Turn Off Ads?
Page 10 of 11 FirstFirst ... 67891011 LastLast
Results 136 to 150 of 159

Thread: Introducing the New 2B of the Reds: Aaron Boone

  1. #136
    Vavasor TRF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Amarillo, TX
    Posts
    13,281
    Those are good lists.

    but they don't prove the hitting is better. they prove the overall quality of pitching is worse. Are parks getting smaller? Comerica, Safeco, and isn't Pac Bell a pitchers park? Fenway is a pitchers park.

    the pitching is worse now. overall. Pedro, Johnson, Schilling are great in any era.

    Bere, Parris, Helling do not don a major league uni in the eighties, or any other era for that matter. they are bodies to fill out rosters. the talent pool is diluted by over 100 major leaguers. International players will help, but it's still a ways off.
    Suck it up cupcake.

  2. Turn Off Ads?
  3. #137
    breath westofyou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    42,350
    he pitching is worse now. overall. Pedro, Johnson, Schilling are great in any era.


    here are a couple more.

    from 1980-90

    Code:
    MAJOR LEAGUES PITCHING STATS
    
    YEAR     W      L   PCT     G      GS      CG    SV     GF       IP         H      R      ER       BB     SO
    1980   2101   2101 .500   10796   4210    856    902   3354   37861      38144   18053   16162   13190   20212 
    1981   1389   1389 .500    7439   2788    510    605   2278   25095.1    24157   11147    9992    8868   13237 
    1982   2106   2106 .500   11040   4214    734    932   3480   37878.1    37651   18110   16258   13302   21221 
    1983   2106   2106 .500   10978   4218    745    977   3473   37742      37443   18170   16241   13518   21716 
    1984   2104   2104 .500   11177   4210    632    993   3578   37704.2    37381   17921   15965   13320   22500 
    1985   2101   2101 .500   11504   4206    627    977   3579   37658.2    36778   18216   16292   13838   22451 
    1986   2102   2102 .500   11760   4206    579   1004   3627   37674.1    36880   18545   16629   14227   24706 
    1987   2105   2105 .500   12157   4210    561    971   3649   37574.2    37895   19883   17925   14389   25099 
    1988   2098   2098 .500   11531   4200    622   1049   3578   37667.2    36244   17380   15626   12984   23355 
    1989   2103   2103 .500   12111   4212    483   1069   3729   37715      36293   17405   15551   13528   23650 
    1990   2105   2105 .500   12694   4210    429   1113   3781   37563.2    36817   17919   16116   13852   23853 
    TOT   22420  22420 .500  123187  44884   6778  10592  38106  402135.1   395683  192749  172757  145016  242000 
    
    
    YEAR  ERA     HR   H/9   BR/9  SO/9  BB/9  SO/BB   SHO     WP    IBB    HBP    BFP      BK
    1980  3.84   3087  9.07 12.36  4.80  3.14  1.53    189   1031   1435    657   161210   257 
    1981  3.58   1781  8.66 12.01  4.75  3.18  1.49    135    714    895    464   105892   181 
    1982  3.86   3379  8.95 12.27  5.04  3.16  1.60    161   1091   1319    677   161104   256 
    1983  3.87   3301  8.93 12.32  5.18  3.22  1.61    180   1076   1379    717   160615   266 
    1984  3.81   3258  8.92 12.26  5.37  3.18  1.69    151   1129   1270    668   160566   283 
    1985  3.89   3602  8.79 12.26  5.37  3.31  1.62    163   1141   1337    699   160320   227 
    1986  3.97   3813  8.81 12.40  5.90  3.40  1.74    139   1323   1289    812   160858   289 
    1987  4.29   4458  9.08 12.72  6.01  3.45  1.74    138   1333   1287    842   161922   356 
    1988  3.73   3180  8.66 11.98  5.58  3.10  1.80    182   1262   1367    918   159380   924 
    1989  3.71   3083  8.66 12.08  5.64  3.23  1.75    152   1286   1446    801   160033   407 
    1990  3.86   3317  8.82 12.35  5.72  3.32  1.72    140   1355   1384    861   160316   288 
    TOT   3.87  36259  8.86 12.28  5.42  3.25  1.67   1730  12741  14408   8116  1712216  3734 
    
    
    Number of pitchers who had 1500 innings and pitched below the league average for ERA during that period.
    
