title when he was promoted from bullpen coach to manager on June 18 after the Orioles fired Sam Perlozzo. However, Trembley was named the permanent manager on August 22, at which point the Orioles promptly lost 30-3 to the Texas in the first game of a doubleheader that night to launch a nine-game losing streak. Similarly, although Seattle’s John McLaren was promoted from bench coach when Mariners manager Mike Hargrove shockingly resigned July 1, he was not given the interim tag, even though his contract only goes through the end of this season.

    “I guess you can look at it as somewhat of an awkward situation, but I don’t,” said Mackanin, who was serving as the Reds’ advance scout when Narron was axed. “I’m not trying to do anything differently than I would if I didn’t have 'interim' in front of my name. I’m just doing what it takes to win as many ballgames as possible and keep the organization on the right track, just like any other manager would. I don’t think you can do this job any other way.”

    If nothing else, Mackanin has given those in decision-making positions something to think about when it comes time to pick a permanent manager. While it was once thought that Reds owner Bob Castellini would look to bring in a high-profile manager, unless Tony La Russa does not return to St. Louis next season, that could be changing. “All of us have been impressed with Pete,” Castellini said. “He has a nice way about him. He communicates well with the players.”

    Mackanin is someone who immediately makes those around him feel comfortable. However, he also has the innate ability to draw a line, and his players know not the cross it. “I love the guy, and I think everyone in clubhouse loves the guy,” Reds left fielder Adam Dunn said. “He just has a great way of making everyone relax. He’s a funny guy and he keeps things loose, but he’s not the type of guy you’re going to walk all over. We know he is in charge and we respect that. It’s not like we’re looking at him as the substitute teacher and we’re just having fun until the regular teacher comes back.”

    “I hate making excuses and I hate blaming the manager, but there was kind of a negative haze here,” Reds first baseman Scott Hatteberg said. “Pete is much more upbeat. He tries to be around and keep guys loose. He's preaching a fun, more optimistic atmosphere, and I think guys appreciate it.”

    While the Orioles moved to give Trembley a one-year contract extension through 2008 with a club option for 2009, there is no indication the Reds will make a decision on Mackanin until the end of the season. “It’s two completely different situations,” Mackanin said. “I don’t think what happened with Trembley in Baltimore can hurt me, but I don’t know if it will help me.”

    What would really help Mackanin is some decent pitching. The Reds have allowed 5.36 runs a game, 15th in the 16-team NL, ahead of only Florida (5.40). Aaron Harang has proven to be the worth the four-year, $36.5-million contract he received in the offseason, as he has been the Reds’ only consistent starting pitcher; his 5.3 SNLVAR ranks eighth in the NL. Bronson Arroyo was expected to be a co-ace after signing a two-year, $25-million contract extension in the offseason that carries through 2010; although effective (he has a 3.2 SNLVAR), it's something less than they expected after his 2006 season. Nobody else in the rotation is above 1.2. Likewise, the bullpen really only has one member that it can count on, closer David Weathers. His 3.495 WXRL ranks ninth in the NL, but he's also the only Reds’ pitcher among the top 50.

    The Reds’ offense is among the best in the NL as it ranks fourth with an average of 4.86 runs a game, but much of that is the product of a hitter-friendly ballpark; as a team, they rate a much more mediocre eighth in team Equivalent Average. Dunn (39.0 VORP) and right fielder Ken Griffey Jr. (37.5) are leading the way, while second baseman Brandon Phillips (30.8), Hatteberg (25.7), and center fielder Josh Hamilton (22.7) have also been significant contributors. Though General Manager Wayne Krivsky has been much maligned for some of his moves, he picked Phillips off the scrap heap in a minor trade with Cleveland, and signed Hatteberg as a low-cost free agent. He also gambled on getting Hamilton through the Rule 5 Draft, though he had not played at all from 2003-05 while battling drug addiction, and had only appeared in 15 short-season A-ball-level games at Hudson Valley last year before having knee surgery.

    However, Krivsky hasn’t been quite as adept at acquiring pitchers, though he did get Arroyo from Boston in a trade for outfielder Wily Mo Pena last year. “There is no doubt we can hit with anybody in the league,” Reds catcher David Ross said. “We can outscore teams on any given night, but it’s tough to try outscore teams every game. We have the makings of a good pitching staff, but we need more depth.”

    Mackanin echoes those thoughts and has confidence Krivsky can fill the pitching holes in the offseason to make the Reds competitive next year. However, Mackanin wonders if he will be around next season to see it. Mackanin also served as Pittsburgh’s interim manager in the final weeks of the 2005 season after Lloyd McClendon was fired, and although he led the Pirates to a 12-14 record, he was not asked to interview for the permanent job, which instead went to Jim Tracy. While it may not seem like much, Mackanin’s .462 winning percentage is the best by a Pirates manager since Chuck Tanner left for Atlanta after the 1985 season.

    “It's hard to pursue this job because there's so much politics involved and so much else involved in it, but that being the case, I'm thrilled even to be doing this,” Mackanin said. “If this is the extent of it, I'm extremely happy because I’d like to think I’ve helped make at least something of a difference. “I'd certainly like to have a chance to take a club from the first day through a whole season, but it's out of my hands.”

    John Perrotto is an author of Baseball Prospectus. You can contact John by clicking here or click here to see John's other articles.
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