Turn Off Ads?
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Sabermetrics Article in WSJ

  1. #1
    Member muddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Raleigh, N.C.
    Posts
    1,966

    Sabermetrics Article in WSJ

    This is an article I believe several of you guys might find interesting. It is a piece in the weekend edition of the WSJ book section that takes off on sabermetrics in baseball.


    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...oks_LS_Books_8

  2. Turn Off Ads?
  3. #2
    The Boss dougdirt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    35,093

    Re: Sabermetrics Article in WSJ

    The article starts off with something that bothers me. The photo of Strasburg and then this caption:
    "Washington Nationals pitcher Stephen Strasburg blew out his arm as a rookie. Will new camera-based analysis, now overtaking statistics within front offices, allow teams to forestall such injury?"

    I know plenty of people who looked at Strasburg's mechanics and thought he was an injury waiting to happen because of the hyperabduction he gets when he loads. This isn't exactly a new idea. I have heard it for at least 5 years now (in terms of the type of mechanics Strasburg employs, not Strasburg himself).

  4. #3
    Member muddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Raleigh, N.C.
    Posts
    1,966

    Re: Sabermetrics Article in WSJ

    Doug, if you haven't already read the entire article, do. It is pretty good.

  5. #4
    The Boss dougdirt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    35,093

    Re: Sabermetrics Article in WSJ

    Quote Originally Posted by muddie View Post
    Doug, if you haven't already read the entire article, do. It is pretty good.
    I just finished it. It ended the same way it started.... with talking about Strasburgs mechanics incorrectly. Strasburg didn't get hurt because he had a bad finish, he got hurt because of the middle of his delivery when he gets his elbow higher than his shoulder (just like the also mentioned Chris Sale). Now, I am sure the writer of the article isn't exactly an expert in the field and is simply doing some book reviews, but it still rubs me the wrong way slightly. I am excited about the Field F/X data though, as well as the Hit F/X data. I can't wait to get my hands on it if MLBAM allows it to go public like they have with the Pitch F/X data.

  6. #5
    Member muddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Raleigh, N.C.
    Posts
    1,966

    Re: Sabermetrics Article in WSJ

    Quote Originally Posted by dougdirt View Post
    I just finished it. It ended the same way it started.... with talking about Strasburgs mechanics incorrectly. Strasburg didn't get hurt because he had a bad finish, he got hurt because of the middle of his delivery when he gets his elbow higher than his shoulder (just like the also mentioned Chris Sale). Now, I am sure the writer of the article isn't exactly an expert in the field and is simply doing some book reviews, but it still rubs me the wrong way slightly. I am excited about the Field F/X data though, as well as the Hit F/X data. I can't wait to get my hands on it if MLBAM allows it to go public like they have with the Pitch F/X data.

    FWIW, this article is not about Strasburg. The article is about the progression of sabermetrics and the legitimacy the 'art' of sabermetrics is gaining among the higher ups in baseball, albeit slowly. Strasburg's injury was just the vehicle the writer chose to introduce the topic.

  7. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    4,654

    Re: Sabermetrics Article in WSJ

    I agree that it's a well-done, provocative article. And I agree that Strasburg and his mechanics have little to do with its general purpose. However, I thought the most useful, profound passage did have Strasburg as its inspiration, more or less:

    "Imagine that every team can tell that a young pitcher—like Stephen Strasburg of the Nationals or Chris Sale of the White Sox—is adding 40% to his chances of tearing up his elbow because he finishes his delivery poorly. The real advantage will then be with the team that can assess his character and judge whether he's the sort of kid who can change his motion and stick to it. In other words, subjective reads on motivation, intelligence and aptitude—the province of scouts and grizzled managers—will again become paramount."

    It's a favorite theme of mine . . . that sabermetrics are extraordinarily enlightening, but can't take you all the way to the finish line. Ultimately, games are still decided by old-fashioned insight, character and intangibles.

  8. #7
    Churlish Johnny Footstool's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Olathe, KS
    Posts
    13,783

    Re: Sabermetrics Article in WSJ

    Quote Originally Posted by dougdirt View Post
    The article starts off with something that bothers me. The photo of Strasburg and then this caption:
    "Washington Nationals pitcher Stephen Strasburg blew out his arm as a rookie. Will new camera-based analysis, now overtaking statistics within front offices, allow teams to forestall such injury?"

    I know plenty of people who looked at Strasburg's mechanics and thought he was an injury waiting to happen because of the hyperabduction he gets when he loads. This isn't exactly a new idea. I have heard it for at least 5 years now (in terms of the type of mechanics Strasburg employs, not Strasburg himself).
    The whole idea of predicting injuries based on mechanics seems very dicey to me. I think there are too many microfactors to accurately predict who is going to get injured and when.

    Even if a guy has a "perfect" pitching motion, injury can strike.

    I remember a few years ago when everyone was saying Rich Harden could pitch forever with that easy motion of his.

    A few years before that, people lauded Mark Prior's pristine mechanics.
    "I prefer books and movies where the conflict isn't of the extreme cannibal apocalypse variety I guess." Redsfaithful

  9. #8
    Box of Frogs edabbs44's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    16,296

    Re: Sabermetrics Article in WSJ

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny Footstool View Post
    The whole idea of predicting injuries based on mechanics seems very dicey to me. I think there are too many microfactors to accurately predict who is going to get injured and when.

    Even if a guy has a "perfect" pitching motion, injury can strike.

    I remember a few years ago when everyone was saying Rich Harden could pitch forever with that easy motion of his.

    A few years before that, people lauded Mark Prior's pristine mechanics.
    It seems like there have been a lot of people who have "predicted" certain arm injuries. Has there been any legitimate studies or breakdowns which predicted pitchers who will stay healthy?


Turn Off Ads?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Board Moderators may, at their discretion and judgment, delete and/or edit any messages that violate any of the following guidelines: 1. Explicit references to alleged illegal or unlawful acts. 2. Graphic sexual descriptions. 3. Racial or ethnic slurs. 4. Use of edgy language (including masked profanity). 5. Direct personal attacks, flames, fights, trolling, baiting, name-calling, general nuisance, excessive player criticism or anything along those lines. 6. Posting spam. 7. Each person may have only one user account. It is fine to be critical here - that's what this board is for. But let's not beat a subject or a player to death, please.

Thank you, and most importantly, enjoy yourselves!


RedsZone.com is a privately owned website and is not affiliated with the Cincinnati Reds or Major League Baseball


Contact us: Boss | GIK | BCubb2003 | dabvu2498 | Gallen5862 | LexRedsFan | Plus Plus | RedlegJake | redsfan1995 | The Operator | Tommyjohn25