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Thread: Genealogy

  1. #31
    My clutch is broken RichRed's Avatar
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    Re: Genealogy

    My grandfather worked for the Minnesota Twins in the PR department. No truth to the rumor that Krivsky tried to sign him for the Reds bullpen.
    "I can make all the stadiums rock."
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  3. #32
    Administrator GIK's Avatar
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    Re: Genealogy

    Quote Originally Posted by RFS62 View Post
    "execute the construction"..... is that like, oh, say... build?


    You talk purty
    Yes. He was a 'master builder'.

  4. #33
    Member klw's Avatar
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    Re: Genealogy

    One of my father's cousins was able to trace one side of our family tree back to Cunedda. (b 386) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cunedda In resonse to the earlier question about why do people always seem to be related to someone famous, I have to answer that most people if you go out far enough can claim someone as a 12th cousin 4 times removed and that is more exciting than saying a have a great grandfather called Edward who was a ship's captain. Plus we often know more about famous people so once you can trace to them their lineage may be known and that fills in gaps.

  5. #34
    Mon chou Choo vaticanplum's Avatar
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    Re: Genealogy

    Quote Originally Posted by GIK View Post
    Yes. He was a 'master builder'.
    Or a master construction executioner.
    There is no such thing as a pitching prospect.

  6. #35
    Rally Onion! Chip R's Avatar
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    Re: Genealogy

    Quote Originally Posted by GAC View Post
    I had one too.

    Unfortunately, he got accidently shot/killed by his own men.

    Knowing you, that's not a shocker. :
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  7. #36
    Vampire Weekend @Bernie's camisadelgolf's Avatar
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    Re: Genealogy

    The only two celebrities in my family tree of which I'm aware are Ty Cobb and Chris O'Donnell.

  8. #37
    Rally Onion! Chip R's Avatar
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    Re: Genealogy

    Quote Originally Posted by vaticanplum View Post
    Why are people always distantly related to famous and historically signficant figures?

    ANNIE:
    ...so you see in a former lifetime I'm sure that I was Alexandria, the
    Czarette of Russia? What do you think?


    CRASH:
    How come in former lifetimes, everybody was someone famous? How come nobody ever says they were Joe Schmo?

    ANNIE:
    (laughing) It doesn't work like that.
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  9. #38
    Redsmetz redsmetz's Avatar
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    Re: Genealogy

    I'm not sure how I missed this thread when it first came up, but I've worked on my genealogy since I was in college in the 1970's. I agree with the poster who talked about how to get started and there are so many more resources than there were even a handful of years ago.

    I started on my dad's side and wrote my great aunt, then in her late 70's and she wrote out for me the info about her immediate family (she was my grandpa's sister) and then her father's family. I am now dismayed that stupid, young, sexist me didn't ask one question about her mother's family. I've since piece together some info, but it's been far more arduous with her historical memory gone.

    Actually when I started in 1974, I basically tracked down the descendants of my great-grandpa's siblings. I came to learn that out of four Metz sons that came over, my siblings and I are the only ones with the Metz name anymore. My mom had as many boys (six) as any generation of the Metzes in that line. If you're a Zimmer or a Rademacher over in Northern Kentucky, we're probably related though.

    The stories I learned though were very interesting, that my g-g grandfather died from a bee sting and his widow fled Germany when her oldest son was going to be conscripted. With six of her eight children, she fled across a river into France and made her way to Holland and sailed to the U.S. Two of her older children had already come ahead here to Cincinnati.

    Back in 2000, I decided to find out more about my dad's maternal grandmother's family because I knew my grandma had corresponded with cousins over her lifetime. Her name was Maria Darpel and she came from Germany at the age of 18 to be a nanny for a family who promised to pay for her passage back. Fortunately for my genetic make-up they reneged on that arrangement. She married first to a Werdmann who died leaving her with two children, and she remarried Henry Bens (who also had 2 or 3 children) and they subsequently had three more children, my grandma being the first of those three.

