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Thread: Something a bit disturbing

  1. #31
    Member Tuff Nut's Avatar
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    Re: Something a bit disturbing

    Quote Originally Posted by TSJ55 View Post
    This is one of the weakest points commonly heard on the subject. All skill being equal, a player who is bigger, faster, stronger will turn what would have been a sawed off bloop to the SS to a dying quail over his head. What would have been a long out to get over the wall. What would have been a single into a double. In the field they get to balls they wouldn't have ordinarily gotten to and make throws they wouldn't have been able to ordinarily make.
    Reguardless of what the ball will do, said player still has to make contact....If he hits 5 balls 500 ft but strikesout 20 times in between each HR......I'll take the outs.

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  3. #32
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    Re: Something a bit disturbing

    Regardless if it helps the layer perform better or not it's still illegal! Is there a way for baseball to stop this or is this one that baseball will just stick their head in the sand? Do I believe the 80% number? NO. Do I believe that it is rampant thru baseball? Absolutely! It disturbs me that the game may or may not be compromised and that anytime a guy has a resurgence or comes back from injury quickly I am gonna wonder if he is dirty! That bugs the hell out of me

  4. #33
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    Re: Something a bit disturbing

    Quote Originally Posted by Zimmers View Post
    Regardless if it helps the layer perform better or not it's still illegal! Is there a way for baseball to stop this or is this one that baseball will just stick their head in the sand? Do I believe the 80% number? NO. Do I believe that it is rampant thru baseball? Absolutely! It disturbs me that the game may or may not be compromised and that anytime a guy has a resurgence or comes back from injury quickly I am gonna wonder if he is dirty! That bugs the hell out of me
    Why? I would think a fan of the game would want to see the best players on the field. I would think baseball would too. Kind of baffling MLB bans HGH or testosterone. Its beneficial for the players and keeps them at peak performance year round. I support the use of HGH fully and you should too.

  5. #34
    ZCTRMTP!!!!! texasdave's Avatar
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    Re: Something a bit disturbing

    Quote Originally Posted by webbbj View Post
    Why? I would think a fan of the game would want to see the best players on the field. I would think baseball would too. Kind of baffling MLB bans HGH or testosterone. Its beneficial for the players and keeps them at peak performance year round. I support the use of HGH fully and you should too.
    I could not agree less. I think they should kick the cheating dogs out of the game.
    A summer watching a bad Reds' team, is still a pretty good summer.

  6. #35
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    Re: Something a bit disturbing

    Quote Originally Posted by texasdave View Post
    I could not agree less. I think they should kick the cheating dogs out of the game.
    its only cheating b/c MLB decided they wanted to make it that way. If they allowed HGH it wouldnt be cheating.

    HGH is not like steroids where there are many negative long term side affects that go along w/ the short term benefits. From everything Ive learned HGH is perfectly okay from a health stand point.

  7. #36
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    Re: Something a bit disturbing

    Quote Originally Posted by webbbj View Post
    its only cheating b/c MLB decided they wanted to make it that way. If they allowed HGH it wouldnt be cheating.

    HGH is not like steroids where there are many negative long term side affects that go along w/ the short term benefits. From everything Ive learned HGH is perfectly okay from a health stand point.
    HGH appears to be perfectly okay in those who are naturally deficient, such as older folks who have slowed/stopped natural production. However, to inject your body with excess GH can be extremely dangerous and unfortunately there has not been a test to detect it long enough to study the long term effects of it's use/abuse.

  8. #37
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    Re: Something a bit disturbing

    Quote Originally Posted by Tuff Nut View Post
    Reguardless of what the ball will do, said player still has to make contact....If he hits 5 balls 500 ft but strikesout 20 times in between each HR......I'll take the outs.
    I don't understand what you're saying here.

  9. #38
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    Re: Something a bit disturbing



    this is what HGH will do for you !!

  10. #39
    Member The_Mudshark's Avatar
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    Re: Something a bit disturbing

    Quote Originally Posted by webbbj View Post
    Yeah they did. They knew it was going on. They didnt test for the stuff and now guys like Bonds, Clemens, Mcgwire, Sosa, etc unrightfully being left out of the HOF b/c baseball chose not to police its sport and allows sports writers to be decision makers on their HOF credentials.
    +1
    Pinch hitting for Pedro Borbon...

