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Thread: 2009 MLB draft

  1. #16
    Member 11larkin11's Avatar
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    Re: 2009 MLB draft

    I hope this doesn't turn into another Crow thread, but I still wouldn't be upset if we picked him up. I want Gibson as my number one, who i think will be there, though.
    Domo Arigato, Here Comes Joey Votto

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  3. #17
    Posting in Dynarama M2's Avatar
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    Re: 2009 MLB draft

    If a few pitchers and prep players have big years, Dustin Ackley might slip a bit.
    Baseball isn't a magic trick ... it doesn't get spoiled if you figure out how it works. - gonelong

    I'm witchcrafting everybody.

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    Re: 2009 MLB draft

    Quote Originally Posted by M2 View Post
    If a few pitchers and prep players have big years, Dustin Ackley might slip a bit.
    If he shows he can play defense in center field then I'd have major interest. I don't like him as much at first base.
    I miss Adam Dunn.

  5. #19
    BobC, get a legit F.O.! Mario-Rijo's Avatar
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    Re: 2009 MLB draft

    Quote Originally Posted by OnBaseMachine View Post
    If he shows he can play defense in center field then I'd have major interest. I don't like him as much at first base.
    I agree a hitting machine in CF sign me up.
    "You can't let praise or criticism get to you. It's a weakness to get caught up in either one."

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  6. #20
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    Re: 2009 MLB draft

    Quote Originally Posted by M2 View Post
    If a few pitchers and prep players have big years, Dustin Ackley might slip a bit.
    If Ackley doesn't show some power he might slip a bit....

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    Re: 2009 MLB draft

    Top 5 High Schoolers via Saber Scouting http://www.saberscouting.com/2008/07/16/hshot30top5/

    Tyler Matzek LHP
    Matzek was relatively little known entering showcase season, but has been at every major event and has been the biggest riser, as most of our top 10-15 were known elite players before their showcase performances.

    Baseball America’s Dave Perkin compared Matzek to the Royals sandwich pick (36th overall) in the recent 2008 draft, Mike Montgomery, and Perkin is certainly onto something there, with a lot of similarities between these two projectable, three-pitch, southern California lefties. That being said, Matzek is this high on the list (and at the top of some insider’s lists) because he has a notch better stuff, with three pitches that project for above-average, without lacking command or projectability.

    Matzek works at 89-92, touching 94 with a heavy fastball and mixing in a knockout mid-70s curveball. His curveball is a two-plane bender that is regularly above-average now with a chance to be a plus pitch. He also mixes in solid slider and shows feel for a changeup that flashes above-average.

    He’s projectable and athletic with a clean arm and simple delivery, throwing from a classic high 3/4 arm angle. That allows Matzek to work both sides of the plate effectively, pounding the zone with advanced feel. He’s got four pitches and command that project for average or better; there’s just a lot to like. One insider said Matzek reminded him of another lefty: the 4th overall pick of the 2008 draft, former U. San Diego hurler and Orioles draftee, Brian Matusz.

    One scout that saw Matzek at the Perfect Game National showcase in Minneapolis said, “if his breaking ball develops like you hope, he could be Clayton Kershaw.” That might sound a bit optimistic, and that I’m using too many comparisons, but considering how under-the-radar Kershaw was entering his senior year, it doesn’t seem so far-fetched

    Austin Maddox C
    I’ve talked about Maddox a few times on the site, both in the 2009 draft preview on the podcast (near the end) and in a review of the Sarasota Classic. I’ve been able to see Maddox a handful of times during his junior season, including seeing his team win the state championship in Sarasota, and he brings his full toolbox to the yard every time out. I also have some video I’ll post soon.

    Maddox’s stance (check the above picture for an idea) and swing are reminiscent of Mark McGwire due to his powerful, leveraged, yet compact right-handed stroke with serious bat speed. Maddox just squares balls up, hitting over .500 this year against top competition, and has flashed his plus-plus raw power in every game I’ve seen him play. The scouting community, who largely ignore juniors during the regular season, saw this power when Maddox hit multiple homers over 400 feet with wood bats in recent national showcases.

