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Thread: Home cooking tips during this crisis

  1. #1
    Member North's Avatar
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    Home cooking tips during this crisis

    I posted this in one of the covid threads but it is long buried. Feel free to add tips you come across.


    Quarantine cooking: How to stretch meals when times are tough


    https://buffalonews.com/2020/04/17/q...mes-are-tough/

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    goreds2 (04-20-2020)


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    Sprinkles are for winners dougdirt's Avatar
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    Re: Home cooking tips during this crisis

    Nearly every day my first meal is 2 eggs with a sprinkle of green onions, a sprinkle of bacon bits, and sometimes if I'm feeling wild, a sprinkle of shredded cheese.

    I've been doing lots of rice and some sort of meat as a bit of a "taco" kind of solution. I've done grilled chicken, ground chicken, and ground beef over the last month to mix in with some rice, a dab of sour cream, a little bit of lettuce or spinach, and a sprinkle of cheese. Sometimes it's just that stuff in a bowl. Sometimes it's that stuff in a tortilla.

    I've got a stash of tuna. I tend to eat a lot of tuna, so when it's "tuna week", I'll use three cans of tuna, two hard boiled eggs chopped up, 1 sandwich pickle sliced up, some mayo, and a little mustard, and that usually covers lunch for like 4-5 days - usually as a sandwich, but sometimes I'll just use a spoon. I'm weird.

    Dinner is usually when I go "off script", so to speak. I change that up most nights. Planning on making some chili this week, which will last for several days.

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    goreds2 (04-20-2020),North (04-20-2020)

  6. #3
    Member Rantly's Avatar
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    Re: Home cooking tips during this crisis

    Quote Originally Posted by dougdirt View Post
    Nearly every day my first meal is 2 eggs with a sprinkle of green onions, a sprinkle of bacon bits, and sometimes if I'm feeling wild, a sprinkle of shredded cheese.

    I've been doing lots of rice and some sort of meat as a bit of a "taco" kind of solution. I've done grilled chicken, ground chicken, and ground beef over the last month to mix in with some rice, a dab of sour cream, a little bit of lettuce or spinach, and a sprinkle of cheese. Sometimes it's just that stuff in a bowl. Sometimes it's that stuff in a tortilla.

    I've got a stash of tuna. I tend to eat a lot of tuna, so when it's "tuna week", I'll use three cans of tuna, two hard boiled eggs chopped up, 1 sandwich pickle sliced up, some mayo, and a little mustard, and that usually covers lunch for like 4-5 days - usually as a sandwich, but sometimes I'll just use a spoon. I'm weird.

    Dinner is usually when I go "off script", so to speak. I change that up most nights. Planning on making some chili this week, which will last for several days.
    That tuna sounds great, I'm hungry.

  7. #4
    First Time Caller SunDeck's Avatar
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    Re: Home cooking tips during this crisis

    My cooking tip would be to have Doug come to my house and make breakfast. Except for stupid social distancing.

    Here's something I've instituted: 14 hour fasting. So, I don't eat after 6pm, then I make breakfast at 9am (that's usually more like 15, I know. Sometimes I eat at 8am).
    Tea or coffee without milk is allowed during fasting.
    There are a couple reasons I am doing this;

    1) Lots of diabetes in our family and I've read that intermittent fasting may help to reduce blood sugar levels. It has something to do with getting your body to burn fat for energy instead of just relying on carbs, sugar, etc. that you take in when you're an undisciplined eater. My understanding is probably only superficial, but it seemed to make sense to regiment the intake.

    2) Not biking to work everyday and instead teleworking has reduced my activity level quite a bit. It seemed this would be a good way to take in fewer calories because my evening routine often included snacking. Hoping to keep from growing out of my jeans during the pandemic.
    Next Reds manager, second shooter. --Confirmed on Redszone.

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    North (04-20-2020)

  9. #5
    Be the ball Roy Tucker's Avatar
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    Re: Home cooking tips during this crisis

    My cheap go-to is chicken broth.

    Start with 2 3.5 lb. chickens (or whatever size you can get). In a large stock pot, dump in the chickens and a mirepoix of celery, onion, and carrots. I usually start with 3-4 quarts of water or enough to cover the chickens. Bring it to a fast simmer.

    After an hour, I pull the chickens out and let them cool enough to handle. Strip all the meat you can off the bones. I usually use just a fork and hands to separate the meat. Set aside to cool. Bag it up in 1/4-1/2 lb. bags and freeze.

