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Thread: Brett Favre's Cellphone Seduction Of Jenn Sterger

  1. #46
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    Re: Brett Favre's Cellphone Seduction Of Jenn Sterger

    Quote Originally Posted by edabbs44 View Post
    There are plenty of employers who take certain things into account, especially those things that harm the reputation of your franchise's brand. If Favre worked for Apple and this story made its way around the world identifying him as an Apple executive, do you think they'd sit there and do nothing? Or do you think that HR, Legal, PR and Senior Management would be heavily involved?
    But I do reiterate, the teams, the ones that actually write the contracts out, have every right to look it over. I'm completely fine with that.

    The NFL is just the organization to oversee fair operations between the clubs themselves. Personnel issues should be above their pay grade. The franchises I've been involved with have never stepped into personnel issues. The ones within the actual company, on the franchisee level, are the ones that handle those matters. The franchise, the higher corporation, just manages the systems and making sure the overall operation is up to snuff.

    If the clubs want to look into player misconduct, I'm fine with that. The league, in my opinion, is overstepping their boundaries.
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  3. #47
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    Re: Brett Favre's Cellphone Seduction Of Jenn Sterger

    Quote Originally Posted by Brutus the Pimp View Post
    But I do reiterate, the teams, the ones that actually write the contracts out, have every right to look it over. I'm completely fine with that.

    The NFL is just the organization to oversee fair operations between the clubs themselves. Personnel issues should be above their pay grade. The franchises I've been involved with have never stepped into personnel issues. The ones within the actual company, on the franchisee level, are the ones that handle those matters. The franchise, the higher corporation, just manages the systems and making sure the overall operation is up to snuff.

    If the clubs want to look into player misconduct, I'm fine with that. The league, in my opinion, is overstepping their boundaries.
    I don't agree with that. The NFL has to pay attention to its franchises, they do not just oversee fair operations. Reputational harm to one team hurts them all, and therefore the NFL's brand.

    Going back to my example, what do you think Apple's reaction would be to that? Because the NFL's size and magnitude is on par with Apple. I don't know the size of the franchises you have been involved with, but players like the NFL value their brand as much as anything else.

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    Re: Brett Favre's Cellphone Seduction Of Jenn Sterger

    Quote Originally Posted by edabbs44 View Post
    There are plenty of employers who take certain things into account, especially those things that harm the reputation of your franchise's brand. If Favre worked for Apple and this story made its way around the world identifying him as an Apple executive, do you think they'd sit there and do nothing? Or do you think that HR, Legal, PR and Senior Management would be heavily involved?
    The difference is that if this happened to an Apple executive who wasn't Steve Jobs, no one - except some Apple stockholders, employees and board members - would care. The Better Business Bureau or the NYSE or the SEC wouldn't bother to look into it. It's certainly no worse than what happened with companies like Enron. If Apple VP of whatever Brett Favre did this, it wouldn't stop Joe Schmoe from buying a computer made by Apple. The national media wouldn't care. It would be an internal matter. If Brett Favre was a great VP for Apple, they would find a way to keep him because he's that good.

    As for harming the franchise value, how do Brett Favre's affair(s) harm a franchise's values any more than someone who is arrested for drunk driving or drug use or domestic violence? Sure, some people will be turned off but after some time, it will pass. People root for laundry.
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    Re: Brett Favre's Cellphone Seduction Of Jenn Sterger

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip R View Post
    The difference is that if this happened to an Apple executive who wasn't Steve Jobs, no one - except some Apple stockholders, employees and board members - would care. The Better Business Bureau or the NYSE or the SEC wouldn't bother to look into it. It's certainly no worse than what happened with companies like Enron. If Apple VP of whatever Brett Favre did this, it wouldn't stop Joe Schmoe from buying a computer made by Apple. The national media wouldn't care. It would be an internal matter. If Brett Favre was a great VP for Apple, they would find a way to keep him because he's that good.
    The BBB, NYSE and SEC are not the NFL in this case. The NFL is Apple. If someone is harming their name, franchise and brand, you bet the home office is going to get involved.

    But you are right, it probably wouldn't stop Joe Schmoe from buying one computer. But negative publicity doesn't help businesses like these. If Apple (or HP or Dell or whoever) has a rash of bad stories in the press, do you think that may affect the decision making ability of some school systems from buying hundreds of computers? Or government agencies?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip R View Post
    As for harming the franchise value, how do Brett Favre's affair(s) harm a franchise's values any more than someone who is arrested for drunk driving or drug use or domestic violence? Sure, some people will be turned off but after some time, it will pass. People root for laundry.
    I'm not talking about his affairs, I'm talking about him crossing into Predatorville.