    That being said, Maddox is the top position player on this list because of his defensive tools. He consistently uses his plus-plus howitzer to register pop times under 1.85 and has been under 1.80, while hitting 95 on the mound. He also has what I, and a few scouts I’ve talked to, feel is already big league average receiving and blocking skills. Maddox is also a hard worker that gets high marks for his makeup; he’s committed to Florida.

    The only real question with Maddox is if his already extra-large frame will be able to stay agile enough to remain behind the plate. Some may knock his team’s schedule, as they are in the smallest classification (1A) in the state and play some cream puff teams, but intentionally schedule almost every other game against top competition, and Maddox is a showcase veteran that can hit with wood. A scout familiar with Maddox sums it up: “We have him as a top follow and I see a Mike Piazza package, except with a cannon behind the plate.”

    Matt Purke
    As you might expect from a top player on this list, Purke has all the classic things you look for in a pitching prospect. He’s the next in a seemingly never-ending line of physical, aggressive power arms from the Lonestar State, hitting 94 in a recent showcase.

    Working with a clean arm and near effortless delivery from a 3/4 arm angle, Purke pounds the zone with three solid pitches, good command, and an aggressive approach. He owns a present solid-average fastball that sits at 90-92 with some late life, but has hit 94 and projects to add a few ticks as his slim frame bulks up. Purke throws a two-plane slider with good tilt and late bite to gets funny swings from high school hitters now, and projects as an out-pitch. He also mixes in a solid changeup, though only sparingly as he relies heavily on his fastball/slider combination.

    As for the downside, like many young power pitchers, he can lose his mechanics at times, and like many frequent showcase attendees, his velocity, breaking ball, and feel can vary from appearance to appearancde due to fatigue; but that’s about all.

    Those aren’t huge concerns, and clearly doesn’t effect scouts perception of him: “He’s a projectable, velocity left-hander with a hard slider and just blows hitters away at these showcases. I’m a big fan.”

    It’s easy to slap a Scott Kazmir comparison on him, given the similarities (skinny Texas prep lefty with a power fastball-slider combo), but Kazmir was a dominating showcase legend that Purke hasn’t yet proven to be, though he has shown flashes and is the class of this year’s pitching crop along with Matzek.

    Donavan Tate CF
    If you’re reading about the draft this early, you like tools, and if you want a suggestion for a new James Bond villain, let me suggest Donavan Tate as Tools Galore. He compares favorably to the 14th overall pick in the 2008 draft, the Twins’ Aaron Hicks, as a centerfielder, both for his pros and cons.

    Tate is the son of former NFL running back Lars Tate and is a top football recruit, with Rivals.com ranking him as the 86th best recruit in the nation. To get an idea of his athleticism, Rivals lists Tate as an “athlete” for football purposes (no set projected college position, generally the most athletic guys on the field) and among the “athletes,” (again, the most athletic football players in the country), Tate was named the most athletic.

    Tate uses his plus-plus arm (hit 95 from the outfield—that’s with no mound involved) and true 80 speed (6.3 to 6.4 in the 60-yard) to quarterback his high school team, and uses his 6′3, 200 frame to deliver big hits as a safety. Michigan and Georgia want him as a QB, while USC and Florida like him as a safety. So, he’s got a little bit of talent.

    As far as baseball-specific skills, his speed and arm obviously play in center where he’s a developing defender that should be plus or more as a center fielder in time. Tate shows plus raw power and squares pitches up consistently when he makes contact.

    The problem, as with the aforementioned Hicks, is if he will make enough contact, as Tate has rough plate discipline. In showcases, Tate produces, but not without some cause for concern. To put some numbers behind this general scouting consensus, BA’s Matt Blood reports that Tate slugged two HRs, a triple, and two doubles in 19 at-bats at the Tournament of Stars, but struck out six times with only one walk. Blood adds that one day, Tate made contact on seven of ten swings, while the next day he whiffed on six of seven swings.

    That performance makes for an impressive line of .316/.350/.842, considering Tate is a high school junior using wood bats against top pitching; but almost any toolshed first-round bust has put up that kind of performance, so what did we really learn? Tate’s hitability will be a situation to monitor throughout the spring, but it will be something you can only learn about after talking to multiple scouts or after multiple viewings, and even then it will likely be heavily debated within each organization. Let the debate begin.