    
    ERA                             ERA      ERA       W     
    1    Dwight Gooden              2.82     2.82      119   
    2    Roger Clemens              2.89     2.89      116   
    3    John Tudor                 3.07     3.07      116   
    4    Nolan Ryan                 3.16     3.16      135   
    5    Bob Welch                  3.18     3.18      164   
    6    Dave Stieb                 3.29     3.29      158   
    7    Rick Reuschel              3.31     3.31      100   
    8    Fernando Valenzuela        3.31     3.31      141   
    9    Danny Darwin               3.37     3.37      106   
    10   Mario Soto                 3.37     3.37       94   
    11   Bryn Smith                 3.37     3.37       90   
    12   Mike Scott                 3.46     3.46      123   
    13   Ron Darling                3.48     3.48       94   
    14   Jerry Reuss                3.48     3.48      105   
    15   Steve Carlton              3.48     3.48      104   
    16   Dave Stewart               3.52     3.52      123   
    17   Don Sutton                 3.53     3.53      107   
    18   Joe Niekro                 3.56     3.56      105   
    19   Rick Honeycutt             3.58     3.58       81   
    20   Eric Show                  3.59     3.59      100   
    21   Joaquin Andujar            3.60     3.60       90   
    22   Bill Gullickson            3.64     3.64      111   
    23   Scott Sanderson            3.64     3.64      102   
    24   Rick Rhoden                3.65     3.65      109   
    25   Ron Guidry                 3.66     3.66      111   
    26   Mike Boddicker             3.66     3.66      118   
    27   Frank Viola                3.70     3.70      137   
    28   Charlie Hough              3.70     3.70      140   
    29   Charlie Leibrandt          3.72     3.72      101   
    30   Bert Blyleven              3.74     3.74      131   
    31   Ed Whitson                 3.74     3.74      109   
    32   Bob Knepper                3.74     3.74      108   
    33   Dennis Eckersley           3.74     3.74       92   
    34   Jack Morris                3.74     3.74      177   
    35   Mike Witt                  3.79     3.79      114   
    36   Mike Krukow                3.81     3.81       98   
    37   Doyle Alexander            3.85     3.85      112   
    
    
    Now 1991-2002
    
    
    MAJOR LEAGUES PITCHING STATS
    
    YEAR     W      L   PCT     G      GS      CG    SV     GF       IP         H      R      ER       BB     SO
    1991   2104   2104 .500   13171   4208    366   1132   3842   37769.2    36558   18127   16410   13984   24390 
    1992   2106   2106 .500   13251   4212    419   1109   3793   37829.2    36544   17341   15744   13682   23538 
    1993   2268   2268 .500   14839   4538    371   1192   4167   40507      41088   20864   18861   15110   26310 
    1994   1599   1599 .500   10643   3200    255    777   2945   28586.1    29743   15752   14330   11131   19766 
    1995   2016   2016 .500   13915   4034    275   1006   3759   36032      36975   19554   17822   14240   25425 
    1996   2266   2266 .500   15594   4534    290   1116   4244   40560.2    42320   22831   20780   16093   29308 
    1997   2266   2266 .500   15857   4532    266   1139   4266   40454      41471   21604   19730   15666   29937 
    1998   2430   2430 .500   16827   4864    302   1265   4559   43434.2    44489   23244   21387   16447   31893 
    1999   2428   2426 .500   17276   4856    236   1217   4620   43117.1    45327   24691   22606   17891   31119 
    2000   2428   2428 .500   17220   4858    234   1178   4624   43244.1    45246   24971   22918   18238   31356 
    2001   2428   2428 .500   17624   4858    199   1210   4659   43287.1    43879   23199   21247   15806   32404 
    2002   2425   2425 .500   17611   4852    214   1224   4638   43269      43272   22408   20570   16246   31394 
    TOT   26764  26762 .500  183828  53546   3427  13565  50116  478092     486912  254586  232405  184534  336840 
    