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    Re: Brett Favre's Cellphone Seduction Of Jenn Sterger

    Quote Originally Posted by Brutus the Pimp View Post
    The league, in my opinion, is overstepping their boundaries.
    If this is something you consider overstepping, then they've been overstepping for 50 years on all sorts of matters. But ultimately, the NFL is the clubs. The commissioner and central office have the power the clubs have consented to give them. In instances like this, I'd argue the clubs prefer to let the league formulate policy, because (1) it saves them the trouble, (2) they don't have to justify decisions and (3) they don't risk looking bad relative to other clubs.
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    Re: Brett Favre's Cellphone Seduction Of Jenn Sterger

    Quote Originally Posted by IslandRed View Post
    If this is something you consider overstepping, then they've been overstepping for 50 years on all sorts of matters. But ultimately, the NFL is the clubs. The commissioner and central office have the power the clubs have consented to give them. In instances like this, I'd argue the clubs prefer to let the league formulate policy, because (1) it saves them the trouble, (2) they don't have to justify decisions and (3) they don't risk looking bad relative to other clubs.
    Well, I would argue that since the day Gooddell has stepped in for Tagliabue, he has been arranging meetings with seemingly every single bad egg in the league. It's almost monthly he's chasing after yet another off-field incident to 'punish' under the detrimental conduct policy. Just feels like it's obsessive.

    When another Bengals player gets into trouble, people don't go "oh look, that NFL is crooked." They tend to say, "oh, another Bengals player arrested. Surprise."

    I think it should be up to the teams to self-police their image. Employers have the right, within limits (and within the CBA) to decide what's fine and not fine for their organization. If the Vikings don't care that Brett Favre may or may not be another sex addict, the NFL should have no business deciding what's best for the team.

    I do agree that unfortunately the clubs have granted the league some of these powers, but I think they'll start to regret it. I personally already think it's going too far.
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    Re: Brett Favre's Cellphone Seduction Of Jenn Sterger

    Quote Originally Posted by Brutus the Pimp View Post
    Well, I would argue that since the day Gooddell has stepped in for Tagliabue, he has been arranging meetings with seemingly every single bad egg in the league. It's almost monthly he's chasing after yet another off-field incident to 'punish' under the detrimental conduct policy. Just feels like it's obsessive.

    When another Bengals player gets into trouble, people don't go "oh look, that NFL is crooked." They tend to say, "oh, another Bengals player arrested. Surprise."

    I think it should be up to the teams to self-police their image. Employers have the right, within limits (and within the CBA) to decide what's fine and not fine for their organization. If the Vikings don't care that Brett Favre may or may not be another sex addict, the NFL should have no business deciding what's best for the team.

    I do agree that unfortunately the clubs have granted the league some of these powers, but I think they'll start to regret it. I personally already think it's going too far.
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    Re: Brett Favre's Cellphone Seduction Of Jenn Sterger

    Quote Originally Posted by WVRed View Post
    From South Park:

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    Well done
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    Re: Brett Favre's Cellphone Seduction Of Jenn Sterger

    Quote Originally Posted by Brutus the Pimp View Post
    I think it should be up to the teams to self-police their image. Employers have the right, within limits (and within the CBA) to decide what's fine and not fine for their organization. If the Vikings don't care that Brett Favre may or may not be another sex addict, the NFL should have no business deciding what's best for the team.

    I do agree that unfortunately the clubs have granted the league some of these powers, but I think they'll start to regret it. I personally already think it's going too far.
    I understand why the NFL does it like this. If you left it to the clubs to police themselves, discipline would be inconsistent from one club to the next. Left to their own devices, the Steelers may not have disciplined Rothlisberger at all for his incident in Georgia. A lesser player may have been suspended. With the NFL handling discipline problems, it eliminates the appearance of a conflict of interest. Bias may still be there but there is less of a chance for a conflict of interest than there would be if things were handled by the individual clubs.

    I'm all for the NFL investigating things like domestic violence or drug use or other illegal things. But I don't believe that this is something the NFL should be investigating.
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    Re: Brett Favre's Cellphone Seduction Of Jenn Sterger

    Quote Originally Posted by edabbs44 View Post
    I'm not talking about his affairs, I'm talking about him crossing into Predatorville.
    That's the thing that creeps me out. I certainly don't like to see any man be unfaithful to his spouse, but it does happen, a lot, and there's not much any of us can do about that.

    But this, this looks like a guy who expects to get whomever he wants and has a real problem taking "no" for an answer from women he feels should submit to him. And it's very clear to me that this was unprovoked, I mean... he wouldn't be sounding so desperate in those voicemails if this wasn't all unprovoked.
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    Re: Brett Favre's Cellphone Seduction Of Jenn Sterger

    Quote Originally Posted by Brutus the Pimp View Post
    Well, I would argue that since the day Gooddell has stepped in for Tagliabue, he has been arranging meetings with seemingly every single bad egg in the league. It's almost monthly he's chasing after yet another off-field incident to 'punish' under the detrimental conduct policy. Just feels like it's obsessive.

    When another Bengals player gets into trouble, people don't go "oh look, that NFL is crooked." They tend to say, "oh, another Bengals player arrested. Surprise."