    Jacob Turner RHP
    Turner has been on the radar screen for some time as a top arm for the 2009 draft, as a proven showcase veteran, and he did nothing to change that standing in the recent national showcases.

    Owner of a prototypical power right-hander’s frame, Turner attacks hitters with three solid pitches, including a 90-94 mph fastball with solid sink. Turner’s velocity comes from a high 3/4 arm angle, and sneaks up on hitters due to a compact delivery and easy arm action.

    Turner follows his above-average fastball with an above-average overhand curveball that can get slurvy with two-plane break. He also mixes in a solid changeup that shows some potential along with an aggressive approach to pitching, and solid command, made possible by Turner’s easy delivery.

    There are a fair amount of scouts on the Jacob Turner bandwagon, as his lower-risk profile and outstanding showcase performances have some putting him ahead of Purke and even Matzek.

    There’s also definite symmetry between Turner and the 2008 draft’s top Missouri prep arm, Tim Melville. Both are big-framed right-handers with three quality pitches, good feel, and a chance to be above-average to plus across the board. Melville is a little more projectable and athletic, but they have similar stuff, command, and lengthy showcase track records

  8. #22
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    Re: 2009 MLB draft

    High School Prospects 6-30 +2:
    http://www.saberscouting.com/2009draftindex/

    6. Max Stassi, C
    School & Hometown: Yuba City HS; Yuba City, CA
    Specs: 5′10, 190, Bats R, Throws R
    Skinny: A polished, all-around backstop that lacks the frame and power scouts look for behind the plate, but shows solid gap pop, an above-average bat, and is an above-average defender with a plus arm. Stassi has really raised his profile on the showcase circuit into a legitimate top 2 rounder. UCLA commit.


    7. Mychal Givens, RHP/SS
    School & Hometown: Plant HS; Tampa, FL
    Specs: 6′1, 190, Bats R, Throws R
    Scouting Report: You can take a look at some video I took of Givens, what I thought of him from my first two looks, and my full thoughts from the initial Hot 30 rankings. Givens is an athletic and heady leader, a very good defender, and has a solid stroke with a little pop. I didn’t see enough size/projection (looks in person like 5′10, 175), power, or consistent hitability to project him as a first round pick, but realized that his track record, makeup, and performance give him upward mobility on draft boards. At the PG National showcase, he was up to 94 while flashing an above-average slider and changeup from a low 3/4 arm angle; similar to what I saw, but showing improvement across the board. As it stands now, there’s a slight lean from the people I’ve talked to for Givens to stay on the mound, but his progess on the mound and at the plate should be an interesting draft storyline to monitor.

    8. Luke Bailey, C
    School & Hometown: Troup HS; LaGrange, GA
    Specs: 6′0, 195, Bats R, Throws R
    Skinny: Yet another big-time prep catcher has huge raw power, solid receiving skills, and an above-average arm. Bailey is ranked lower than Maddox and Stassi because doesn’t have the same kind of hitability, but he’s in the discussion as the best in a very deep crop of catchers.

    9. Zach Wheeler, RHP
    School & Hometown: East Paulding HS; Dallas, GA
    Specs: 6′4, 180, Bats S, Throws R
    Skinny: Pitched at 90-93 at the PG National Showcase and showed good command of three pitches. As the height/weight suggests, Wheeler has a good amount of projection left, and with good stuff, good command, and an easy motion, he has all the makings of a top prospect.

    10. LeVon Washington, CF/2B
    School & Hometown: Buchholz HS; Gainesville, FL
    Specs: 5′10, 170, Bats L, Throws R
    Skinny: Washington put up a 6.21 60-yard in front of hundreds of top-level eyeballs at the PG National Showcase and I pause to call his speed 80 because he’s a full grade or two off the scale. Split the difference and call it 85 speed. He’s polished on the basepaths but a little raw in the field and at the plate with solid pop, but Washington’s wheels cover a multitude of sins, both on offense and defense. He plays shortstop for his high school team and has an above-average arm, but he’s normally a centerfielder at showcases and has tried his hand at second base as well, which elicits obvious Luis Castillo comparisons. Check out a recent BA profile for more about Washington. Florida commit.

