Turn Off Ads?
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 30

Thread: Cincinnati: America's Best Ice Cream

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    All around
    Posts
    7,576

    Cincinnati: America's Best Ice Cream

    America's Best Ice Cream

    Cool off with these sensational scoops

    By Jennifer MurphyPhoto Courtesy of Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory

    Whether you’re craving a scoop of burnt-caramel ice cream from Cincinnati-based Graeter’s, a go-to favorite of celebrities like Oprah Winfrey and Sarah Jessica Parker, or devouring a scoop of Southern black-bottom pie ice cream at Toscanini’s in Cambridge, Mass., nothing screams summer more than the sweet, decadent taste of ice cream.


    Legends abound when it comes to this favorite dessert’s origins. Some historians credit the Chinese for creating the first ice creams circa 3000 B.C.; Marco Polo, they say, then brought the recipe back to Europe. Long before the onslaught of commercial manufacturers, ice cream was a luxury item made in small batches by a labor-intensive process. The dessert was fashionable among the royal courts of Europe and once served by Presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson.


    Today, a growing number of makers have returned to producing ice cream the old-fashioned way: by hand and using fresh, local ingredients. “People are moving away from the ‘bigger is better’ approach and enjoying more respectful quantities of premium brands, rather than jumbo scoops,” says pastry chef David Lebovitz, who trained at the world-renowned Chez Panisse in Berkeley and authored "The Perfect Scoop," touted as the ultimate guide to ice cream. Lebovitz says he’s seen “an explosion of handcrafted ice cream and gelato places opening up that use fresh, pure ingredients.”


    With its temperate climate and abundance of farm-fresh dairy and produce, it’s no wonder California has the market cornered on some of the best ice creams in the country. Bi-Rite in San Francisco serves small-batch ice creams in flavors like salted caramel and honey lavender, with honey that comes from hives less than a mile away from the store. Cones are made with organic ingredients and seasonal desserts like the springtime sundae, made with crčme fraiche ice cream, strawberries and sugar cookies, are impossible to resist.


    In Santa Barbara, Calif., family-run McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams uses fresh cream from local dairies. “Our family has been making and selling our super premium ice creams — 17 percent milkfat, 15 percent air content, all-natural — for 60 years here in Santa Barbara,” says Jimmy Young, McConnell’s president. Cocoas come from Guittard Chocolate Company in San Francisco, sugar from Hawaii, pure vanillas from Paso Robles. Several of McConnell’s flavors, including Brazilian coffee, pumpkin, macadamia nut and vanilla bean, among others, are available by the pint, so you can devour your favorite flavor at home.


    Indeed, homes are where most ice creams in America are being consumed. Marti Pupillo, assistant director of communications with the International Dairy Foods Association, says that “more than 90 percent of American households buy ice cream,” and “manufacturers closely monitor and react to changes in consumer preferences.”


    “Consumer interest in health and wellness is driving many of the ice cream innovations you see on the market today,” notes Pupillo. “Companies now offer a variety of products that fall into the ‘better for you’ category. Low-fat, reduced-fat and no-fat ice creams continue to grow in popularity, especially with the introduction of new ‘churned’ formulations that taste like traditional ice cream but have less fat and fewer calories.”


    Calories aside, when it comes to creating an unforgettable ice cream, the quality of ingredients is what matters most, according to Lebovitz. “It’s one of the few things where the less you add, the better. I mean, in the old days, the best ice cream was heavy cream, peaches and sugar all churned up by hand. Purity is another thing. An intense, bittersweet chocolate or unctuous butter pecan ice cream is wonderful and doesn’t need much embellishment.”


    For purity, nobody does it better than organic ice cream entrepreneur Sue Sebion, who runs Sibby’s Organic Zone Ice Cream Parlor in Viroqua, Wis. Made on her family’s homestead farm with organic milk from local sources, it’s not hard to see why Sibby’s has become synonymous with good, old-fashioned wholesomeness. This is ice cream at its best: pure, simple and made with love.