    I think it should be up to the teams to self-police their image. Employers have the right, within limits (and within the CBA) to decide what's fine and not fine for their organization. If the Vikings don't care that Brett Favre may or may not be another sex addict, the NFL should have no business deciding what's best for the team.

    I do agree that unfortunately the clubs have granted the league some of these powers, but I think they'll start to regret it. I personally already think it's going too far.
    Times are a-changing in this world. Technology has made advances since Tags was in office, and it also seems like players have upped the bar in the behavior department.

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    Re: Brett Favre's Cellphone Seduction Of Jenn Sterger

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip R View Post
    I understand why the NFL does it like this. If you left it to the clubs to police themselves, discipline would be inconsistent from one club to the next. Left to their own devices, the Steelers may not have disciplined Rothlisberger at all for his incident in Georgia. A lesser player may have been suspended. With the NFL handling discipline problems, it eliminates the appearance of a conflict of interest. Bias may still be there but there is less of a chance for a conflict of interest than there would be if things were handled by the individual clubs.

    I'm all for the NFL investigating things like domestic violence or drug use or other illegal things. But I don't believe that this is something the NFL should be investigating.
    Favre has made the move from cheater to predator. Next stage is sexual assault. The NFL does not want that kind of black eye, especially with a marquee name.

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    Re: Brett Favre's Cellphone Seduction Of Jenn Sterger

    Quote Originally Posted by *BaseClogger* View Post
    As a member of the media, once they receive this lead isn't it their journalistic responsibility to inform the public and report on it?
    Uh, no?
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    Re: Brett Favre's Cellphone Seduction Of Jenn Sterger

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip R View Post
    I understand why the NFL does it like this. If you left it to the clubs to police themselves, discipline would be inconsistent from one club to the next. Left to their own devices, the Steelers may not have disciplined Rothlisberger at all for his incident in Georgia. A lesser player may have been suspended. With the NFL handling discipline problems, it eliminates the appearance of a conflict of interest. Bias may still be there but there is less of a chance for a conflict of interest than there would be if things were handled by the individual clubs.

    I'm all for the NFL investigating things like domestic violence or drug use or other illegal things. But I don't believe that this is something the NFL should be investigating.
    My take: what happens off the field is off the field. I say let the law handle those problems. Why do the clubs need to be obligated to punish the players?

    I honestly don't care if someone gets caught with weed. Or if someone gets a DUI. Not to say some of those things aren't bad, but there's a court system in place in America to prosecute criminal offenders. I don't really think playing football or baseball obligates someone to punish you for something that will be taken care of by the justice system.

    I guess as fans, do we really need to see a player suspended because of what they do off the field or court? I don't care about perception. It's entertainment for me. What they do with their own devices doesn't change the entertainment value. If they screw up and do bone-headed things, if they're illegal I expect them to pay their debt to society, but I don't think they have to pay their debts to the NFL.

    I firmly support the right of employers to make their own personnel decisions and hiring on whatever criteria they like, as long as it's not prejudicial because of race (or gender with regard to professions that are not requiring stricter physical standards), or even sexuality. But it's with that mindset that I don't think each team's moral code should have to be consistent with other clubs.

    If the Chargers don't want guys being busted for marijuana possession, but the Bengals are willing to tolerate it, does that really matter? It's a personal choice. They're each free to cater to their own standards.
    "No matter how good you are, you're going to lose one-third of your games. No matter how bad you are you're going to win one-third of your games. It's the other third that makes the difference." ~Tommy Lasorda

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    Re: Brett Favre's Cellphone Seduction Of Jenn Sterger

    Quote Originally Posted by Brutus the Pimp View Post
    My take: what happens off the field is off the field. I say let the law handle those problems. Why do the clubs need to be obligated to punish the players?

    I honestly don't care if someone gets caught with weed. Or if someone gets a DUI. Not to say some of those things aren't bad, but there's a court system in place in America to prosecute criminal offenders. I don't really think playing football or baseball obligates someone to punish you for something that will be taken care of by the justice system.

    I guess as fans, do we really need to see a player suspended because of what they do off the field or court? I don't care about perception. It's entertainment for me. What they do with their own devices doesn't change the entertainment value. If they screw up and do bone-headed things, if they're illegal I expect them to pay their debt to society, but I don't think they have to pay their debts to the NFL.

    I firmly support the right of employers to make their own personnel decisions and hiring on whatever criteria they like, as long as it's not prejudicial because of race (or gender with regard to professions that are not requiring stricter physical standards), or even sexuality. But it's with that mindset that I don't think each team's moral code should have to be consistent with other clubs.

    If the Chargers don't want guys being busted for marijuana possession, but the Bengals are willing to tolerate it, does that really matter? It's a personal choice. They're each free to cater to their own standards.
    I just think that somewhere their is language written in a labor or franchise contract that probably gives the NFL an umbrella policy to police behavior that they view unfitting of the league. I see your point about individual employers, but I'm sure in order to field an NFL team, you sign paperwork agreeing to play by their rules. You don't like it...take your team to the CFL.


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