    
    YEAR  ERA     HR   H/9   BR/9  SO/9  BB/9  SO/BB   SHO     WP    IBB    HBP    BFP      BK
    1991  3.91   3383  8.71 12.26  5.81  3.33  1.74    107   1390   1229    905   160746   241 
    1992  3.75   3038  8.69 12.18  5.60  3.26  1.72    146   1296   1315    980   160545   219 
    1993  4.19   4030  9.13 12.75  5.85  3.36  1.74     99   1473   1477   1200   174564   298 
    1994  4.51   3306  9.36 13.14  6.22  3.50  1.78     69   1162   1008    876   124483   174 
    1995  4.45   4081  9.24 13.10  6.35  3.56  1.79     88   1414   1105   1219   156703   199 
    1996  4.61   4962  9.39 13.27  6.50  3.57  1.82     84   1553   1343   1404   177261   197 
    1997  4.39   4640  9.23 13.03  6.66  3.49  1.91     89   1482   1169   1449   175541   188 
    1998  4.43   5064  9.22 12.95  6.61  3.41  1.94    101   1605   1062   1583   188225   205 
    1999  4.72   5528  9.46 13.53  6.50  3.73  1.74     64   1632   1105   1578   189692   177 
    2000  4.77   5693  9.42 13.54  6.53  3.80  1.72     72   1518   1208   1572   190261   161 
    2001  4.42   5458  9.12 12.80  6.74  3.29  2.05     74   1484   1384   1890   186976   151 
    2002  4.28   5059  9.00 12.74  6.53  3.38  1.93     87   1494   1452   1746   186615   160 
    TOT   4.37  54242  9.17 12.95  6.34  3.47  1.83   1080  17503  14857  16402  2071612  2370 
    
    
    
    Now Pitchers with 1500 innings and less than a 4.37 ERA
    
    CAREER
    1991-2002
    
    ERA < 4.37
    WINS displayed only--not a sorting criteria
    
    ERA                             ERA      ERA       W     
    1    Greg Maddux                2.56     2.56      213   
    2    Pedro Martinez             2.62     2.62      152   
    3    Randy Johnson              2.91     2.91      200   
    4    Tom Glavine                3.15     3.15      209   
    5    Kevin Brown                3.17     3.17      157   
    6    John Smoltz                3.26     3.26      135   
    7    Roger Clemens              3.31     3.31      177   
    8    Curt Schilling             3.32     3.32      154   
    9    Mike Mussina               3.54     3.54      182   
    10   David Cone                 3.56     3.56      140   
    11   Al Leiter                  3.60     3.60      123   
    12   Kevin Appier               3.67     3.67      148   
    13   Alex Fernandez             3.73     3.73      102   
    14   Tom Candiotti              3.77     3.77       80   
    15   Pete Harnisch              3.78     3.78       95   
    16   Ramon Martinez             3.81     3.81      108   
    17   Jeff Fassero               3.93     3.93      112   
    18   Andy Pettitte              3.93     3.93      128   
    19   Shane Reynolds             3.95     3.95      103   
    20   Hideo Nomo                 3.96     3.96       98   
    21   Mike Hampton               3.98     3.98      106   
    22   Jamie Moyer                4.00     4.00      130   
    23   Wilson Alvarez             4.01     4.01       88   
    24   Andy Benes                 4.02     4.02      139   
    25   Ken Hill                   4.02     4.02      105   
    26   Chuck Finley               4.04     4.04      152   
    27   Doug Drabek                4.08     4.08       86   
    28   Andy Ashby                 4.08     4.08       95   
    29   Darryl Kile                4.12     4.12      133   
    30   Mike Morgan                4.13     4.13       88   
    31   Orel Hershiser             4.17     4.17      105   
    32   Denny Neagle               4.17     4.17      122   
    33   David Wells                4.17     4.17      160   
    34   Jon Lieber                 4.18     4.18       86   
    35   Todd Stottlemyre           4.22     4.22      114   
    36   Pat Hentgen                4.22     4.22      122   
    37   Tim Wakefield              4.25     4.25      105   
    38   John Burkett               4.29     4.29      140   
    39   Kenny Rogers               4.29     4.29      132   
    40   Brad Radke                 4.30     4.30      102   
    41   Steve Trachsel             4.31     4.31       90   
    42   Bobby Jones                4.36     4.36       89   
    
    
    FWIW the first period only boasted 4 guys who were under 3.17 (1/2 run below average) while list 2 can boast 16 pitchers who fall below 1/2 a run
    Last edited by westofyou; 01-08-2003 at 05:06 PM.

  4. #138
    Vavasor TRF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Amarillo, TX
    Posts
    13,281
    Jeter sucks defensively. Not just my opinion. Nomar needs to stay healthy. Vlad is a monster. But overall Is there a thirdbaseman today better than Schmidt? For a few years Dale Murphy was the best OF in baseball.
    Suck it up cupcake.

  5. #139
    RaisorZone Raisor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Charlotte, Nc
    Posts
    15,126
    Originally posted by TRF
    Jeter sucks defensively. Not just my opinion.
    I wouldn't say that he "sucks", but he IS over-rated.

    But overall Is there a thirdbaseman today better than Schmidt? For a few years Dale Murphy was the best OF in baseball.