    I searched the internet for Darpels in Emsburen and came up with a webpage of someone with that name, a military chaplain nearby. I wrote to him in my "so so" German and told him who my great-grandmother and asked if he knew any Darpels in that village. It was his family, he wrote back, and said he remembered the Metz, Bens & Werdmann families well (I hadn't mentioned the last two names). My grandma's family began sending CARE packages to the family after World War II, a great help to his family since his father (my grandma's cousin) died from an illness the day the British occupied his town. In 2001, Hermann came and visited and it was jarring how much he looked like my dad and how he had mannerisms that were like my dad, even though the families had been physically separated for 120 years. He brought with him a present for my son since he arrived on my son's 13th, a cross that his brother had carved from an oak tree from his sister's farm, a farm that has been in the family since the 1600's. Whew. Some of my family have since visited over there and seen the farm and the church where our ancestors were baptized in a font given to the parish by Charlemagne. Yeah, that Charlemagne!

    On my mother's side, her maiden name is Donnellon and we have some info about those ancestors coming from County Galway. Her mother's maiden name was Kroger, her maternal grandmother was a Forbes. Between Bens (originally Benz), Kroger and Forbes, I don't have a nickle.

    Famous person side, in my wife's family, pitcher Tom Henke's dad is my mother-in-law's cousin, so he's my wife's second cousin. Both of their mothers were named Rackers and therefore, my wife and Tom Henke are also distantly related to NFL kicker Neil Rackers (I believe he's my kids' 4th cousin). We met Henke at Cinergy when he was with the Cardinals. He was trotting in from shagging balls and my wife hollered, "Hey, Tom Henke, we're related," much to the horror of my teenage daughter.

    Long winded, I know, but I love learning family history and seeing the widening circle of relatives. And that's coming from he who has 70 first cousins, without even factoring in the hundreds of other folks I'm related to more distantly.
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  10. #39
    Danger is my business! oneupper's Avatar
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    Re: Genealogy

    My Dad's great-uncle did a huge research on the family with documents and references back to the 8th century (not continuous, of course). It's pretty solid back into the 14-15th century.
    My Dad did the job of translating it all from Hungarian to English and bringing it up to date. He gave a copy to the Hungarian National Archives in Budapest. A lot of the reference material was lost in WWII.

    I'll probably be the one to put it into some electronic format or integrate it online somehow and see if some distant relatives show up.

    Has anyone used Ancestry.com or some other software for this?
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  11. #40
    First Time Caller SunDeck's Avatar
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    Re: Genealogy

    Quote Originally Posted by redsmetz View Post

    I searched the internet for Darpels in Emsburen and came up with a webpage of someone with that name, a military chaplain nearby. I wrote to him in my "so so" German and told him who my great-grandmother and asked if he knew any Darpels in that village. It was his family, he wrote back, and said he remembered the Metz, Bens & Werdmann families well (I hadn't mentioned the last two names). My grandma's family began sending CARE packages to the family after World War II, a great help to his family since his father (my grandma's cousin) died from an illness the day the British occupied his town. In 2001, Hermann came and visited and it was jarring how much he looked like my dad and how he had mannerisms that were like my dad, even though the families had been physically separated for 120 years. He brought with him a present for my son since he arrived on my son's 13th, a cross that his brother had carved from an oak tree from his sister's farm, a farm that has been in the family since the 1600's. Whew. Some of my family have since visited over there and seen the farm and the church where our ancestors were baptized in a font given to the parish by Charlemagne. Yeah, that Charlemagne!
    Part of our family is from the Ems region. I have old letters from my great-great grandmother to her family from varying times in the early to mid 20th century. One of her grand sons, my great-great uncle was a bishop and former Army chaplain (WWI) and had arranged sending shoes and clothing to them after WWII. Since they were in the British sector, he was not allowed to continue and eventually they lost contact. All we had, in terms of a location was a postcard with the village church on it.
    A few years ago, my aunt visited and found the church. She asked at the rectory about the family ("Albers") and was directed to a house down the lane. She asked the occupants about the family and then produced a picture of my great grandmother in her wedding dress and sure enough the family had the same picture! And it was the same dress my aunt had worn at her wedding.