    11. Chad Thompson, RHP
    School & Hometown: El Toro HS; Trabuco Canyon, CA
    Specs: 6′8, 215, Bats R, Throws R
    Skinny: The position and height tells most of the story here, as Thompson is a towering right-hander with good downward plane that has hit 94. He’s still raw, but has a clean arm and smooth delivery; if he can clean up the secondary pitches and command, he should shoot up draft boards.

    12. Chris Jenkins, RHP
    School & Hometown: Westfield HS; Westfield, NJ
    Specs: 6′7, 225, Bats R, Throws R
    Skinny: Our next towering right-hander hails from New Jersey and has showed some dirty stuff at times. He obviously has the body and downward plane scouts are looking for and was up to 97 last spring and has topped out at 94 on the showcase circuit. He shows a hard slider that could be an out-pitch and has a clean arm, but his stuff varies from appearance to appearance and one insider said that he’s the, “worst athlete I’ve ever seen.” That being said, bigger guys take longer to come around and Jenkins could really take a step forward in the spring.

    13. Bobby Borchering, 3B
    School & Hometown: Bishop Verot HS; Alva, FL
    Specs: 6′4, 190, Bats B, Throws R
    Skinny: Borchering has also been covered on SaberScouting in the past and has an intriguing set of tools and projection. He currently plays third base and has an above-average arm, but Borchering’s frame has a lot of projection left and that may ultimately force a move to first base as he fills out. He profiles well there, as he’s got a smooth swing from both sides with advanced hitability from both sides, plus power that already shows up in games, a showcase track record, and solid athleticism. Florida commit.

    14. Jonathan Singleton, 1B
    School & Hometown: Millikan HS; Long Beach, CA
    Specs: 6′2, 220, Bats L, Throws L
    Skinny: Singleton is a big, left-handed, power-hitting first baseman that put on a show at the PG National Showcase HR Derby, winning he contest while hitting a number of balls in the upper deck at the MetroDome. Singleton has also shown some solid hitability and athleticism, but make no mistake; his lefty power is his calling card and his meal ticket.

    15. David Nick, SS
    School & Hometown: Cypress HS; Cypress, CA
    Specs: 6′2, 175, Bats R, Throws R
    Skinny: Nick isn’t a toolbox like many highly-regarded prep shortstops, he’s more of a solid all-around player with polish, but he’s got some upside too. From a projectable 6′2 frame, Nick shows a very good bat with gap power and high-level defense. Scouts love his makeup, all-out style, and how the game comes easily to him. UCLA commit.

    16. Jacob Morris, CF
    School & Hometown: Coppell HS; Coppell, TX
    Specs: 6′3, 195, Bats B, Throws R
    Skinny: Morris is a tooled-up switch-hitter ones scout called an, “antelope,” that can play anywhere on the field, but that has kept him from finding a defensive home. He has the potential to be ranked higher come next June if he can show a better approach, as he struggled to make contact, particularly from the left side, on the showcase circuit. It appears his plus tools will play the best, and quickest, in center field, as a sort of poor man’s Donavan Tate.

    17. Andrew Susac, C
    School & Hometown: Jesuit HS; Roseville, CA
    Specs: 6′1, 190, Bats R, Throws R
    Skinny: Susac heads up the second tier of what is shaping up to be an outstanding prep catching class. He has shown an above-average arm and at least average defense along with above-average raw power, a package that many piqued the interest of many scouts. Susac also shows an ability to hit with wood against elite pitching, but his bat lacks polish and he lacks the big-time tools of the backstops ahead of him. He projects as a top three rounds prospect. Oregon State commit.

    18. Scooter Gennett, SS/RHP
    School & Hometown: Sarasota HS; Sarasota, FL
    Specs: 5′10, 170, Bats L, Throws R
    Skinny: Gennett is the heir apparent to Casey Kelly’s spot as starting shortstop and ace for the powerhouse Sarasota Sailors. Gennett has three pitches he can throw for strikes including a low 90’s fastball but has a future as a hitter in the middle of the diamond. It’s not clear yet if he’s a long-term shortstop, second base, or center fielder, but his tools will play almost anywhere. Scooter (his given name is Ryan) swings a mean left-handed bat with surprising pull power for his size and a solid approach. He has good makeup and all-around baseball instincts with quick feet and an above-average arm. Florida State commit.

