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Thread: Logan Ondrusek Thread

  1. #136
    Have Faith In Dusty DGullett35's Avatar
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    Re: Logan Ondrusek Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by mth123 View Post
    David Weathers as a Red:

    398.2 IP, ERA+ 112, K/9 6.4, BB/9 3.7, HR/9 0.9

    Logan Ondrusek:

    164.1 I, ERA+ 120, K/9 6.0, BB/9 3.9, HR/9 1.0
    He still has some innings to go to catch up but they are earily similar
    "Losing feels worse than winning feels good." -Vin Scully

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  3. #137
    High five! nate's Avatar
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    Re: Logan Ondrusek Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by mth123 View Post
    David Weathers during his Red's career might be pretty close.
    Astute observation:

    David Weathers: 2005-2009 (roughly, his time with the Reds)
    K/9: 6.04
    BB/9: 3.70
    HR/9: 0.97
    BABIP: .261

    Logan Ondrusek: career
    K/9: 6.02
    BB/9: 3.89
    HR/9: 1.04
    BABIP: .248

    Tidbit: looking up Weathers' stats resulted in an exact duplication of the lower back spasm I felt every time he came in to pitch.
    "Bring on Rod Stupid!"

  4. #138
    The Big Dog mth123's Avatar
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    Re: Logan Ondrusek Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by nate View Post
    Astute observation:

    David Weathers: 2005-2009 (roughly, his time with the Reds)
    K/9: 6.04
    BB/9: 3.70
    HR/9: 0.97
    BABIP: .261

    Logan Ondrusek: career
    K/9: 6.02
    BB/9: 3.89
    HR/9: 1.04
    BABIP: .248

    Tidbit: looking up Weathers' stats resulted in an exact duplication of the lower back spasm I felt every time he came in to pitch.
    "All I can tell them is pick a good one and sock it." --BABE RUTH

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  5. #139
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    Re: Logan Ondrusek Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by RedsManRick View Post
    I don't know why you people can't accept a simple fact. Logan Ondrusek might not miss a lot of bats. He might walk a lot of people. And he may give up more than his fair share of homers. But the man is extremely talented at limiting his BABIP and stranding runners.

    If sabermetrics has taught us anything, it's that pitchers can suck at everything else and still put up a lower BABIP than Mariano Rivera. You guys need to get out of your mother's basement and watch some baseball. Clearly Ondrusek is one of this team's best options in high leverage situations.
    I feel bludgeoned by intelligence, this is basically a religious experience. We should all be grateful.

  6. #140
    Et tu, Brutus? Brutus's Avatar
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    Re: Logan Ondrusek Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by kaldaniels View Post
    I consider (how ever embarrassing it is to you) myself to think along the same lines as both of you guys, Ed and Brutus. So I'm just suprised to see you both totally rejecting the notion that Logan is not expected to do well going forward.
    I haven't totally rejected the notion, but at this point you could have said that about Ondrusek each of the past three years and yet it still hasn't happened. At what point doe someone accept the possibility that FIP isn't always the best predictor (it's actually not statistically much better a predictor than ERA as I mentioned in post #116)?

    My stance all along is that Ondrusek is an average reliever. His OPS, a bottom line metric incorporating everything a pitcher surrenders, continues to support that with some room to spare (as he's technically been above-average for three years running). That allows for some wiggle room if the BABIP does come up a bit. But again... it's been three years and he's still carrying these numbers.
    "No matter how good you are, you're going to lose one-third of your games. No matter how bad you are you're going to win one-third of your games. It's the other third that makes the difference." ~Tommy Lasorda

  7. #141
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    Re: Logan Ondrusek Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by nate View Post
    Really? What were "our" perceptions and opinions and what is the "correct" way of viewing it now?
    In general, we are finding out that there are more pitchers than originally expected, who can keep a low BABIP over their career. We are finding through advanced PitchFx that more pitchers than expected can increase the amount of weak contact against them. Not talking GB/FB/LD, but actual velocity and trajectory of the ball. Basically, the notion that pitchers can't control their BABIP isn't as true as we had believed.

    And this is one that many have missed, but relievers are able to maintain lower BABIP than starters. This actually makes sense, since they pitch very differently than starters. They only see a few batters an outing, and rarely face the same batter more than two or times a season, as compared to starters who see the same batters two or three times a game. There's a lot more differences, but that's a key one.

    This is a crude instrument, but I don't have time to do anything more in depth. However, it is still very telling.

    It's the BABIP of each team, broken down by starters and relievers. The first number is the number of teams that had a BABIP .280 or below. The second is the lowest BABIP that a team had that season. Again, broken down by starters and relievers

    The take away:

    From 2003-2012, teams starters compiled 27 BABIP's .280 and below. Teams relievers compiled 67 BABIP's .280 and below. The average lowest BABIP for starters was .271, the lowest average BABIP for relievers was .262. And not on the chart, team's starters compiled 4 BABIP's below .270, while relievers compiled 19 BABIP's below .270.