  11. #40
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    Re: Something a bit disturbing

    Quote Originally Posted by Redsrule5 View Post
    Sad,but I don't think that PEDs are only to blame.Roger Maris hit 61 homers in 1961,a record that stood for 37 years.Along comes 1998 when 3 guys all of a sudden are challenging this record.No one has come close since.I'm not much of a "conspiracy theorist", but I just have to think that MLB was involved in this.If it were only PEDs,this record would be challenged every other year.Just my opinion....

    I think adding the expansion teams had much more to do with these power bursts than anything.

    McGwire hit 12 HRs in 1998 against the D'Backs, Marlins, and Rockies, not too mention the unknown variable of taking talent away from the other teams.


    Another point I'd like to make is the MLB stars get better as they age through their 30's until they begin to lose bat speed. Hank Aaron, for instance, had his best three AB/HR ratios in his late 30's, much like Bonds and McGwire.

    The difference being, he only was getting 500 PA's a year, rather than 700.

    http://www.baseball-reference.com/pl...ha01-bat.shtml

    Mays had a similar effect.

  12. #41
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    Re: Something a bit disturbing

    What if the MLB implemented a zero tolerance policy? Do you think guys would risk using PEDs if they messed up and got caught that they wouldn't be allowed in the MLB ever?

  13. #42
    ZCTRMTP!!!!! texasdave's Avatar
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    Re: Something a bit disturbing

    Dangers of Human Growth Hormone!
    To be completely transparent, there is a need for human growth hormone injections for a specific population group. HGH has been shown to be useful in the treatment of children and adults who have significant growth hormone deficiencies. However, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists strongly warns against the use of growth hormone injections for those with overweight/obesity issues or as an anti-aging treatment.

    Robert N. Butler, M.D., the noted gerontologist has also weighed in on this matter. According to Dr. Butler, “Although hormone-replacement trials have yielded some positive results (at least in the short term), it is clear that negative side effects can also occur in the form of increased risk for cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavior changes.”

    One of the main dangers of human growth hormone injections is the unregulated effect it can have on the overproduction of IGF-1 concentrations. This can lead to some very serious side effects like:

    Swelling in the arms and legs
    Carpal tunnel and arthritis-like symptoms
    Headaches and general muscle pain
    Diabetes
    Abnormal growth of the bones and internal organs
    High blood pressure
    General bloating
    Hardening of the arteries
    Why should a person have to, potentially, put his health in jeopardy to compete with other players who don't mind being cheating dogs?
    And whether baseball does or does not test for them is irrelevant. It is against the law. There are some FDA-approved reasons for doctors to prescribe synthetic HGH. I did not see "to become a cheating-dog baseball player" on that list.
    A summer watching a bad Reds' team, is still a pretty good summer.

  14. #43
    13 Belongs in Cooperstown Captain13's Avatar
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    Re: Something a bit disturbing

    I want to know why all the uproar over anabolic steroids, HGH, and testosterone, but nobody seems to care about amphetamines. They have been in the game for decades, they were illegal and nobody cares. Why do we care about cheaters from the "steroid era" but not from the "golden age of baseball". A cheater is a cheater is a cheater. One can't be worse than the other.
    What if this is as good as it gets?

  15. #44
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    Re: Something a bit disturbing

    Quote Originally Posted by TeamSelig View Post
    What if the MLB implemented a zero tolerance policy? Do you think guys would risk using PEDs if they messed up and got caught that they wouldn't be allowed in the MLB ever?
    A few would with nothing else to lose, but not many.

  16. #45
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    Re: Something a bit disturbing

    Quote Originally Posted by texasdave View Post
    Why should a person have to, potentially, put his health in jeopardy to compete with other players who don't mind being cheating dogs?
    And whether baseball does or does not test for them is irrelevant. It is against the law. There are some FDA-approved reasons for doctors to prescribe synthetic HGH. I did not see "to become a cheating-dog baseball player" on that list.
    Really hard for anyone to argue against this point effectively.


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