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Thread: Lions Tigers and Bears loose in Zanesville OH!

  1. #16
    A Little to the Left Redsfaithful's Avatar
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    Re: The true story behind the exotic animal "escape"

    I knew most of the animals were killed on his property because the news told me so. Go figure.

    Those animals were dead when he let them out. It was a foregone conclusion at that point, and I think it's likely he knew that (getting back at his estranged wife maybe?)

    Any animal that eats you right away when you're dead isn't much of a pet. That's why I'm not a cat owner.
    We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.
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  3. #17
    Member forfreelin04's Avatar
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    Re: The true story behind the exotic animal "escape"

    Like I said, I'm not going to try and convince anyone of anything. I just don't care that much what you want to believe.

    But if your the type a person who doesn't mind having some truth, but not all of the truth in your news then your part of the problem with this country.

  4. #18
    Viva la Rolen kaldaniels's Avatar
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    Re: The true story behind the exotic animal "escape"

    Quote Originally Posted by forfreelin04 View Post
    Like I said, I'm not going to try and convince anyone of anything. I just don't care that much what you want to believe.

    But if your the type a person who doesn't mind having some truth, but not all of the truth in your news then your part of the problem with this country.
    What exactly are you trying to get us to understand here?

    The animals were on his property and could have been tranquilized? That's all I am getting but perhaps you are trying to get at something deeper here.

  5. #19
    Bread Gloves Razor Shines's Avatar
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    Re: The true story behind the exotic animal "escape"

    Quote Originally Posted by forfreelin04 View Post
    If you want to believe your source of news over me, then thats fine. I'm just a poster on Redszone to all of you. But I'm 28, extremely successful, and not in the business of getting attention on message boards. My own mother trusted Brian Williams over me.

    .


    Oh thank God. I didn't believe you because I thought you were 25 and poor, everyone knows you can't trust the poor.

    I really don't give a Sbomb about any of this and I think I'm the only one of this board that doesn't have a boatload of family that live near this guy's farm. I just thought that part was funny.

  6. #20
    1st pick 2022 B.B. draft George Foster's Avatar
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    Re: The true story behind the exotic animal "escape"

    Those animals had to be put down, and fast. They could not take the chance of them leaving the property and eating some kid at the morning bus stop 4 or 5 days later when they got really hungry. Public safety trumps animals....every single time.

    Most tigers and lions you see in the zoo were born in captivity, as were their parents and grandparents. There is a reason that a big fense and mote surrounds those cages. There are lots of youtube videos that will show you what happens when a stupid human comes into contact with them.

    This "tranquilizer argument" holds no water. How many local, rural, police departments keep and maintain tranquilizer guns? Really? Reports were that the closest tranquilizer guns were 20 minutes away. Well thats 40 minutes round trip. Are you going to ask Mr. Lion and Mr. Tiger who was just feeding on the head of their now dead care giver to not go anywhere?

    If one of those beasts escaped and killed someone and I knew I could of put it down but didn't because I gave in to the politically correct culture I could not live with myself. Those cops did the right thing. Even the remote chance in the loss of human life alway trumps animal life. If you think any different you would change your mind if it was your kid that "got it" playing outside or at the bus stop.
    Not this year...maybe a Wild Card

  7. #21
    THAT'S A FACT JACK!! GAC's Avatar
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    Re: The true story behind the exotic animal "escape"

    Quote Originally Posted by George Foster View Post
    Those animals had to be put down, and fast. They could not take the chance of them leaving the property and eating some kid at the morning bus stop 4 or 5 days later when they got really hungry. Public safety trumps animals....every single time.....

    This "tranquilizer argument" holds no water. How many local, rural, police departments keep and maintain tranquilizer guns? Really? Reports were that the closest tranquilizer guns were 20 minutes away. Well thats 40 minutes round trip. Are you going to ask Mr. Lion and Mr. Tiger who was just feeding on the head of their now dead care giver to not go anywhere?
    Overall I tend to agree with what you're saying above; but I think the police could have possibly approached the situation differently. And I don't say that to say they are guilty of wrongdoing or should be condemned either. Public safety is the #1 priority. And I'm not sure on all the facts surrounding this situation either, BUT...

    - who called the police to inform them the animals were loose?
    - how long were the animals loose and wandering around on his property before the police arrived?
    - Sure, the local and state police may (or may not) possess tranquilizer guns, but when they were initially called and told the animals were loose - and the local police already knew the circumstances on that farm - why couldn't they have coordinated their efforts better and immediately contacted those that possessed tranquilizer guns - at least made the effort if they were only 20 minutes away - and had them meet them at the scene? After all, how long did it take the police to organize, get the armament they needed ready, and get there?

    I personally think it could have been handled better.
    "panic" only comes from having real expectations

  8. #22
    Big Red Machine RedsBaron's Avatar
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    Re: The true story behind the exotic animal "escape"

    Quote Originally Posted by Redsfaithful View Post
    Those animals were dead when he let them out. It was a foregone conclusion at that point,
    I agree. For those who were friends with the owner I offer my condolences but letting those animals out was not a "born free" moment--it was the animals' death sentence.
    "Hey...Dad. Wanna Have A Catch?" Kevin Costner in "Field Of Dreams."

  9. #23
    Member cumberlandreds's Avatar
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    Re: The true story behind the exotic animal "escape"

    Having a racoon for a pet is one thing and having a grizzly bear is quite another. It's a shame what happened but I don't think the authorities had much choice. These animals when out in the "wild" would have reverted back to their natural instict to find food,water and shelter. They would not have been "pets" then and would have been mankillers. Having these types of exotic "pets" needs to be tightly controlled or another incident like will likely happen somewhere.
    Reds Fan Since 1971

  10. #24
    A Little to the Left Redsfaithful's Avatar
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    Re: The true story behind the exotic animal "escape"

    Having a raccoon for a pet isn't the brightest thing either. I hope anyone that does that sort of thing doesn't have kids, and yes I know it happens, I grew up in Appalachia.