    Code:
    Year	Start #<.281	Start Lowest	Relief #<.281	Relief Lowest
    
    2012	6	0.275	10	0.263
    2011	1	0.265	10	0.267
    2010	2	0.269	5	0.267
    2009	3	0.271	7	0.266
    2008	1	0.273	4	0.257
    2007	1	0.274	2	0.263
    2006	1	0.275	3	0.272
    2005	4	0.266	8	0.256
    2004	2	0.274	6	0.257
    2003	6	0.267	12	0.264
    Total	27	0.271	67	0.262
    "Man, the pitch looks fast, even in slow motion." Thom Brennaman on Chapman's fastball.

  8. #142
    One and a half men Patrick Bateman's Avatar
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    Re: Logan Ondrusek Thread

    In relation to the argument that we have a sufficient sample size for Ondrusek to suggest that he has the ability to outperform his FIP going forward, I would have to disagree with that suggestion. 164 innings of pitching is not a sufficient sample. For example, there are plenty of starting pitchers who have a fluke season, that entails about 180-200 innings. Really, Ondrusek's sample is that of one year's worth of a starting pitcher. There are plenty of examples of a starting pitcher being lucky just for a season.

    Secondly, the Reds have had above average defense over the time period that Ondrusek has pitched in the major leagues. Again, considering the relatively small sample size, it would be reasonable to suggest that in front of a good defense, Ondrusek would stand to benefit from that. Mix in some general luck, and there is a clear recipe for how he could outperform his FIP, independent of skill.

    Thirdly, I have seen Ondrusek referred to in this thread of being capable of inducing groundballs? He actually has demonstrated no discernable skill to do so.

    I think the David Weathers comp (with the Reds) is a good one. And I think over a larger sample size, Weathers would have eventually broke. The fact that there are few other good comps from my original question suggests that these pitchers just don't consistently outperform there peripherals by that much.

    In the end, Ondrusek has demonstrated no discernable skills to K players, limit walks, or induce sufficient groundballs to limit home runs. Find me a player with a long term BAPIP of .248, and maybe there is a case here, but there's not.

    I'm sticking with my original comp of Gary Majewski. Ondrusek is going to fall apart given enough chances IMO.

  9. #143
    Et tu, Brutus? Brutus's Avatar
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    Re: Logan Ondrusek Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Bateman View Post

    Thirdly, I have seen Ondrusek referred to in this thread of being capable of inducing groundballs? He actually has demonstrated no discernable skill to do so.
    I've already given my thoughts on your other points, so I won't beleaguer the point, but I have to question this statement.

    No discernable skill to induce grounders? Patrick, his career GB/FB ratio is 1.24. NL league average this year is 0.85.

    How is that not discernable? He's been above league average at inducing grounders in three consecutive seasons. Forty six percent above league average for his career. That seems rather distinguishable to me.
    "No matter how good you are, you're going to lose one-third of your games. No matter how bad you are you're going to win one-third of your games. It's the other third that makes the difference." ~Tommy Lasorda

  10. #144
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    Re: Logan Ondrusek Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by 757690 View Post
    In general, we are finding out that there are more pitchers than originally expected, who can keep a low BABIP over their career. We are finding through advanced PitchFx that more pitchers than expected can increase the amount of weak contact against them. Not talking GB/FB/LD, but actual velocity and trajectory of the ball. Basically, the notion that pitchers can't control their BABIP isn't as true as we had believed.
    To me (not "we" or "us"), my understanding of BABIP hasn't changed from this:

    Some pitchers have some influence on their BABIP.

    And this is one that many have missed, but relievers are able to maintain lower BABIP than starters. This actually makes sense, since they pitch very differently than starters. They only see a few batters an outing, and rarely face the same batter more than two or times a season, as compared to starters who see the same batters two or three times a game. There's a lot more differences, but that's a key one.

    This is a crude instrument, but I don't have time to do anything more in depth. However, it is still very telling.

    It's the BABIP of each team, broken down by starters and relievers. The first number is the number of teams that had a BABIP .280 or below. The second is the lowest BABIP that a team had that season. Again, broken down by starters and relievers

    The take away:

    From 2003-2012, teams starters compiled 27 BABIP's .280 and below. Teams relievers compiled 67 BABIP's .280 and below. The average lowest BABIP for starters was .271, the lowest average BABIP for relievers was .262. And not on the chart, team's starters compiled 4 BABIP's below .270, while relievers compiled 19 BABIP's below .270.

    Code:
    Year	Start #<.281	Start Lowest	Relief #<.281	Relief Lowest
    
    2012	6	0.275	10	0.263
    2011	1	0.265	10	0.267
    2010	2	0.269	5	0.267
    2009	3	0.271	7	0.266
    2008	1	0.273	4	0.257
    2007	1	0.274	2	0.263
    2006	1	0.275	3	0.272
    2005	4	0.266	8	0.256
    2004	2	0.274	6	0.257
    2003	6	0.267	12	0.264
    Total	27	0.271	67	0.262
    Nice analysis but I would want to see how that compares to the league BABIP and mean BABIP. Or compare that to some multi-season rolling average.

    Or not. I don't think it would really change my opinion of Ondrusek.