    I return all the bones and skin to the pot. *Not* any of the innards (liver, etc). Make the broth kinda nasty. I add more water to keep it at a 3-4 quart level. I then leave it on the stove at a low simmer for 10-12 hours. When done, I run it through a strainer to strain out all the solids (bones, skin, veggies). I usually then put the pot out in the garage to cool overnight and let the fat solidify on top. Note I always make broth in the winter so the garage is plenty cold.

    The next morning, I pick the solidified chicken fat disc (aka schmaltz) off the top. You could probably use it for something but I’ve never tried. I just pitch it. I’ll add a little more water to the broth to dilute it since it usually is intense. Do this to taste. I freeze it in gallon ziploc bags and freeze it flat. It stores much better that way.

    We then make soup when the mood strikes. Usually get some good hearty Amish noodles and make chicken noodle soup with a mirepoix and the leftover chicken. I’ve also made chicken and rice if we have some rice leftover from a meal. Sometimes a mug of hot broth and a nice chunk of bread is a nice lunch. Or a Tex-Mex soup with broth, corn, black beans, etc.

    You can get a lot of meals out of a $10 investment for a couple chickens.
    Big John's been drinking since the river took Emmylou

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    North (04-21-2020)

  11. #6
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    Re: Home cooking tips during this crisis

    Having a freezer full of homemade chicken stock is totally a great thing to have.

    I just did a batch the last time it was below 35 degrees overnight (Roy is right, it's great to let nature do the cooling, because if you put a giant pot of hot stock in the fridge, it will heat up your fridge more than your fridge cools the stock), and hope to get one more batch in soon.

    Only real deviation: I really recommend roasting at least some of your chicken in a deep baking pan, and saving the drippings. Cool that chicken and pick the meat the next day, throwing the drippings, bones, and skin into the stock pot. I usually use whole chickens or leg quarters for this part. The roast chicken parts have so much more depth of flavor, if you ask me. Then I throw raw chicken wings or drumsticks (whatever's cheap or on sale) to supplement the stock and leave it in for the duration. Needs plenty of salt at this point, obviously. I like adding some peppercorns, along with thyme and sage (fresh, not ground, so it can be strained to get a clear stock), too, but you do you.

    The roasted meat can be frozen for throwing into soups, or turned into croquettes, or whatever.

    Once cooled and strained, the stock can be frozen at regular strength, but I also take some of it and simmer it until it is reduced down to 1/8th or so. When cooled, this basically turns into a super concentrated Chicken Gel that will kick the ass of any bullion you have ever used (and it saves freezer space, too!).
    Last edited by FlightRick; 04-21-2020 at 12:36 AM.

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    North (04-21-2020),Roy Tucker (04-21-2020)

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    Re: Home cooking tips during this crisis

    You broth folks are speaking my language.

    I live near a Mexican market, and they have all kinds of smoked turkey parts, along with the more typical ham pieces.

    Using the smoked turkey parts, typically dirt cheap necks and wings, dials up the traditional chicken broth. Make soups, of course, add to beans, in vegetables; good way to flavor any leftovers you might have the in fridge. Really helps in chicken chili and tortilla-type soups. My favorite soup is pintos, broken up spaghetti pieces, collard greens, garlic and paprika.

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    Roy Tucker (04-21-2020)

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    Re: Home cooking tips during this crisis

    A good cast iron Dutch Oven. Make whole pot meals, roasts, braises, etc.

    Buy whole primals from places like Sams if you can, break them down yourself and make lots of meals out of it.

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    North (04-21-2020),Roy Tucker (04-21-2020)

  17. #9
    Member North's Avatar
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    Re: Home cooking tips during this crisis

    If you have flour but no yeast, try this:

    How to make matzoh, a survival food from biblical times
    10/14/2019 / By Grace Olson


    https://foodcollapse.com/2019-10-14-...-biblical.html

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    Roy Tucker (04-21-2020)

  19. #10
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    Re: Home cooking tips during this crisis

    If you find yourself in need of throwing together a quick meal, here’s a good one.

    Start with a rotisserie chicken from your favorite grocery. Pull all of the meat from the carcass.

    Thinly slice an onion and a small container of baby portabella mushrooms. Add 2 cloves garlic either jarred minced or fresh. Sauté with EVOO or butter in a large pan. (I use a 12” cast iron skillet, but whatever you’ve got will do). Season with salt, pepper, and Italian seasoning to taste.

    Once the veg is cooked, pull it to the edges of the pan and put the chicken in. Cook, stirring frequently, long enough to warm it up and get some delicious golden browning on the meat.

    Add a pack of baby spinach over the top and cover the pan. Cook until the spinach is wilted. You may have to stir a couple of times.

    Add in more olive oil at any point you think it’s getting dry.

    Season again as necessary.

    Top with Italian shredded cheese mix.

    Enjoy.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    North (05-07-2020)


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