    I don't get what drives people to want to own wild animals. I have a golden retriever and she fulfills all the pet needs I have, I can't even understand why people own more exotic things like snakes or rats, let alone lions.
    We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.
    --Oscar Wilde

  11. #25
    Please come again pedro's Avatar
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    Re: The true story behind the exotic animal "escape"

    Quote Originally Posted by Redsfaithful View Post
    Any animal that eats you right away when you're dead isn't much of a pet. That's why I'm not a cat owner.
    My cats are great pets and I always keep the food bowl VERY full.
    Get your nunchucks and the keys to your dad's car. I know where we can get a gun

  12. #26
    Viva la Rolen kaldaniels's Avatar
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    Re: The true story behind the exotic animal "escape"

    Quote Originally Posted by pedro View Post
    My cats are great pets and I always keep the food bowl VERY full.
    Stay strong Pedro.

  13. #27
    A Little to the Left Redsfaithful's Avatar
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    Re: The true story behind the exotic animal "escape"

    Quote Originally Posted by pedro View Post
    My cats are great pets and I always keep the food bowl VERY full.
    I actually like cats, I just figure they're pretty indifferent about me.
    We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.
    --Oscar Wilde

  14. #28
    breath westofyou's Avatar
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    Re: The true story behind the exotic animal "escape"

    Quote Originally Posted by Redsfaithful View Post
    Having a raccoon for a pet isn't the brightest thing either. I hope anyone that does that sort of thing doesn't have kids, and yes I know it happens, I grew up in Appalachia.

    I don't get what drives people to want to own wild animals. I have a golden retriever and she fulfills all the pet needs I have, I can't even understand why people own more exotic things like snakes or rats, let alone lions.
    My wife has worked with gorillas, elephants and also been attacked by a pet raccoon, she has quite few stories about the strength of these animals.

    What happened last week was tragic and stupid and could have been avoided by the owner, as for Hannah my wife has worked with some of his group and the fact is he's extremely respected in the community he serves and the fact is that community dies not condone endangered species as "pets" they consider them for what they are, beautiful animals that are killing machined by nature.

    Just a sad sad story

  15. #29
    I hate the Cubs LoganBuck's Avatar
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    Re: The true story behind the exotic animal "escape"

    I have refrained from posting on this.

    During college, I had a summer job, where I used to work with a guy in my general neighborhood that had exotic animals. Tigers, Lions, Alligators, Monkeys, and a Grizzly Bear. On occasion we ate lunch together, and I would ask him questions. He told me that he was licensed and had at least bi yearly surprise inspections from the state. He told me about how he fed the large predators, and the respect he had for them. He thought he was in control. He got caught up in some illegal trade of tiger cubs, and lost some licenses a few years ago, the info is on the internet if you look for it. I am not sure he still has animals, but a few months ago I drove past his house, and a large peacock was sitting in his yard beside the road. I found the whole endeavor to be a dangerous, foolish, and cruel way to have a hobby.

    As to killing the animals at Zanesville, I know a thing or two about rogue animals. Sadly too much. The most dangerous animals to humans in the United States are breeding bulls that reside on farms and ranches across this country. These animals are fenced behind single strands of electric fence, or in pens with cows that must be handled several times a day(where escape routes are limited). Bulls are typically in peak physical condition, extremely territorial, and amped up with Testosterone. About 20 people die in the USA every year from bull attacks. A friend of our family died twenty years ago after he was crushed by a mature bull.

    You don't take chances with animals that can kill you. In the case of the rogue bulls, after they turn dangerous, they are typically shot, because you can't take the risk at any point from farm to slaughterhouse. Someone could get killed. This is why most dairy farmers use frozen bull semen, and artificial insemination.

    I realize these wild animals were pets, but they did manage to bite into the head of their owner post mortem. Could they have been tranquilized? Maybe, but given the time of day, and the sheer numbers, this was all on the owner. As others said, when he opened those cages, he sealed their fate.
    The Sox traded Bullfrog the only player they've got for Shottenhoffen. Four-eyes Shottenhoffen a utility infielder. They've got a whole team of utility infielders.

  16. #30
    Score Early, Score Often gonelong's Avatar
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    Re: The true story behind the exotic animal "escape"

    Quote Originally Posted by LoganBuck View Post
    The most dangerous animals to humans in the United States are breeding bulls that reside on farms and ranches across this country.
    ...
    You don't take chances with animals that can kill you.
    Story time ...

    I worked on my neighbors dairy farm when I was 13-15 (I was not raised on a farm). Cutting across the barn one day and heard a snort behind me as I was crossing one of the pens that they kept cows ready to birth. As I turned around to look ... there stood their bull, which was perpetually pissed-off, pawing he ground and snorting steam. This bull was literally 10-12 inches taller in his back than their cows, he was just one *massive* SOB.

    I decided I could either inch my way out, or take a mad dash. I went for the mad dash and lept a full-sized metal swinging gate, on a dead run, with the bull in close pursuit. The bull ran into the gate with a full head of steam and bent it into a V. He then proceeded to tear the durn thing into pieces. Too late, I was long gone by then.

    My neighbor hear the commotion and ran outside to see what was going on, all he saw was me running full speed away from the barn, so he followed. He went white when I told him what had happened. He had forgotten to tell me they moved the bull into the pen that morning. They were leary of him too (farmers all their lives) and that was the final straw .. that bull was gone the next day.

    GL

    /cool story bro (yeah, yeah)


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