    And today's game has Bonds (who just might be the best LFer in history, and if not, he's in the top 2 or 3). AROD (the best shortstop in history), Mike Piazza (the best hitting catcher in history), etc etc etc

  6. #140
    Vavasor TRF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Amarillo, TX
    Posts
    13,281
    I'd argue Piazza is a 1B playing catcher.

    ARod is a freak in any era

    Bonds is juiced. there i said it. he knows it, so do we.
    Suck it up cupcake.

  7. #141
    RaisorZone Raisor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Charlotte, Nc
    Posts
    15,126
    Originally posted by TRF
    I'd argue Piazza is a 1B playing catcher.

    ARod is a freak in any era

    Bonds is juiced. there i said it. he knows it, so do we.
    I don't think I want to know how you got ahold of Bonds' urine.

    :evilgrin:

  8. #142
    Vavasor TRF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Amarillo, TX
    Posts
    13,281
    E bay
    Suck it up cupcake.

  9. #143
    Puffy's Daddy Red Leader's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Centerville, OH
    Posts
    20,422
    Originally posted by TRF
    E bay
    Did you "snipe" it?
    'When I'm not longer rapping, I want to open up an ice cream parlor and call myself Scoop Dogg.'
    -Snoop on his retirement

    Your Mom is happy.

  10. #144
    A Little to the Left Redsfaithful's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Bexley, OH
    Posts
    7,463
    Juiced or not, Bonds isn't just the greatest LF of all time, he's probably got a case to make for greatest player of all time. He's easily top ten.

    As far as the 80's vs. today, I think it's important to remember that the 80's weren't the pitching paradise that people remember. 1987 was one of the biggest offensive years in baseball history, and is still something of an anomaly statistics wise.

    A-Rod isn't a freak as much as a product of today's society. He's an incredibly hard worker, who benefits from greater knowledge of how to weight train, and condition. That to me is the difference between one era and another. People who don't think we're watching the greatest athletes in baseball history are just wrong. Put Bonds, or A-Rod, or even someone average like a Todd Walker in any other era and they would just mash the ball, day in and day out. Pitchers didn't throw as hard, as a whole. There were always the Nolan Ryan types who could throw a ball through a brick wall, but on average until the last ten years, a 90+ mph fast ball was something to write home about. Now if you throw 90 you're at home watching the game on TV with the rest of us.
    We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.
    --Oscar Wilde

  11. #145
    breath westofyou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    42,350
    Hey Redsfaithful, I like your Blog site.

    I see you're reading my alltime favorite novel by my all time favorite author too.

    Enjoy

  12. #146
    A Little to the Left Redsfaithful's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Bexley, OH
    Posts
    7,463
    Thanks for the kind words WOY, I can't believe how much they ruined it when they turned it into a movie! I saw Simon Birch years ago, and had no idea, it's really a shame.
    We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.
    --Oscar Wilde

  13. #147
    post hype sleeper cincinnati chili's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    10,791
    I love how there's about 4 different conversations going on, none of them involving Aaron Boone and 2B. Seriously. Those are the best kind of threads.

    I didn't hate Simon Birch, but it certainly didn't have the level of depth that Meany had. It's pretty much the first 100 pages of Owen Meany with a made up ending. Utterly forgettable, while the novel is unforgettable.
    How, then, are those people of the future—who are taking steroids every day—going to look back on baseball players who used steroids? They're going to look back on them as pioneers. They're going to look back at it and say "So what?" - Bill James, Cooperstown and the 'Roids

  14. #148
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,387
    Now if you throw 90 you're at home watching the game on TV with the rest of us.
    I remember when Seaver -- past his prime -- as a Red would occasionally hit 90 and the guys in the booth would just rave. Today the younger hurlers seem to be getting faster and faster. Is it a different radar gun? And they're not just throwers but at least have a breaking ball and some even get it in the zone. And every bullpen seems to have a couple of them to throw at you when the starters falter.