    19. Jacob Marisnick, CF
    School & Hometown: Riverside Poly HS; Riverside, CA
    Specs: 6′4, 200, Bats R, Throws R
    Skinny: Marisnick is a big athlete from southern California with some serious tools that is still rough around the edges. He has above-average speed in a 6′4, 200 pound frame that can play in center field for now with an above-average arm. His bat from the right side impresses at times and his power approach is projectable as an above-average big league regular and first round pick if his hitability and pitch selection can progress. Scouts dream on his projectable, near ideal frame and also on his flashes of big power and hitability in BP sessions.

    20. Keyvius Sampson, RHP
    School & Hometown: Forest HS; Ocala, FL
    Specs: 6′1, 180, Bats R, Throws R
    Skinny: Sampson was being touted as an athletic center field prospect during his junior season, but now is being considered primarily as a polished right-hander. Sampson carries himself like a pro and commands his 90-92 mph fastball to both sides of the plate. He also has a particularly smooth delivery with easy velocity and plus athleticism. Sampson’s secondary stuff and size come up a little short and that limits his upside, but he’s got just about everything else going for him.

    21. Matthew Moynihan, CF
    School & Hometown: Cathedral Catholic HS; San Diego, CA
    Specs: 6′2, 205, Bats L, Throws, R
    Skinny: Moynihan frequently gets comparisons to fellow SoCal toolsy outfielder Jacob Marisnick for their centerfield tools and wide skillset. Moynihan is a plus runner and above-average defender in center with an average arm. He also swings a solid, consistent bat from the left side and his strong, 6′2, 205 pound frame figures to show more game power in time.

    22. Brooks Pounders, 1B/RHP
    School & Hometown: Temecula Valley HS; Temecula, CA
    Specs: 6′5, 220, Bats R, Throws R
    Skinny: Pounders is a well-known two-way prospect with pro potential as both a hitter and pitcher. On the mound, he’s been working from 88-92 with an above-average slider and curve. As a hitter, he has dropped some serious bombs on the showcase circuit in the past few months. While he’s athletic for his size, Pounders’ body is a little soft, he lacks some feel on the mound, and can get pull-happy at the plate. Scouts tend to prefer his power bat over his solid stuff on the mound. Southern Cal commit.

    23. Daniel Tuttle, RHP
    School & Hometown: Randleman HS; Randleman, NC
    Specs: 6′2, 185, Bats R, Throws R
    Skinny: Tuttle is another solid right-handed pitching prospect that has impressed scouts during showcase season. He works at 90-92 and has been up to 93 with a clean arm and solid command. Tuttle also uses a quality curveball but has a head tilt that is unconventional and worries some, despite solid mechanics otherwise. Tuttle also has limited height and bulk, but does have projection remaining.

    24. Beau Wright, LHP
    School & Hometown: Los Alamitos HS; Los Alamitos, CA
    Specs: 6′2, 205, Bats L, Throws L
    Skinny: Wright is a solid left-hander from southern California that has been blowing away high school hitters at recent showcases with solid stuff and advanced command. Wright works at 89-92 mph with a big-breaking curveball and good feel for his craft. At this level, he doesn’t need much more than that, but he’ll need to continue to make progress to find his way into the top two rounds come June.

    25. Mike Zunino, C
    School & Hometown: Mariner HS; Cape Coral, FL
    Specs: 6′2, 185, Bats R, Throws R
    Skinny: Zunino has been known for some time as a top catching prospect for his advanced catch-and-throw skills and instincts along with his bloodlines: his father is an southern Florida area scout. Many still question Zunino’s long-term hitability, but everyone likes his makeup, showcase track record, professional frame, solid pop, and above-average defensive tools. Florida commit.

