Interesting article from former Post and Citybeat writer Bill Peterson:

http://www.labigleagues.com/2013/01/...rter-into.html

It now is 2013, of course, and we haven't inducted a starting pitcher who debuted in 1971 or later. Now, every starting pitcher who debuted from 1971 through 1983 has come and gone, barely without acknowledgement on any Hall of Fame ballot, except Morris. The next debut year up for discussion is 1984, the year Roger Clemens broke in, and that one is going to be deferred, at least for a while. The next debut year that stands to have launched a starting pitcher towards the Hall of Fame is 1986, the year Greg Maddux began with the Chicago Cubs.

So, we're looking at a window of 15 years, 1971 through 1985, a full generation of starting pitchers, that we have deemed unsuitable for the Hall of Fame. Obviously, no pitcher from that generation produced obvious Hall of Fame numbers. Morris is the only one who has even come close, and the case for him can't be said to rest easily in the statistics. One would believe that our great nation produced a crop of complete pitching deadbeats in the birth years 1952 through 1965. And it is true that in the 1980s, managers and pitching coaches began complaining about a shortage of quality pitchers.