  15. #149
    post hype sleeper cincinnati chili's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    10,791
    I don't think the gun is getting faster. I think that, just like in virtually every sport on the planet, the athletes are better now than they every have been.
    How, then, are those people of the future—who are taking steroids every day—going to look back on baseball players who used steroids? They're going to look back on them as pioneers. They're going to look back at it and say "So what?" - Bill James, Cooperstown and the 'Roids

  16. #150
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Saint Joseph, Mo
    Posts
    601
    Might as well make my jaded commentary on this here thread which could be renamed "The Never Ending Story"

    People who don't think we're watching the greatest athletes in baseball history are just wrong - Reds Faithful

    Yep. Just about all the players from the 30s wouldn't do squat if they were transplanted into today's game as is. 20 year olds looked about 30, bodies were smaller overall, no one weight trained (Lord forbid that makes you musclebound don't you know). The most popular diet supplement was liquid malt barley in one form or 'nuther. Juiced meant a guy played better drunk, you slept on clanking, rocking, creaking trains and spent weeks on the road, living in pullman's and hotel rooms. Nutritional theory was the more fatty red meat the better and exercise was generally considered only in spring training if you weren't smart enough to get out of it then. If you pulled a muscle or tweaked a hammy you rubbed some homemade balm into it, gritted your teeth, shut your fool mouth and played the game. There was some kid playing out in the cornbelt who was hellbent to take your job and your boss was hellbent to give it to him if you faltered for a second. After all you were making 5 grand a year and he could pay that kid 1200 and a train ticket to do the same thing. You might be better but not if you're hurt - why give the kid any chance at showing his stuff. Keep playing. Sanitation was nonexistent. Well, okay, most guys washed their face once a day and a few bathed more than once a week, but only a few. Uniforms were worn until they could play the game by themselves. Don't tear it either - get a needle and darn it up - if the club has to buy another one for you before midpoint they'd deduct it from your check. Heck that's about 6 bottles of whiskey and a night with a Philly hooker! Players would have made good footballers though with all that weight. Wool uniforms full of sweat and 3 pounds of fermented dirt, heavy leather shoes with razored steel cleats, cotton unders and a patch of leather on your off-ham and you were playing with 20 pounds of itchy, scratchy, buggy, sometimes soggy, baggy mucilaginous fiber clinging to your every move. Compare that to today's featherweight outfits and shoes that weigh 6 ounces! Training equipment consisted of medicine balls, a big field and for pitchers, a wall to throw against. Knocking bottles off posts was a favorite way for kids to practice control, pitching off a concrete stoop and catching the rebounds, tossing at birds or rabbits and hitting rocks as far as you could were other disciplines of rigorous training. Stickball WAS great - it taught incredible bat control and concentration. You try hitting a small ball with a broomstick and see how well you do. Stickball in the streets is overlooked as a way to teach youngsters today. I'm seriuos. That's how I always coached my kids when I was involved in Pony baseball. I'd start out with stickball games and oven mitts for gloves. Bragging now but in twelve years coaching tykes we never once failed to win twice as many as we lost and a ton of my boys made allstar teams every year. Nothing special I did - just the stickball and oven mitts. Catch with an oven mitt and by gosh you WILL use 2 hands. Swing with a broomstick at a little rubber ball half the sizer of a baseball and by the time we played with real bats and balls and gloves the kids hardly missed anything. Easier to straighten out swings when they're hefting a broomstick, too. Helps them select the right weight bat, too. Most kids try to swing way too heavy. Anyway, drifting - back to former athletes.
    Today's players are far better athletes. Work regimens are religiously adhered to, scientific principles are utilized, professionals in kinesiology, nutrition, conditioning for specific functions, flexibility, even psychology are employed to help players train. In the 30s and 40s you were too busy at your 2nd job during the offseason to train much. During the season some guys main exercise consisted of bouncin a different Betty in every town you visited and brawling in saloons. There were lots of "good" guys, too, that had families and religion. They loafed around the hotel reading, writing letters and playing cards. Not every player was a hell-raiser but the ripsnorts probably got more exercise viz less sleep. Top it off with the fact that communicable diseases were widespread, nutrition from the cradle to grave was sometimes good but inconsistent. Food followed the economy - lots of people ate thin soup and litle else when times were slow. For lots of kids times was always slow. Then as now the greatest weapon against poverty was hard work but then as now there were lots of folk who ignored that fact. There was no foodstamps, no unemployment checks, no welfare boards to take up the slack for the children. If your parents were unlucky, or bums, or down and out, then you didn't eat much. You spent your hours in the streets, playing stickball, pitching against that stoop, playing burnout with your buddies and breathing, sleeping, dreaming