    26. Matt Davidson, 3B
    School & Hometown: Yucaipa HS, Yucaipa, CA
    Specs: 6′3, 210, Bats R, Throws R
    Skinny: Davidson is a southern California power/power prospect with 90+ mph velocity on the mound and thump in his bat at a corner position. He has a sturdy, solid frame that creates big power but will limit him to a corner position, possibly catcher. Davidson is a better prospect as a high-ceiling power bat, despite some questions about his general athleticism and present ability to make contact against top competition. Southern Cal commit.

    27. Madison Younginer, RHP
    School & Hometown: Mauldin HS; Simpsonville, SC
    Specs: 6′3, 190, Bats R, Throws R
    Skinny: Younginer is a very projectable right-handed power arm. He’s been working at 91-94, with a hammer curve at 75-78, both above-average offerings when he commands them. That’s the problem, though: Younginer has some trouble harnessing his stuff. His pure stuff, relatively calm mechanics, clean arm action, and projectable frame all bode well for his future.

    28. Matt Hobgood, RHP
    School & Hometown: Norco HS; Norco, CA
    Specs: 6′4, 245, Bats R, Throws R
    Skinny: Hobgood caught scouts’ attention at recent showcases in similar fashion to Younginer: with big stuff and a lack of contol. Hobgood has worked from 91-95, depending on whether he’s working with a power sinker or trying to top out a four-seamer for the radar guns. With either approach, he hasn’t been hitting spots too often and had trouble locating his offspeed pitches. There’s a lack of feel, some effort in the delivery, and some softness in his body, but the pure power stuff and workhorse frame are there.

    29. Chad Kettler, 2B/3B
    School & Hometown: Coppell HS; Coppell, TX
    Specs: 6′1, 190, Bats B, Throws R
    Skinny: Kettler is a versatile infielder with an impressive switch-hitting stroke. He plays shortstop currently, but won’t stick there long-term due to below-average speed. Second base is the best profile as he has solid defensive actions and plenty of arm for any position. Kettler’s meal ticket is his hitting ability from both sides, and while he has some pop, his frame limits more than average power. There may be some questions about Kettler’s ultimate position, but he’s on the list because he can hit, he can play the infield, and he’s an instinctual baseball rat.

    30. Deven Marrero, SS
    School & Hometown: American Heritage HS; Davie, FL
    Specs: 6′0, 160, Bats R, Throws R
    Skinny: Marrero is the younger brother of Nationals top prospect and former 1st rounder Chris Marrero. He also plays for 2008 High School National Champions American Heritage High. With that kind of pedigree and background, along with a gamer style and solid makeup, you can see what there is to like about Marrero. That being said, he lacks bulk and doesn’t have a standout bat, along with no more than average speed. He looks to most scouts right now like a good college player with rock solid intangibles. That type of player’s draft fortunes depends on his bonus demands, but he looks a lot like a guy that will go in the top three rounds after a solid three years in college.

    Bonus Prospects
    Matt Graham, RHP
    School & Hometown: Oak Ridge HS; Spring, TX
    Specs: 6′3, 195, Bats R, Throws R
    Skinny: Graham was one of the top five prep prospects in this class just a few months ago, as the next star pupil from guru Ron Wolforth’s academy that has already produced Scott Kazmir. Since then, he finished his junior season and pitched in some early showcases and his normal low-to-mid 90’s heater was in the 85-88 mph range and his stuff was down across the board. He doesn’t appear to be hurt, because he’s still pitching and visually looks fine. It may just be dead arm or something he needs to work through, and no one really knows what to make of him right now. If Graham can regain his prior form, he would jump into the top 5.

    Richard Stock, C
    School & Hometown: Agoura HS; Agoura Hills, CA
    Specs: 6′3, 185, Bats L, Throws R
    Skinny: Richard is the brother of current USC catcher and former high school showcase legend Robert Stock. Entering the season, much was known about Robert, and almost nothing about Richard. The younger brother has recently come on the scene and has caught some eyes. Accounts on his talent are few and far between at this point, but BA’s Dave Perkin is securely in the optimistic camp. Watch out for him to possibly shoot up this list in short order.