    Graeter’s, another Midwest treasure, has been churning out the sweet stuff since 1870. The company uses a labor-intensive process that involves making the ice cream just two gallons at a time in a chilled, spinning French pot. Liquid chocolate is then poured in to create mammoth chocolate chips, one of Graeter’s trademarks. Flavors like tangerine cream and strawberry chip are available seasonally, with traditional ice creams such as butter pecan and mint chocolate chip served year-round.


    In addition to the resurgence of handmade ice creams, many gelato parlors have cropped up across the country, prompting many consumers to wonder what the difference is between the two desserts. Pâtisserie chef Rachel Khoo, who trained at Le Cordon Bleu, says “the difference lies in the percentage of fats and the production process.” Like ice cream, gelato is made with milk and sugar, but has less air than ice cream, making the flavor more intense. Gelato is also made with whole, non-homogenized cow’s milk rather than milk solids, and therefore contains less butterfat than traditional American ice creams. Because the milk is not homogenized, gelato melts faster than ice cream. “In a nutshell, gelato is a more flavorsome, less caloric and slightly more sophisticated version of ice cream,” Khoo says.


    On the East Coast, it’s easy to stroll past Ciao Bella, the tiny gelato store in New York City’s fashionable Nolita neighborhood—but the line of patrons devouring scoops on the sidewalk should tip you off. With flavors like key lime to graham cracker swirl, there’s no better way to cool down on a hot summer afternoon in the city. Ciao Bella’s gelatos have become so popular they are now distributed by the pint to specialty food stores throughout the country. Although a trip directly to the source is always worthwhile.

  2. Turn Off Ads?
  3. #2
    Senor Votto Degenerate39's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    7,915

    Re: Cincinnati: America's Best Ice Cream

    America's Best Chili too if it's not it should be. Can't go wrong with Cincinnati Chili.
    Most Vottomatic Player

  4. #3
    We Need Our Myths reds1869's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Overlooking GABP
    Posts
    4,466

    Re: Cincinnati: America's Best Ice Cream

    Cincinnati is one of the great food cities in America. Very few places can match the breadth and depth of truly local food in this town. I've lived in a lot of cities and been to many, many more, and can say that nowhere has a food culture as unique as The Queen City. Even when I'm only gone for a week I get homesick for the food--and I'm not a native son, either.

  5. #4
    Member klw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    6,308

    Re: Cincinnati: America's Best Ice Cream

    No mention of Thomas Sweet means no credibility for this article for me.

  6. #5
    Member OnBaseMachine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    34,844

    Re: Cincinnati: America's Best Ice Cream

    Quote Originally Posted by Herd Fan View Post
    Cincinnati is one of the great food cities in America. Very few places can match the breadth and depth of truly local food in this town. I've lived in a lot of cities and been to many, many more, and can say that nowhere has a food culture as unique as The Queen City. Even when I'm only gone for a week I get homesick for the food--and I'm not a native son, either.
    I agree. I love going to Cincy not just for the Reds but for the great food. The cheese coneys, LaRosa'a pizza and calzones, UDF ice cream (I've never tried Graeter's, Montgomery Inn ribs, White Castle. I love it all. I'll be in Cincy in August for a three game series against the Astros and I'm looking forward to some good eating.
    I miss Adam Dunn.

  7. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    All around
    Posts
    7,576

    Re: Cincinnati: America's Best Ice Cream

    The only time I ever made it to Cincy, I went to "ChiliFest".

  8. #7
    Member improbus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    2,082

    Re: Cincinnati: America's Best Ice Cream

    I miss LaRosa's and Goetta more than anything else. Graeters is good, but I'm more of a local soft serve kind of guy.
    Variatio delectat - Cicero

  9. #8
    Be the ball Roy Tucker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Mason, OH
    Posts
    12,123

    Re: Cincinnati: America's Best Ice Cream

    Cincinnati doesn't have chili, it has Cincinnati chili.

    I love my coneys and 3-ways, but Cincinnati chili is a odd little branch off the main chili tree that is unique to this area. A variation on a theme.