    The other side of the family is well documented by a relative. I email with my cousins in Riemsloh occasionally- they live on the dairy farm that has been in the family since 1100. Interestingly, they seem just as interested in the family history as we are. There were three out of four men who left for the states in the 1870s (the farm passed to the eldest) and it was a complete mystery to them what had happened to them.
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  12. #41
    Redsmetz redsmetz's Avatar
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    Re: Genealogy

    Quote Originally Posted by SunDeck View Post
    Part of our family is from the Ems region. I have old letters from my great-great grandmother to her family from varying times in the early to mid 20th century. One of her grand sons, my great-great uncle was a bishop and former Army chaplain (WWI) and had arranged sending shoes and clothing to them after WWII. Since they were in the British sector, he was not allowed to continue and eventually they lost contact. All we had, in terms of a location was a postcard with the village church on it.
    A few years ago, my aunt visited and found the church. She asked at the rectory about the family ("Albers") and was directed to a house down the lane. She asked the occupants about the family and then produced a picture of my great grandmother in her wedding dress and sure enough the family had the same picture! And it was the same dress my aunt had worn at her wedding.

    The other side of the family is well documented by a relative. I email with my cousins in Riemsloh occasionally- they live on the dairy farm that has been in the family since 1100. Interestingly, they seem just as interested in the family history as we are. There were three out of four men who left for the states in the 1870s (the farm passed to the eldest) and it was a complete mystery to them what had happened to them.
    Interestingly, my wife's Rackers relatives (the one's she related to Tom Henke and, of course, Neil Rackers) are also from the Ems region.

    Some years ago, I sent a letter to every Metz in the village where my family came from (about a dozen families or so). I got back two interesting replies. One, a person kindly sent me a booklet the village put out for the villages 1100th anniversary (that's not a typo). That was very cool. Another sent a copy of a studio photograph of three young women that was marked with a studio name and then "Northside Cin, O". The women seemed to be in their early 20's and the dress was circa late 1800's. One was a dead ringer for the aunt I mentioned, but she was born in 1895, so it couldn't have been her. I made copies of the photo (Walgreens: "this is a copyrighted photo." Me: "Look at the era of clothings, I would guess the copyright has expired, since the studio has been out of business for 50 years!") and sent them to some of my former contacts. One called me from Florida and said he didn't know who the young women in the middle was, but the other two were his grandmother and her sister. I laughed and said, I didn't know who she was, but she looked just like my great aunt.
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  13. #42
    THAT'S A FACT JACK!! GAC's Avatar
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    Re: Genealogy

    My Dad's side of the Family (Clark) had a relative that for many, many years was heavily involved in researching the Clark name and genealogy. The Clark family reunion has been held annually in Gallipolis, Ohio since the early 20s, and while he was alive he'd attend and give an annual report/update. All that data was made into book form about 30 years ago, and he gave copies to all the family members. I had one, but lost it in my house fire a few years ago, but my Mom and brothers have theres still. I need to borrow it and get a copy made.

    It's an interesting read. The name "Clark" has been traced back to the Middle Ages, primarily Ireland and Scotland, and was derived from "clerk, cleric", meaning "one who can read and write". At that time, the primary members of the literate class were the clergy, and the man who kept the books was the clark. According to the genealogy in the book, my ancestry was traced back to Argyllshire, Scotland in which the occupation of one of my ancestors was "the clerk of Argyllshire". It later was anglicized into Clarke, and somewhere along the line, after my ancestors came to America in the latter part of the 1600s/early 1700s the "e" was dropped.