baseball. Then you're 16 and good - you play on a town team or maybe a factory boss pays you 3 bucks a game to play on their team and gives your old man a job to boot. You learn the game the hard way against guys who'll spike you, crash into you, trip you and rag you unmercifully -nothing sacred, mothers not spared. You small and young and facing a hulk of a pitcher who throws 85 ( fast enough back then) and spits tobacco with every pitch. He's dug a rut 6 inches in front of the rubber, too and pitches from there - the umps are scared of him so who's going to stop him? You know you can't pull him so you slap at the ball and poke it into left with a bit of spin - the ball caroms off into foul gorund after striking fair and you run like a jackrabbit, skipping over the first baseman's extended foot, ducking the elbow aimed at your ribs the 2nd sacker points your way and you slide into third with your spikes up and slashing. Not trying to hurt the guy, just keeping him from getting close enough to stomp on you when he sweeps the tag.
    A couple years of this and a scout sees you and signs you for a ticket and fifty bucks and sends you to Red Oak, Iowa to play. You're 18 and weigh 140 sopping wet. Your face is drawn and you look 30 by today's standards but everyone in Red Oak calls you Cheeks because they think you have a "babyface". You're scrawny, undernourished, wiry strong but no one today would call you an athlete. Didn't then, either - you are a ballplayer. Big difference. Athletes are born - ballplayers are forged from runny gruel, concrete stoops, bouncing balls, broomsticks and hard knocks. You know all the dirty tricks - better known as essential survival techniques. At 21, you make the show. You do well, you're a 2nd baseman. You get on base any way you can, you holler at the pitcher, you steal when you can but only when its necessary. Go the other way, bunt, squeeze, and you've learned to swing from the heels when the pitcher is predictable. You use whatever you've been given, and you learn everything you can, every nuance possible. You are successful and your twetnies are golden years. Then you're 30. Within 2 or 3 years your career will be over. Your joints hurt, you've lost a couple of steps. You've played through aches and strains, and punished yourself for a decade to fend off the stream of prospects trying to unseat you. And now it happens. You're traded for no one inparticular to a terrible team. You play a couple years, your numbers aren't that bad but thwe little things are gone. You can't steal anymore, triples are doubles and doubles are singles and that kid up from Tuscaloosa that throws 92 just blows it by you. You retire at 33. You are old, ancient by baseball standards. You've never touched a weight set, never taken a vitamin or mineral supplement, never even heard of yoga or yogurt, never had a personal or team trainer, you have the beginnings of gout, and have had chicken pox, measles, mumps, rubella, and a variety of flus during your career. Mostly you played through it all and let your natural vitality cure it. You have a permanently bent finger from the time you broke it on a ball that jammed it, then you taped it, grimaced and played on. You have hammer toe because you played in second hand shoes for all those early years and the toe was too tight. You don't even know its why you couldn't run worth a damn anymore when you were just 30. You were a ballplayer. Now you're 33 and you're nothing. No job, no other skills, no player's association to write you a check. You take a job as a coach. You'll teach the same misguided theories and scoff at new advances in nutrition and training for years, delaying major advances in your sport until the mid to late 60s when rising salaries and advancing knowledge begins to change the way athletes take care of themselves and baseball begins to scout athletes for their potential instead of ballplayers for their skills. The theory is you can teach skills but you can't teach speed or genetics. In the back of my mind, this old man realizes they are right, but I miss the pure ballplayers. The ones who raised hell and tripped guys as they rounded second. The ones who took whatever you gave em and used it against you. When I was a child I watched ordinary men with extraordinary skills playing a game I loved. Today, I watch demi-gods of athleticism with lithe, muscular bodies play my beloved sport. The hope for the everyday joe, who works hard, who hones his skills fanatically, to play at the highest level, is almost gone. Yes, today's athletes are incredible and outclass their counterparts of yesteryear. They are not nearly as much fun to watch or follow.


Turn Off Ads?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Board Moderators may, at their discretion and judgment, delete and/or edit any messages that violate any of the following guidelines: 1. Explicit references to alleged illegal or unlawful acts. 2. Graphic sexual descriptions. 3. Racial or ethnic slurs. 4. Use of edgy language (including masked profanity). 5. Direct personal attacks, flames, fights, trolling, baiting, name-calling, general nuisance, excessive player criticism or anything along those lines. 6. Posting spam. 7. Each person may have only one user account. It is fine to be critical here - that's what this board is for. But let's not beat a subject or a player to death, please.

Thank you, and most importantly, enjoy yourselves!


RedsZone.com is a privately owned website and is not affiliated with the Cincinnati Reds or Major League Baseball


Contact us: Boss | GIK | BCubb2003 | dabvu2498 | Gallen5862 | LexRedsFan | Plus Plus | RedlegJake | redsfan1995 | The Operator | Tommyjohn25