  9. #23
    Posting in Dynarama M2's Avatar
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    Re: 2009 MLB draft

    The more I read about Matzek and Purke, the more I'm convinced they aren't dominating enough to warrant a #8 pick. Arms like Porcello and Kazmir worked in the mid-90s with two big breaking pitches. Mind you, a HS arm would have to challenge Strasburg's status as the top overall arm in the draft in order to get me to take him in the top 10 picks.
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    Re: 2009 MLB draft

    I'd hate to see the Reds use one of their first three picks on a HS arm. It is a long road to the majors with many pitfalls along the way. A team needs to get at least one ML player out of each draft. Even though I favored Beckham, the Alonso choice last year made sense in that it gave the Reds a player with a strong probability of making the majors. I look for WJ to do that again this year. After the first few picks, a team can better afford to draft high risk/high ceiling players.

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    Re: 2009 MLB draft

    The more I read about Matzek and Purke, the more I'm convinced they aren't dominating enough to warrant a #8 pick. Arms like Porcello and Kazmir worked in the mid-90s with two big breaking pitches. Mind you, a HS arm would have to challenge Strasburg's status as the top overall arm in the draft in order to get me to take him in the top 10 picks.
    Let them have their spring season first. Porcello didn't solidify his status until he'd pitched as a senior. And the comparison to Strasburg is unfair -- arms like his are not in every draft.

    Right now I still like Matzek quite a bit. Unsure about Purke. But there's a whole chunk of information about all of these guys that's still missing...
    "Baseball is a very, very complex business. It's more of a people business than most businesses." - Bob Castellini

  12. #26
    BobC, get a legit F.O.! Mario-Rijo's Avatar
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    Re: 2009 MLB draft

    Quote Originally Posted by dougdirt View Post
    If Ackley doesn't show some power he might slip a bit....
    He won't need a lot if he can indeed play CF and per BA (or should say the scouts they spoke to) they seem to be pretty confident he can. He seems to have enough to be better than avg. out there at minimum. And he's another guy who will come fast. But I think they go pitcher 1st round and probably Gibson (RHP) or Minor (LHP).
    Last edited by Mario-Rijo; 02-08-2009 at 01:33 AM.
    "You can't let praise or criticism get to you. It's a weakness to get caught up in either one."

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  13. #27
    The Boss dougdirt's Avatar
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    Re: 2009 MLB draft

    Quote Originally Posted by Mario-Rijo View Post
    He won't need a lot if he can indeed play CF and per BA (or should say the scouts they spoke to) they seem to be pretty confident he can. He seems to have enough to be better than avg. out there at minimum. And he's another guy who will come fast. But I think they go pitcher 1st round and probably Gibson.
    What makes you think they will go pitcher in the first round?

  14. #28
    BobC, get a legit F.O.! Mario-Rijo's Avatar
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    Re: 2009 MLB draft

    Quote Originally Posted by dougdirt View Post
    What makes you think they will go pitcher in the first round?
    Just the odds. There may be a couple late risers but I just don't foresee many bats worthy of the #8 pick regardless of what happens between now and then. If Ackley or Tate isn't to their liking (not sure Tate will be) it's pretty much a gaurantee they will go pitcher. Only if maybe Kentrail Davis or LeMaheiu blow up between now and then or some super stud Bruce-like HS prospect rises to #8 will there be any thought for anything else, and I just don't see it happening.
    "You can't let praise or criticism get to you. It's a weakness to get caught up in either one."

    --Woody Hayes

  15. #29
    The Boss dougdirt's Avatar
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    Re: 2009 MLB draft

    Quote Originally Posted by Mario-Rijo View Post
    Just the odds. There may be a couple late risers but I just don't foresee many bats worthy of the #8 pick regardless of what happens between now and then. If Ackley or Tate isn't to their liking (not sure Tate will be) it's pretty much a gaurantee they will go pitcher. Only if maybe Kentrail Davis or LeMaheiu blow up between now and then or some super stud Bruce-like HS prospect rises to #8 will there be any thought for anything else, and I just don't see it happening.
    Funny things happen between February and June....

  16. #30
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    Re: 2009 MLB draft

    Quote Originally Posted by dougdirt View Post
    Funny things happen between February and June....
    Exactly. I don't think you can ever make any kind of statement like that about the baseball draft four months in advance. You NEVER know what will happen.
    Go BLUE!!!


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