    He sure is tall!

    That's my best superlative for him at the moment.
    "Bring on Rod Stupid!"

  11. #145
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    Re: Logan Ondrusek Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by kaldaniels View Post
    I consider (how ever embarrassing it is to you) myself to think along the same lines as both of you guys, Ed and Brutus. So I'm just suprised to see you both totally rejecting the notion that Logan is not expected to do well going forward.
    Dd I totally reject anything?

  12. #146
    Viva la Rolen kaldaniels's Avatar
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    Re: Logan Ondrusek Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by edabbs44 View Post
    Dd I totally reject anything?
    Sorry to have misspoke, I guess what I have seen is a rejection (in a broad sense) as to how we evaluate relievers. Don't take that the wrong way. I see ERA and OPS-against being used to evaluate (in support of) Logan. Since when are those top tier stats used to evaluate relievers, especially one with 164 or so total innings in his career.

  13. #147
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    Re: Logan Ondrusek Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by kaldaniels View Post
    Sorry to have misspoke, I guess what I have seen is a rejection (in a broad sense) as to how we evaluate relievers. Don't take that the wrong way. I see ERA and OPS-against being used to evaluate (in support of) Logan. Since when are those top tier stats used to evaluate relievers, especially one with 164 or so total innings in his career.
    I don't care for ERA, but I think OPS is a much better stat to be used than FIP or xFIP which ignore everything in the field of play. In fact, it's been shown now that ERA predictors such as tERA and SIERA have a much higher predictive value to future ERA than the fielding-independent metrics.

    I liked FIP for a few years, but as research has evolved, I'm now of the opinion it is too narrow.

    Now, I will add, I think an adjusted OPS is better than raw, but I think a raw OPS is better than FIP.
    "No matter how good you are, you're going to lose one-third of your games. No matter how bad you are you're going to win one-third of your games. It's the other third that makes the difference." ~Tommy Lasorda

  14. #148
    One and a half men Patrick Bateman's Avatar
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    Re: Logan Ondrusek Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Brutus View Post
    I've already given my thoughts on your other points, so I won't beleaguer the point, but I have to question this statement.

    No discernable skill to induce grounders? Patrick, his career GB/FB ratio is 1.24. NL league average this year is 0.85.

    How is that not discernable? He's been above league average at inducing grounders in three consecutive seasons. Forty six percent above league average for his career. That seems rather distinguishable to me.
    Ondrusek has a career groundball perentage of 46.8%. The current year NL average is roughly 45%. He might be marginally above average, but it's certainly not something to hang your hat on (and I would say is not a "discernable" skill of his).

    And where was it addressed that 160 innings is an appropriate sample, and the consideration for the impact of an above average defense over that time period?

  15. #149
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    Re: Logan Ondrusek Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Bateman View Post
    Ondrusek has a career groundball perentage of 46.8%. The current year NL average is roughly 45%. He might be marginally above average, but it's certainly not something to hang your hat on (and I would say is not a "discernable" skill of his).

    And where was it addressed that 160 innings is an appropriate sample, and the consideration for the impact of an above average defense over that time period?
    I don't know of any situations where someone with a 1.24 GB:FB ratio is not considered a groundball pitcher. And what's more is that in addition to his GB:FB ratio, which is nearly 50 percent above league average, he's also induced a very healthy 14% IFFB rate in his career. He's keeping the ball down and getting more grounders than flyballs, he's inducing fewer line drives than most players and is getting a high number of infield pop-ups. That's why his OPS continues to be better than average relievers despite his mediocre K:BB rate.

    As far as the sample issue, I don't think there's any comparison to 160 innings over the course of 160 appearances and 160 innings over the course of 27 appearances. Whether 160 innings is enough to gauge a reliever or not is debatable, but to suggest that 160 innings is "like" one season as a starter is disingenuous. If a pitcher has a good outing as a starter, that usually carries over for 6-7 innings. But if you have a good outing as a reliever, you have to come right back the next night and do it again and you're still only a third of the number of innings a starter pitched on one night. There's no comparison in sample size between the two because of the dynamics of an appearance.
    Last edited by Brutus; 08-19-2012 at 08:12 PM.
    "No matter how good you are, you're going to lose one-third of your games. No matter how bad you are you're going to win one-third of your games. It's the other third that makes the difference." ~Tommy Lasorda

  16. #150
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    Re: Logan Ondrusek Thread

    A few points:
    1) Any pitcher whose effectiveness depends upon maintaining a significantly lower than average BABIP will not be as effective in the future as they have been in the past independent of environment or their teammates.

    2) Things like tERA and Sierra are second generation versions of FIP, i.e. they aren't a move away from DIPs theory but rather they are metrics that try to do an even better job of removing factors that are out of the pitcher's control. FIP, tERA, and SIERRA are defense independent metrics.
    "This isnít stats vs scouts - this is stats and scouts working together, building an organization that blends the best of both worlds. This is the blueprint for how a baseball organization should be run. And, whether the baseball men of the 20th century like it or not, this is where baseball is going."---Dave Cameron, U.S.S. Mariner


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