    When I talk about good chili, I don't mention what we have around here. Cincinnati chili is good on things like spaghetti or little hot dogs, but I can't imagine having a bowl of it.

    Pay attention to the open sky

  10. #9
    breath westofyou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    42,654

    Re: Cincinnati: America's Best Ice Cream

    I go to San Francisco for the food, I go to Cincinnati to visit friends and family.

    Hearing Cincinnati mentioned as a great food city is funny (to me)... especially when franchised food is part of the equation.

  11. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    All around
    Posts
    7,576

    Re: Cincinnati: America's Best Ice Cream

    Quote Originally Posted by westofyou View Post
    I go to San Francisco for the food, I go to Cincinnati to visit friends and family.

    Hearing Cincinnati mentioned as a great food city is funny (to me)... especially when franchised food is part of the equation.

    My favorite Ribs are in South Bay.

  12. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    8,840

    Re: Cincinnati: America's Best Ice Cream

    Penn Station is a sometimes overlooked Cincinnati original too. I'm a big fan. UDF is overshadowed by Graeter's sometimes as well. The malts are very underappreciated.

    Also OBM, White Castle is actually a Columbus original, but it's still Ohio all the same.

    Cincinnati is a GREAT food city. There are so many great options.

  13. #12
    Member improbus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    2,082

    Re: Cincinnati: America's Best Ice Cream

    I'm more of a Putz's guy...
    Variatio delectat - Cicero

  14. #13
    Pre-tty, pre-tty good!! MWM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    12,324

    Re: Cincinnati: America's Best Ice Cream

    Quote Originally Posted by westofyou View Post
    I go to San Francisco for the food, I go to Cincinnati to visit friends and family.

    Hearing Cincinnati mentioned as a great food city is funny (to me)... especially when franchised food is part of the equation.
    Not really. I've heard people from all over say the same thing about Cincinnati. For a city the size of Cincy, it has a lot of really good restaurants and some interesting and unique food options. It's one of the things the city if known for.
    Grape works as a soda. Sort of as a gum. I wonder why it doesn't work as a pie. Grape pie? There's no grape pie. - Larry David

  15. #14
    The Lineups stink. KronoRed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    West N. Carolina
    Posts
    55,652

    Re: Cincinnati: America's Best Ice Cream

    Quote Originally Posted by improbus View Post
    I'm more of a Putz's guy...
    Agreed, Graeter's tastes like generic bryers.
    Go Gators!

  16. #15
    We Need Our Myths reds1869's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Overlooking GABP
    Posts
    4,466

    Re: Cincinnati: America's Best Ice Cream

    Quote Originally Posted by MWM View Post
    Not really. I've heard people from all over say the same thing about Cincinnati. For a city the size of Cincy, it has a lot of really good restaurants and some interesting and unique food options. It's one of the things the city if known for.
    Absolutely. I've never understood people that put down Cincinnati and totally ignore its reputation within the culinary world (hint: its a good one, even following the closure of a certain 5 star institution). The quality and variety of food for a city this size is staggering. Though I have to agree with San Fran's food greatness; many of the best meals I've ever had were in the Bay Area.


Turn Off Ads?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Board Moderators may, at their discretion and judgment, delete and/or edit any messages that violate any of the following guidelines: 1. Explicit references to alleged illegal or unlawful acts. 2. Graphic sexual descriptions. 3. Racial or ethnic slurs. 4. Use of edgy language (including masked profanity). 5. Direct personal attacks, flames, fights, trolling, baiting, name-calling, general nuisance, excessive player criticism or anything along those lines. 6. Posting spam. 7. Each person may have only one user account. It is fine to be critical here - that's what this board is for. But let's not beat a subject or a player to death, please.

Thank you, and most importantly, enjoy yourselves!


RedsZone.com is a privately owned website and is not affiliated with the Cincinnati Reds or Major League Baseball


Contact us: Boss | GIK | BCubb2003 | dabvu2498 | Gallen5862 | LexRedsFan | Plus Plus | RedlegJake | redsfan1995 | The Operator | Tommyjohn25