    There's a cemetery outside of Gallipolis that has many of my ancestors buried there, and use to be called the Clark Family Cemetery. About 15 years ago, after attending the reunion, we all went there and I made video footage, along with commentary, on many of the grave sites. One of my "direct" ancestors, who is buried there, is Thomas Clark ....

    Lieutenant Thomas Clark Sr was born in Montgomery County (later Giles County), Virginia, August 10, 1759. He died on 9 March 1831 at the age of 71 in Walnut Twp, Gallia County, Ohio. He was buried in Clark Cemetary on Bostick Farm, Sandfork, Gallia County, Oh. Revolutionary War Soldier and early settler of Gallia County Ohio. In December 1776, he enlisted as Ensign in the 13th Light Infantry of the Continental Army under Captain Silas Zane. In April 1777, at the age of seventeen, he was promoted to the rank of First Lieutenant. He was stationed at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, during the severe and historic winter of 1777-78. While at this post, he received a monthly pay of $27. He retired from the servince in September of 1778. He was small in stature, had red hair and a ruddy complexion. In 1787 he married Jemima Scutt and fathered six children (Thomas Clark Jr served in the War of 1812). He came to Gallia County in 1808 and was one of the earliest settlers in what was to become Walnut Township. He cleared some land on Sand Fork Creek, built a log cabin, and began to farm. Walnut Township was organized on April 13, 1819. At the first election held on Sand Fork Creek, Thomas Clark was elected one of the first Justices of the Peace. He died March 8, 1831, and was burried in the Clark Cemetery on his farm.

    George Rogers Clark, and his brother William (of Lewis and Clark), the sons of John and Ann Rogers Clark, are also within that "family tree". I've always been told growing up they were distant cousins. I need to do more research on this I guess.
    Last edited by GAC; 02-06-2011 at 06:20 AM.
    "panic" only comes from having real expectations

  14. #43
    Hey Cubs Fans RFS62's Avatar
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    Re: Genealogy

    Quote Originally Posted by GAC View Post
    It's an interesting read. The name "Clark" has been traced back to the Middle Ages, primarily Ireland and Scotland, and was derived from "clerk, cleric", meaning "one who can read and write".

    Allow me to be of some assistance.

    You left out a key part of that derivation. I believe it means "one who can read and write, and write, and write, and write, and write......"

    That is all. Carry on.

    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover."
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  15. #44
    Potential Lunch Winner Dom Heffner's Avatar
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    Re: Genealogy

    The new documentary on Pete Rose, "The Hit King" was directed by my cousin, Terry Lukemire. We also went to high school together.

    A side note: Terry also directed a documentary on the Naked Cowboy, who is my mother's first cousin's son. So i guess I am a first cousin twice removed...

    Weird to have one relative do a movie on another, but I do not believe they are related to each other.

    I think I have mentioned before that I am also cousins with Bob Wiesenhahn, the UC Bearcat/McNick High School basketball star.
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  16. #45
    Danger is my business! oneupper's Avatar
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    Re: Genealogy

    Quote Originally Posted by Dom Heffner View Post
    T
    A side note: Terry also directed a documentary on the Naked Cowboy, who is my mother's first cousin's son. So i guess I am a first cousin twice removed...

    .
    Dom, you would guess wrong. I didn't know this until my kids told me, but here is how the cousin thing works:

    The First/Second, etc. issue hinges on who your common ascendant is. If it's your Grandmother, you are first cousins. If it's your great-grandmother, you are second cousins (and so on).

    The "degree" of removal is a generational thing. Your mother and her cousin are part of the same generation. Hence, no removal. You, on the other hand are once removed (below) from your mother's cousin and therefore once removed.

    The Naked cowboy and you belong to the same generation, and share a great-grand parent. You are therefore second cousins, (no removal).

    Second cousins sounds a lot cooler than first cousins twice removed.
    Last edited by oneupper; 02-06-2011 at 10:45 AM.
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